FAQ

Are There Criteria For Choosing My Desired Implant? How Is The Actual Weight Of Breast Implants? At An Earlier Phase Of Breast Augmentation, Will Implants Make Breasts Sag? Is The Lifespan Of Breast Implants Up To 12 Years? Will Gummy Bear Implants Last Longer Than The Others? Where Is Breast Augmentation Carried Out? Is Breast Augmentation Hurtful? Which Anesthesia Is Preferably Used During Breast Augmentation? Post-operative care/instructions Call your doctor if… What can my activity level be when I get home? Will I need to wear any protective garments following my procedure? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? How did my procedure go? Make sure your procedure has been confirmed? How long will my procedure take? Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information? Call your doctor if you think of other questions? Will I need someone to drive me home from your clinic? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my procedure? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? What can I expect my pain to be like? How will my procedural area feeling the short and long-term? How long will I have to stay after my procedure? How long will this procedure take? How long will it take before my procedural area to recover so that I can see its final shape? Will I have any swelling, tenderness or discomfort in my procedural area? Will I have any visible marks from the laser? How much will the procedure cost? What are the chances that I may need additional procedures after this one? How long will the results of this procedure last? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? What are the possible options for what my procedural area may look like after my procedure? What areas can you perform the skin tightening/body contouring treatment on? What are my surgical options? Are there any other non-surgical options? What are the risks and possible complications of this procedure? Post-operative care/instructions Call your doctor if… After your procedure When can I resume sexual activity? When can I drive again? When can I go back to work? Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity? Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities? What can my activity level be when I get home? Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises? Follow your doctor’s instructions on wearing any supportive equipment for your thighs? Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? Keep your incision clean and dry? When can I take a shower? Follow your doctor’s instructions on caring for any drains you may go home with? How often should I take sitz baths? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications? How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my vagina? Take pain and other medications as prescribed? You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control? How do I take care of my incision(s)? How are we going to manage my pain? You have persistent numbness/tingling in your legs? Your bandages are repeatedly soaked with blood? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision? When can I eat or drink? You have shortness of breath or chest pain? When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy? Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy? How did my procedure go? Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room? On the day of the surgery Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication? Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? When will my visitors be able to see me? How long will it be until I wake up? Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care? How long will my surgery take? When can I resume sexual activity? How long will my surgery take? When can I drive again? Preparing for your surgery Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? When can I go back to work? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What can my activity level be when I get home? How long do I need to wear any special supportive clothing? What time should I arrive for my surgery? Do I have sutures that need to be removed? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Questions to Ask After My Surgery Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? When can I take a shower? Can you review my medication list with me? How do I take care of my incision? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? Call your doctor if… How long will it be until I can go back to work? How are we going to manage my pain? After the procedure How long will it be until I can drive again? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? When can I resume sexual activity? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? When can I drive again? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? When can I go back to work? When can I eat or drink? What can my activity level be when I get home? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? When can I have my drains or tubes removed? How long will I need to use any special equipment, such as a boot or crutches? Will I need to take sitz baths to care for my incision? When will my cast be removed? How are we preventing the formation of blood clots? Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed? Are there any special precautions I should take to care for my vagina after this surgery? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? When can I take a shower? Will I have any drains, tubes and/or catheters put in during surgery and for how long? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? How did my procedure go? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? When will I start physical therapy and how often do I need to go? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? On the day of the surgery How are we going to manage my pain? What can I expect my pain to be like? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? How long will any swelling, tenderness, or discomfort in my vagina last? Do I need to do breathing exercises? Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots? When can I eat or drink? How will my vagina feel after this surgery in the short and long-term? When will my visitors be able to see me? How are we preventing the formation of blood clots? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? How will this surgery affect my bowel movements or ability to urinate? How long will it be until I wake up? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? How long will it take for my vagina to recover so that I can see its final shape? How did my procedure go? How long will my surgery take? On the day of the procedure Will I experience any change in sensations in my vaginal area after surgery? Preparation for surgery Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots? Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? Will this surgery affect my ability to get pregnant or deliver vaginally? When will my visitors be able to see me? How long will it be until I wake up? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? Will this surgery affect my sexual activity, and, if so, for how long? How long will my surgery take? What time should I arrive for my surgery? Preparing for your surgery When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? How long will this surgery take? Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Should I shower with antibacterial soap the night before and/or morning of surgery? Will I have any visible scars? Can you review my medication list with me? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Where and how big will my incision be? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? How much will the surgery cost? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? Can you review my medication list with me? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? How long will the results of the surgery last? How long will it be until I can go back to work? How long will it be until I can go back to work? How long will it be until I can drive again? Is it possible to have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time? What kind of sports or exercise limitations will I have? How long will it be until I can drive again? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? Will I need any special equipment (ie boot, crutches, etc) to help me after surgery? How long will I be in the clinic/hospital after my surgery? What are my options for the possible results of this surgery? Will I need physical therapy and for how long? Will I need any special clothing to wear for my thighs? Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long? What surgical approach will you use? Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What can I expect if I choose to delay this procedure? What can I expect my pain to be like? What can I expect my pain to be like? Will I need a cast after my surgery and for how long? What will my thighs feel like after surgery in the short and long-term? What can I expect if I choose not to have this procedure? Do you think I will need a blood transfusion during my surgery? How long will it take for my arm to recover so that I can see its final shape? How long will this surgery take? Are there any other surgical options? How long will any swelling, tenderness or discomfort last? What will my scar look like? Where and how big will my incision be? Will I have bandages after this surgery? What are my non-surgical options? What are the chances that my symptoms could return after this surgery? Will I have any visible scars? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? How will this surgery impact my movement or flexibility in the short and long-term? What will this surgery do? If I need a graft, where will it come from? Where and how big will my incision be? Will you use a bone graft, staples, or plates during my surgery? How long will this surgery take? How much will this surgery cost? What are the chances that I may need additional procedures after this surgery? How will this surgery benefit me? Will my surgery be arthroscopic or open? How long will the results of this surgery last? Is it possible to have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time? Will this surgery affect my movement and flexibility? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? What are the possible options for what my thighs may look like after my surgery? Can I have this surgery done on both thighs at the same time? How extensive will this surgery be? What surgical technique will you use? How will this surgery benefit me? Are there any other surgical options? What are my non-surgical options? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? What will this surgery do? Post-operative care/instructions Why do I need this surgery? Call you doctor if… After the procedure When can I resume sexual activity? When can I drive again? When can I go back to work? What can I expect if I choose to delay this surgery? What can my activity level be when I get home? What can I expect if I choose not to have any type of management for my injury? How soon would you recommend that I have this surgery? How long will I have to wear my dressings or bandages? Are there any other surgical options? Post-operative care What are my non-surgical options? Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed? After your procedure What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? How long do I need to wear a bandage? How often do I need to go for physical therapy, if needed? What will this surgery do? Do I have sutures that need to be removed? Why do I need this surgery? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? Do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? What are the different methods of treating extensor tendon injuries? When can I take a shower? Are there any special instructions for taking care of my procedure site? What happens when my extensor tendon is injured? How do I take care of my surgical site? What is an extensor tendon? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Do I have any prescriptions that need to be filled? How are we going to manage my pain? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? When will I be ready to leave the clinic/hospital? What can my activity level be today? How did my procedure go? Were any medications started or changed today? On the day of your procedure How does my incision look? How long will my procedure take? What’s the plan for today (labs, tests, procedures)? Preparing for your procedure When will I start physical therapy? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? How are we going to manage my pain? What time should I arrive for my procedure? What causes extensor tendon injuries? Do I need any tests done before this procedure? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? Can you review my medication list with me? Do I need to do breathing exercises? What kinds of anesthesia or sedation can I have for this procedure? When can I eat or drink? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? When can I have my drains or tubes removed? What are my options for pain medications after the procedure? What can I expect my pain to be like? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? Will I need any bandages after my procedure? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? How much will this procedure cost? How long will this procedure take? How did my procedure go? Will I have any visible scarring? During the procedure What are the chances that my skin tag could come back? Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? How will you remove my skin tag (ie. tying, freezing, burning, etc.)? Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots? What can I expect if I choose to delay this procedure? What will this procedure do? What can I expect if I choose not to have this procedure? When will my visitors be able to see me? How soon would you recommend that I have this procedure? How long will it be until I wake up? Do I have any other options? How long will my surgery take? What are the risks and possible complications of this procedure? Preparing for surgery What will this procedure do? Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? Post-operative care/instructions Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? Call the doctor if… What time should I arrive for my surgery? After the procedure When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? When can I drive again? What tests do I need to do before surgery? When can I go back to work? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? When can I resume sexual activity? Can you review my medication list with me? What can my activity level be when I get home? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? When will my sutures be removed? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? When will my bandages be removed? How long will it be until I can go back to work? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my face? How long will it be until I can drive again? How do I take care of my incision and face? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Why do I need this procedure? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? How are we going to manage my pain? Will I need physical therapy and for how long? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? When can I eat or drink? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? When can I have my drains or tubes removed? What can I expect my pain to be like? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? What will my grafted area look like in the long-term? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? Will I have any special dressings or bandages after this surgery and for how long? Post-operative care/instructions Call the doctor if… How long will this surgery take? How did my procedure go? After the procedure What will my scar look like? When can I resume my normal routine? On the day of your surgery Where and how big will my surgical site be? What can my activity level be when I get home? Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? How long will I have to wear my bandage? If my own skin is used, will I have a loss of sensation in the donor area? When will my visitors be able to see me? Do I have sutures that need to be removed? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? How long will it be until I wake up? Are there any special instructions for taking care of my procedure site? Will I need additional surgeries after this one? How long will my surgery take? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? What are the chances that my body could reject the graft? Preparing for Surgery Do I have any prescriptions that need to be filled? How are we going to manage my pain? How long should my graft last? When will I be ready to leave the clinic/hospital? Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? How did my procedure go? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? How thick will my graft be? On the day of the surgery What time should I arrive for my surgery? How long will my procedure take? What type of graft will you use? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? Preparing for surgery What tests do I need to do before surgery? Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? What can I expect if I choose to delay this surgery? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? Can you review my medication list with me? What time should I arrive for my procedure? What can I expect if I choose not to have this surgery? Do I need to do any tests before surgery? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? How soon would you recommend that I have this surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? Can you review my medication list with me? How long will it be until I can go back to work? What kinds of anesthesia or sedation can I have for this procedure? Are there any other surgical options? How long will it be until I can drive again? What are my options for pain medications after the procedure? What can I expect my pain to be like? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? How long will this procedure take? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? What will this surgery do? Will I have any visible scars? Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What can I expect my pain to be like? How will my face feel after this surgery in the short and long-term? How long will any swelling and bruising in my face last? How long will it take for my face to recover so that I can see its final shape? Will I have any dressings on my face after this surgery? Why do I need this surgery? Where and how big will my incision be? How much will this surgery cost? How long will the results of this surgery last? Can I have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? Will I have any visible scaring? Can I see different options for the possible results of my surgery? Where and how big will my incision be? Will I need additional skin biopsies after this one? What surgical approach will you use? What areas will you be performing the biopsy? Would you recommend a full facelift or a mini facelift? What type of biopsy will you be taking (ie. shave, punch, excision)? What can I expect if I choose to delay this procedure? Are there any other surgical options? What can I expect if I choose not to have this procedure? What are my non-surgical options? How soon would you recommend that I have this procedure? Do I have any other options? What are the risks of this surgery? What are the risks and possible complications of this procedure? What will this procedure do? What is the goal of this surgery? Why do I need this procedure? How will this surgery benefit me? Post-operative care/instructions Call the doctor if… After the procedure When can I drive again? When can I go back to work? When can I resume sexual activity? When can I resume exercise and contact sports? What can my activity level be when I get home? When will my bandages and splints be removed? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my face? How do I take care of my nose? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? How are we going to manage my pain? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? When can I eat or drink? When can I have my drains and tubes removed? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? How did my procedure go? On the day of the surgery Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots? When will my visitors be able to see me? How long will it be until I wake up? Preparing for surgery Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my surgery? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Can you review my medication list with me? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? How long will it be until I can go back to work? How long will it be until I can drive again? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? What will my scar look like? Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What can I expect my pain to be like? What are the chances that I will need another nose surgery after this one? How long will any swelling in my face last? How long will it take for my nose to recover so that I can see its final shape? Will I have bandages or a splint on my nose and for how long? Will this surgery affect my ability to breathe? What can I expect after my surgery? Do you think I will need a blood transfusion during my surgery? Where and how big will my incision be? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? Can I see different options for the possible results of my surgery? Are there any other surgical options? What are the risks of this surgery? What will this surgery do? Why do I need this surgery? Post-operative care/instructions Call your doctor if… After your procedure When can I drive again? When can I go back to work? When can I resume sexual activity? What can my activity level be when I get home? When will my staples or sutures be removed? When will my bandages be removed? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? How can I help reduce any discomfort around my ears? Are there any special instructions for caring for my ears? How do I take care of my incision? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? How are we going to manage my pain? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? When can I eat or drink? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? How did my procedure go? On the day of your procedure Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? When will my visitors be able to see me? How long will it be until I wake up? How long will my surgery take? Preparation for surgery Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my surgery? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Can you review my medication list with me? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? How long will it be until I can go back to work? How long will it be until I can drive again? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? Will I have any visible scars? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What can I expect my pain to be like? How long will any swelling and bruising last? How long will it take for my ears to recover so that I can see their final shape? Will I have any dressings on my ears after this surgery? What can I expect after my surgery? Where and how big will my incision be? How much will this surgery cost? How long will the results of this surgery last? Will this surgery affect my ability to hear? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? Can I see different options for the possible results of my surgery? Will both of my ears be operated on at the same time? Are there any other surgical options? What are my non-surgical options? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? What will this surgery do? Why do I need this surgery? Post-operative care/instructions Call your doctor if… After your procedure When can I resume sexual activity? When can I drive again? When can I go back to work? What can my activity level be when I get home? When will any bandages be removed? Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? When can I take a shower? How do I take care of my incision? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my neck? Are there any special instructions for caring for my neck? How do I take care of my incisions? How does my incision look? How are we going to manage my pain? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? When can I eat or drink? When can I have my drains or tubes removed? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? How did my procedure go? On the day of the surgery Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? When will my visitors be able to see me? How long will my surgery take? Preparing for your surgery Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my surgery? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Can you review my medication list with me? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? How long will it be until I can go back to work? How long will it be until I can drive again? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? Will I have any drains or tubes put in during surgery and for how long? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What can I expect my pain to be like? How long will it take for my neck to recover so that I can see its final shape? How long will any swelling and bruising in my neck last? How will my neck feel after this surgery in the short and long-term? Will my ability to swallow or eat be affected by this surgery? Will this surgery affect my facial movements and expressions? Will I have any bandages on my neck after this surgery? How long will this surgery take? Will I have any visible scars? Where and how big will my incision be? How much will the surgery cost? How long should the results of the surgery last? Can I have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? Can I see different options for the possible results of my surgery? How will my jawline be affected by this surgery? What surgical approach will you use? What can I expect if I choose to delay this procedure? What can I expect if I choose not to have this procedure? Are there any other surgical options? What are my non-surgical options? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? What will this surgery do? Why do I need this surgery? Post-operative management/instructions Call your doctor if… Post-operative care When can I resume sexual activity? When can I drive again? When can I go back to work? How long will I need to wear any abdominal support equipment? When will my staples or sutures be removed? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? What can my activity level be when I get home? When can I take a shower? How do I take care of my incision? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? What can my activity level be today? Were any medications started or changed today? How does my incision look? What’s the plan for today (labs, tests, procedures)? How are we going to manage my pain? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? Do I need to do breathing exercises? When can I eat or drink? When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed? How are we preventing the formation of blood clots? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? How did my procedure go? Before your surgery Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots? When will my visitors be able to see me? How long will it be until I wake up? How long will my surgery take? Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors? Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information? Do not drink alcohol 24 hours before your surgery? Stop smoking several weeks before your surgery? Stop eating and/or drinking as advised by your doctor? Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold) Call your doctor if you think of other questions? Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery? Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital? Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work? Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay? Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my surgery? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Can you review my medication list with me? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? How long will it be until I can go back to work? How long will it be until I can drive again? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? Will I have any visible scars? Will I need any special equipment to help support my belly after this surgery? Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What will my belly area feel like after surgery in the short and long-term? How long will any swelling, tenderness or discomfort last? Will I have bandages on my abdomen after this surgery? What can I expect after my surgery? How much will this surgery cost? Should I have this surgery if I am planning on having children in the future? Is it possible to also have liposuction done during this surgery? How long will the surgery last? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? Can I see options for the possible results of my surgery? Where and how big will my incision be? How extensive will this surgery be? What surgical technique will you use? Are there any other surgical options? What are my non-surgical options? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? What will this surgery do? Post-operative instructions Call you doctor if… After your procedure When can I drive again? When can I go back to work? When can I resume sexual activity? What can my activity level be when I get home? How long will I need to wear a special supportive bra? When will my staples or sutures be removed? When will my bandages be removed? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? Are there any special instructions for caring for my breasts? How do I take care of my incisions? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? How are we going to manage my pain? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? When can I eat or drink? When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? How did my procedure go? On the day of the surgery Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? When will my visitors be able to see me? How long will it be until I wake up? How long will my surgery take? Preparing for your surgery Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my surgery? Should I shower with antibacterial soap the night before and/or morning of surgery? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Can you review my medication list with me? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? How long will it be until I can go back to work? How long will it be until I can drive again? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? Will I have any visible scars? Will I need any special clothing after this surgery? Will I have any tubes, drains, and/or catheters put in during surgery and for how long? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What can I expect my pain to be like? Will this surgery affect my ability to breastfeed in the future? How will my breasts feel after surgery in the short and long-term? How long will any swelling last? Will I have bandages on my chest after this surgery? What can I expect after my surgery? How much will this surgery cost? Is it possible to also get implants during this surgery? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? Can I see options for the possible results of my surgery? Where and how big will my incision be? Post-operative care/instructions Why do I need this surgery? Call your doctor if… How long will the results of this surgery last? Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed? Are there any other surgical options? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? What are my non-surgical options? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? How are we going to manage my pain? What is the goal of this surgery? When will I be ready to leave the clinic/hospital? When can I take a shower? On the day of the surgery How long will my procedure take? Preparing for surgery Will I need someone to drive me home from the clinic/hospital? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my procedure? How will this surgery benefit me? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Can you review my medication list with me? What kinds of anesthesia or sedation can I have for this procedure? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? What are my options for pain medications after the procedure? What can I expect my pain to be like? Will I need to take any special precautions for my hair and head? Will I need any bandages after this procedure? How long will it be before I can shower with my new hair? How many times will I need to come in before the hair restoration process is complete? How long will this procedure take? Will I have any visible marks? Will I have an incision? If so, how big will it be? How much will this procedure cost? How long should the results last? How long will it be until I can see the final results? Where will you insert the hair grafts? Post-operative instructions Will I have any permanent hair loss in the donor area? Call the doctor if… Where will you take the hair grafts from? After Surgery What are the possible results for the different techniques? When can I drive again? What hair restoration technique will you use (ie. strip, follicular unit extraction)? When can I go back to work? When can I resume sexual activity? What can I expect if I choose not to have this procedure? What can my activity level be when I get home? How long do I need to wear any special supportive clothing? When will my sutures be removed? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? Are there any special precautions I should take? How do I take care of my incision? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? How are we going to manage my pain? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? When can I eat or drink? What are the possible results for the different techniques? When can I have my drains or tubes removed? What hair restoration technique will you use (ie. strip, follicular unit extraction)? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? What can I expect if I choose not to have this procedure? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? How soon would you recommend that I have this procedure? How did my procedure go? The Day of Surgery Do I have any other options? Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? What are the risks and possible complications of this procedure? Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots? What will this procedure do? When will my visitors be able to see me? How long will it be until I wake up? How long will my surgery take? Preparing for Surgery Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my surgery? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Can you review my medication list with me? Are there any activities I need to avoid after surgery? What is the cause of ganglion cyst? Why do I need surgery if the cyst can be removed using a simple needle? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? Some friends/family or my family doctor said I can smash the cyst with a large book. Can I do that? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? What are the different methods of treating a ganglion cyst? How long will it be until I can go back to work? What is a ganglion cyst? How long will it be until I can drive again? Call the doctor if… How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? Post-operative care Will I have any visible scars? When can I drive again? Will I need any special clothing to wear around my surgical area? When can I go back to work? Will I have any tubes, drains, and/or catheters put in during surgery and for how long? When can I resume sexual activity? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What can my activity level be when I get home? What can I expect my pain to be like? When will my staples or sutures be removed? How often do I need to go for physical therapy? How will the surgical area feel after surgery in the short and long-term? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? How long will it take for the surgical area to recover so that I can see its final shape? When can I use my affected hand or foot again? How long will any swelling, tenderness, and discomfort last? Will I have bandages after this surgery? What can I expect after my surgery? How do I take care of my incision? Where and how big will my incision be? How are we going to manage my pain? How much will this surgery cost? When can I eat or drink? What are the chances that I may need additional procedures after this surgery? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? How long will the results of this surgery last? How did my procedure go? On the day of the procedure Is it possible to have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time? Will this surgery affect my movement and flexibility? Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? What are the possible options for what I may look like after my surgery? How long will it be until I wake up? What is the maximum amount of fat that can be removed during this surgery? How long will my surgery take? Can I have liposuction done on different parts of my body during the same surgery? Preparation for surgery What surgical technique will you use (ie. tumescent liposuction, super-wet technique, ultrasound-assisted liposuction, etc)? Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? Are there any other surgical options? What time should I arrive for my surgery? Are there any other surgical options? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What are my non-surgical options? What tests do I need to do before surgery? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? What will this surgery do? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Post-operative care/instructions Can you review my medication list with me? Call your doctor if… After your procedure Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? When can I resume sexual activity? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? When can I drive again? When can I go back to work? How long will it be until I can go back to work? What can my activity level be when I get home? How long will I need to wear supportive apparel? (if applicable) How long will it be until I can drive again? Why do I need this surgery? Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed? When will my bandages be removed? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? When can I take a shower? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? Are there any special instructions for caring for my breasts? How do I take care of my incisions? Will I need physical therapy and for how long? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Will I have any tubes or packing put in during surgery and for how long? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? How are we going to manage my pain? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? When can I eat or drink? When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed? What can I expect my pain to be like? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? How long will this surgery take? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? Why do I need this procedure? What will my scar look like? How did my procedure go? Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms? How will this surgery impact my movement or flexibility and for how long? Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have? Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked? What are the chances that the cyst will come back after this surgery? Make sure you have confirmed the surgery you are having? Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth? How extensive will this surgery be? Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? What can I expect if I choose to delay or chose not to have this surgery? Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots? How soon would you recommend that I have this surgery? When will my visitors be able to see me? How long will it be until I wake up? What are my non-surgical options? How long will my surgery take? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? Preparation for surgery Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? What will this surgery do? Post-operative management/instructions Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my surgery? Call your doctor if… After the procedure When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? When can I resume sexual activity? When can I drive again? What tests do I need to do before surgery? When can I go back to work? What can my activity level be when I get home? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Do I have sutures that need to be removed? Can you review my medication list with me? When will my bandages be removed? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? Call your doctor if… Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? When can I take a shower? Before I get discharged What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? After your procedure Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? How long will it be until I can go back to work? How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my face? When can I drive again? Are there any special instructions for caring for my face? How do I take care of my incisions? When can I go back to work? How does my incision look? How long will it be until I can drive again? How are we going to manage my pain? When can I resume sexual activity? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the clinic/hospital? When can I eat or drink? Are there any limitations? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? How did my procedure go? Will I need any supportive apparel after this surgery? What can my activity level be when I get home? On the day of your surgery What can my activity level be when I get home? Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? When will my staples or sutures be removed? When will my visitors be able to see me? When will my bandages be removed? How long will it be until I wake up? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? How long will my surgery take? Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long? Preparing for surgery Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my face? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What time should I arrive for my surgery? Are there any special instructions for caring for my face? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What can I expect my pain to be like? How do I take care of my incisions? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Will this surgery affect any future tests I may have? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Can you review my medication list with me? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? How will my breasts feel after surgery in the short and long-term? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? How are we going to manage my pain? How long will any swelling last? How long will it be until I can go back to work? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? How long will it be until I can drive again? Will I have bandages on my chest after this surgery? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? When can I eat or drink? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? How long will this surgery take? What can I expect my pain to be like? How will my face feel after this surgery in the short and long-term? How are we preventing the formation of blood clots? How much will this surgery cost? How long will it take for my face to recover so that I can see its final shape? How long will any swelling, tenderness and discomfort in my face last? How often do you do this type of surgery? Will I have bandages after this surgery? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? Will I have any visible scars? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? Where and how big will my incision be? Can I see options for the possible results of my surgery? How much will the surgery cost? How did my procedure go? How long will the results of the surgery last? Will I have any visible scars? How will my ability to eat be affected in the short-term? On the day of the surgery Will this surgery affect my facial movements and expressions? Where and how big will my incision be? Is it possible to have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? What are the chances that I could need any additional procedures done during this surgery (ie. liposuction around arms and underarms)? What are the possible options for what my chin may look like after my surgery? Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? How will my chin be affected by this surgery? What are my options for how much my breast size can be reduced? How long will this surgery take? How long will the results of this surgery last? When will my visitors be able to see me? What surgical technique will you use? Are there any other surgical options? How long will my surgery take? What are my non-surgical options? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? What will this surgery do? Why do I need this surgery? Before the surgery Preparing for surgery Are there any other surgical options? Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What are my non-surgical options? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? What time should I arrive for my surgery? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What tests do I need to do before surgery? What will this surgery do? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Can you review my medication list with me? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? How long will it be until I can go back to work? How long will it be until I can drive again? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? Why do I need this surgery? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? Will I have any visible scars? Why do I need this surgery? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What can I expect my pain to be like? How will my face feel after this surgery in the short and long-term? How long will any swelling and bruising in my face last? How long will it take for my face to recover so that I can see its final shape? What are the different methods of treating flexor tendon injuries? What happens when my flexor tendon is injured? What is an flexor tendon? What causes flexor tendon injuries? Post-operative care/instructions Call the doctor if… Care after surgery When can I resume sexual activity? When can I drive again? When can I go back to work? What can my activity level be when I get home? How long will I need to use any special equipment, such as a boot or crutches? When will my cast be removed? Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? When can I take a shower? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? When will I start physical therapy and how often do I need to go? How are we going to manage my pain? Post-operative care/instructions What needs to happen before I can be discharged? Call your doctor if… How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? After your procedure Do I need to do breathing exercises? When can I drive again? When can I eat or drink? How are we preventing the formation of blood clots? When can I go back to work? When can I resume sexual activity? What can my activity level be when I get home? When will my staples or sutures be removed? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? Will I have any dressings on my face after this surgery? When will my bandages be removed? How much will this surgery cost? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? How long will the results of this surgery last? How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my face? How did my procedure go? Are there any special instructions for caring for my face? Can I have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time? On the day of the surgery How do I take care of my incisions? Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? When will my visitors be able to see me? How are we going to manage my pain? How long will it be until I wake up? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? Will this surgery affect my facial movements and expressions? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? How long will my surgery take? When can I eat or drink? Can I see different options for the possible results of my surgery? How are we preventing the formation of blood clots? How will my hairline be affected by this surgery? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? Where and how big will my incisions be? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? What surgical approach will you use? Preparing for surgery How did my procedure go? On the day of the surgery Are there any other surgical options? Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? When will my visitors be able to see me? How long will my surgery take? What time should I arrive for my surgery? What are my non-surgical options? Preparing for surgery Should I shower with antibacterial soap the night before and/or morning of surgery? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? What will this surgery do? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What time should I arrive for my surgery? What tests do I need to do before surgery? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Can you review my medication list with me? Can you review my medication list with me? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? How long will it be until I can go back to work? How long will it be until I can go back to work? Post-operative care/instructions How long will it be until I can drive again? How long will it be until I can drive again? Call your doctor if… How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? What kind of sports or exercise limitations will I have? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? Will I have any visible scars? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? After your surgery What are my options for pain medications after surgery? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? What can I expect my pain to be like? Will I need any special equipment (ie boot, crutches, etc.) to help me after surgery? How will my face feel after this surgery in the short and long-term? When can I resume sexual activity? How long will any swelling and bruising in my face last? Will I need physical therapy and for how long? When can I drive again? How long will it take for my face to recover so that I can see its final shape? Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long? Will I have any dressings on my face after this surgery? When can I go back to work? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? How much will this surgery cost? What can my activity level be when I get home? How long will the results of this surgery last? What can I expect my pain to be like? How long will I need to wear a special supportive bra? Can I have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time? Will I need a cast after my surgery and for how long? Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? Will this surgery affect my facial movements and expressions? Do you think I will need a blood transfusion during my surgery? When will my bandages be removed? Can I see different options for the possible results of my surgery? How long will this surgery take? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? How will my hairline be affected by this surgery? When can I take a shower? What will my scar look like? Where and how big will my incisions be? Are there any special instructions for caring for my breasts? What surgical approach will you use? Are there any other surgical options? How do I take care of my incisions? What are my non-surgical options? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? What will this surgery do? How are we going to manage my pain? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? Where and how big will my incision be? When can I eat or drink? When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? How did my procedure go? What are the chances that my symptoms could return after this surgery? On the day of the surgery Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots? When will my visitors be able to see me? How long will it be until I wake up? How will this surgery impact my movement or flexibility in the short and long-term? How long will my surgery take? If I need a graft, where will it come from? Preparing for your surgery Will you use a bone graft, staples, or plates during my surgery? Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my surgery? Will my surgery be arthroscopic or open? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What can I expect if I choose to delay this surgery? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Why do I need this surgery? What can I expect if I choose not to have any type of management for my injury? Can you review my medication list with me? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? How soon would you recommend that I have this surgery? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? How long will it be until I can go back to work? Are there any other surgical options? How long will it be until I can drive again? What are my non-surgical options? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? What will this surgery do? Will I need any special clothing after this surgery? Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What can I expect my pain to be like? Will this surgery affect any future tests I may have? Will this surgery affect my ability to breastfeed in the future? How will my breasts feel after surgery in the short and long-term? How long will any swelling last? Will I have bandages on my chest after this surgery? How long will this surgery take? How much will this surgery cost? How often do you do this type of surgery? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? Can I see options for the possible results of my surgery? Will I have any visible scars? Where and how big will my incisions be? What are the chances that I could need any additional procedures done during this surgery (ie. liposuction around arms and underarms)? How extensive will this surgery be? Why do I need this surgery? Why do I need this surgery? What are my options for how much my breast size can be reduced? How long will the results of this surgery last? Are there any other surgical options? Aftercare Call your doctor if… When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? When can I take a shower? Are there any special precautions I should take? How do I take care of my procedural area? Are there any other surgical options? Preparing for your surgery Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my procedure? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? Will I have any pain during or after this procedure? How long will this procedure take? Will I have any visible marks from the acid treatment? How much will this procedure cost? What are my non-surgical options? How long will the results last? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? Can I see options for the possible results of different acids? Is it possible to have varying results? Where will you do the chemical peel? How soon would you recommend that I have this procedure? What are my surgical options? Are there any other non-surgical options? What are the risks and possible complications of this procedure? What will a chemical peel do? What will this surgery do? Post-operative care/instructions Call your doctor if… After your surgery When can I resume sexual activity? When can I drive again? When can I go back to work? Why do I need this? What can my activity level be when I get home? Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed? When will my bandages be removed? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? When can I take a shower? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my face? Are there any special instructions for caring for my face? How do I take care of my incisions? How does my incision look? How are we going to manage my pain? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the clinic/hospital? When can I eat or drink? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? Why do I need this surgery? How did my procedure go? On the day of the surgery Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? When will my visitors be able to see me? How long will my surgery take? Preparing for your surgery Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my surgery? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Can you review my medication list with me? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? How long will it be until I can go back to work? How long will it be until I can drive again? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What can I expect my pain to be like? How long will this surgery take? Will I have any visible scars? Where and how big will my incision be? How will my face feel after this surgery in the short and long-term? How long will any swelling and bruising in my face last? How long will it take for my face to recover so that I can see its final shape? Will I have any dressings on my face after this surgery? How much will the surgery cost? How long will the results of the surgery last? Can I have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? Will this surgery affect my facial movements and expressions? Can I see different options for the possible results of my surgery? How will my eyes be affected by this surgery? What surgical approach will you use? Are there any other surgical options? What are my non-surgical options? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? What will this surgery do? Why do I need this surgery? Post-operative care instructions Call your doctor if… After your surgery When can I drive again? When can I go back to work? When can I resume sexual activity? What can my activity level be when I get home? How long will I need to wear a special supportive bra? When will my sutures be removed? When will my bandages be removed? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? Do I need to take any special precautions? Are there any special instructions for caring for my breasts? How do I take care of my incision? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? How are we going to manage my pain? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? When can I eat or drink? When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? How did my procedure go? On the day of the surgery Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? When will my visitors be able to see me? How long will it be until I wake up? How long will my surgery take? Preparing for your surgery Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my surgery? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Can you review my medication list with me? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? How long will it be until I can go back to work? How long will it be until I can drive again? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? Will I need any special clothing after this surgery? Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What can I expect my pain to be like? Will this surgery affect any future tests I may have? How will my breasts feel after surgery in the short and long-term? How long will any swelling last? Will I have bandages on my chest after this surgery? What can I expect after my surgery? Will I have any visible scars? Where and how big will my incision be? How long will the results of the surgery last? If the tissue expander technique will be used, how long will the entire reconstruction process take? Will you need to use tissue from any other part of my body to reconstruct my breast? What technique would you recommend for me and why? Can I see before and after pictures? Can I see options for the possible results of the different reconstructions? What are my options for reconstruction techniques? If both breasts need to be reconstructed, will you do them at the same time? Is it possible to have my breast look like it did prior to my mastectomy? What can I expect if I choose to delay this surgery? What can I expect if I choose not to have this surgery? Should I wait to have my breast reconstruction until after my cancer treatment is completed? How soon after my mastectomy can I have my reconstruction surgery? What are my non-surgical options? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? What will this surgery do? Why do I need this surgery? Post-operative care Call your Doctor if… After your surgery When will my staples or sutures be removed? Do I need to follow up with my cancer doctors? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? When can I drive again? When can I go back to work? When can I resume sexual activity? What can my activity level be when I get home? How do I take care of my incision? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? How are we going to manage my pain? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? When can I eat or drink? When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed? How are we preventing the formation of blood clots? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? How much of the cancer were you able to remove? How did my procedure go? On the day of the surgery Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots? When will my family be able to see me? How long will it be until I wake up? How long will my surgery take? Before Surgery Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my surgery? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Can you review my medication list with me? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? How long will it be until I can go back to work? How long will it be until I can drive again? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? Who should I contact to help coordinate my care between all of my care providers? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? What will my scar look like? Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What can I expect my pain to be like? What can I expect after my surgery? Do you think I will need a blood transfusion during my surgery? Where and how big will my incision be? What are my options for breast reconstruction? How much of my breast will be affected? How extensive will this surgery be? Will I need any other treatments before or after this surgery (chemotherapy, radiation, etc)? When will the pathology results be back? Will any lymph nodes need to be removed during this surgery? What new information will we learn about my cancer after this surgery? How often do you do this type of surgery here? What are the risks of this surgery? Do I need any genetic testing done? How will this surgery affect my quality of life in the short-term and the long-term? How will this surgery improve my survival? What is the goal of this surgery? What can I expect if I choose to delay this surgery? What can I expect if I choose not to have this surgery? How soon would you recommend that I have this surgery? Are there any other surgical options? What are my non-surgical options? What will this surgery do? Why do I need this surgery? Post-operative care Call your doctor if… After your surgery When can I resume sexual activity? When can I drive again? When can I go back to work? What can my activity level be when I get home? How long will I need to wear a special supportive bra? Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed? When will my bandages be removed? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? When can I take a shower? Are there any special instructions for caring for my breasts? How do I take care of my incisions? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? How are we going to manage my pain? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? When can I eat or drink? When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? How did my procedure go? On the day of the surgery Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots? When will my visitors be able to see me? How long will it be until I wake up? How long will my surgery take? Surgery Day Arrangements Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my surgery? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Can you review my medication list with me? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? How long will it be until I can go back to work? How long will it be until I can drive again? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? Will I need any special clothing after this surgery? Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What can I expect my pain to be like? Will this surgery affect any future tests I may have? Will this surgery affect my ability to breastfeed in the future? How will my breasts feel after surgery in the short and long-term? How long will any swelling last? Will I have bandages on my chest after this surgery? How long will this surgery take? How much will this surgery cost? How often do you do this type of surgery? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? Can I see options for the possible results of my surgery? Will I have any visible scars? Where and how big will my incisions be? What are the chances that I could need any additional procedures done during this surgery (ie. breast lift)? Can I have breast implants again in the future? How extensive will this surgery be? Are there any other surgical options? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? What will this surgery do? FAQ Breast Implant Removal Why do I need this surgery? Post-operative management Call your doctor if… When can I drive again? When can I go back to work? When can I resume sexual activity? What can my activity level be when I get home? How long will I need to wear a special supportive bra? When will my sutures be removed? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? Do I need to take any special precautions? Are there any special instructions for caring for my breasts? How do I take care of my incisions? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? How are we going to manage my pain? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? When can I eat or drink? When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? How did my procedure go? On the day of your surgery Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? When will my visitors be able to see me? How long will it be until I wake up? How long will my surgery take? Preparing for your surgery Call your doctor if… Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? After the procedure Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? What time should I arrive for my surgery? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? How did my procedure go? Can you review my medication list with me? Preparing for your procedure Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? How long will my procedure take? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? How long will it be until I can drive again? What time should I arrive for my procedure? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? Will this surgery affect my sexual activity, and, if so, for how long? Will there be any pain? If so, to what degree? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? How long will I have to stay after my procedure? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? Will I have any visible scars? How long will this procedure take? Will I need any special clothing after this surgery? Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long? Will I have any visible marks from the injection sites? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? How much will this procedure cost? What can I expect my pain to be like? How long will the results last? Will this surgery affect any future tests I may have like mammograms? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? Will this surgery affect my ability to breastfeed in the future? Can I see options for the possible results of different injectables? How will my breasts feel after surgery in the short and long-term? Is it possible to have varying results? How long will any swelling last? Will I have bandages on my chest after this surgery? Where will you inject the product? How much will this surgery cost? How soon would you recommend that I have this procedure? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? Can I see options for the possible results of my surgery? Are there any other options? Where and how big will my incision be? How long will the results of this surgery last? What are my choices for the type of implant that will be placed? What options do I have for implant size? What are the risks and possible complications of this procedure? Where in my chest will you place the implants? Are there any other surgical options? What are the risks of this surgery? What will this surgery do? Why do I need this surgery? What will this procedure do? Post-operative care You should call us or your family MD or go to emergency if this is the case. After Surgery When can I drive again? When can I go back to work? When can I resume sexual activity? What can my activity level be when I get home? When will my sutures be removed? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my face? How do I take care of my incisions and my eyes? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? How are we going to manage my pain? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? When can I eat or drink? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? How did my procedure go? Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? When will my visitors be able to see me? How long will my surgery take? Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my surgery? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Can you review my medication list with me? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? How long will it be until I can go back to work? How long will it be until I can drive again? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? Will I have any visible scars? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What can I expect my pain to be like? How long will any swelling or bruising in my face last? How long will it take for my eyelids to recover so that I can see their final shape? Will I have any dressings on my eyelids after this surgery? Will I be able to wear my contact lenses after this surgery? What are the chances that this cancer will recur after treatment? Will my vision be affected by this surgery? What are the risks and possible complications of your treatment recommendation? How will this surgery affect my eyelid movements in the short-term and long-term? How soon do you recommend that I have treatment for this condition? Where and how big will my incision be? What treatment plan do you recommend? How much will this surgery cost? How long will the results of this surgery last? Can I have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time? What are my surgical and non-surgical options? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? Are my family members at risk for this type of skin cancer? Can I see different options for the possible results of my surgery? Will this surgery affect my ability to blink? Should I take special precautions when I am in the sun? Will both of my eyes be operated on at the same time? Will both my upper and lower eyelids be operated on during this surgery? What are the risks to my health if I chose not to treat this condition? Does it need to be treated? Would surgery be my only option? What is the next step now that my biopsy results are available? What will this surgery do? Is this a diagnosis of cancer or is this a benign diagnosis? What will this surgery do? Why do I need this surgery? What is basal cell carcinoma? Post-operative care Call your doctor if.. After Surgery When can I resume sexual activity? When can I drive again? When can I go back to work? How long will I need to wear any abdominal support equipment? When will my staples or sutures be removed? When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment? What can my activity level be when I get home? When can I take a shower? How do I take care of my incision? Are there any medications that I need to avoid? Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled? What can my activity level be today? Were any medications started or changed today? How does my incision look? What’s the plan for today (labs, tests, procedures)? How are we going to manage my pain? What needs to happen before I can be discharged? How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital? Do I need to do breathing exercises? When can I eat or drink? When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed? How are we preventing the formation of blood clots? When can we restart my usual prescription medications? When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery? How did my procedure go? Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections? Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots? When will my visitors be able to see me? How long will it be until I wake up? How long will my surgery take? Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital? Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital? What time should I arrive for my surgery? When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery? What tests do I need to do before surgery? Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications? Can you review my medication list with me? Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery? What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure? How long will it be until I can go back to work? How long will it be until I can drive again? How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine? How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery? Will I have any visible scars? Will I need any special equipment to help support my belly after this surgery? Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long? What are my options for pain medications after surgery? What will my belly area feel like after surgery in the short and long-term? How long will any swelling, tenderness or discomfort last? Will I have bandages on my abdomen after this surgery? What can I expect after my surgery? How long will this surgery take? How much will this surgery cost? Should I have this surgery if I am planning on having children in the future? Is it possible to also have liposuction done during this surgery? How long will the surgery last? Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work? Can I see options for the possible results of my surgery? Where and how big will my incision be? How extensive will this surgery be? What surgical technique will you use? Are there any other surgical options? What are my non-surgical options? What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery? What will this surgery do? Why do I need this surgery?

Are There Criteria For Choosing My Desired Implant?


Choosing your desired implant for surgery depends on quite a number of multiple factors which include your native breast dimension (height and width) , projection, rib cage width, body anatomy, volume, the thickness of tissue, how you want the breast to look like after surgery. The most effective way of choosing implant size is to try out sizers from your surgeon while wearing a tight body fit.

How Is The Actual Weight Of Breast Implants?


In cases of implant weights, the bigger the implants the more they will likely weigh. The size of 100 cc silicone implant generally weighs 0.23 lbs while that of the saline implant with size 100 cc weighs 0.21 lbs. Going bigger in size, a 300 cc silicone implant weighs 0.69 pounds and a pair weighs 1.38 pounds. 300 cc saline implants weigh 0.63 lb and a pair weighs 1.26 lbs. In this case, implants weigh almost the same as the exact amount that an actual breast tissue would weigh. 

In most cases, the weight varies slightly depending on the manufacturers. There might be a slight weight variation from different manufacturers.

At An Earlier Phase Of Breast Augmentation, Will Implants Make Breasts Sag?


Whether or not a person performs a breast augmentation, the genetic makeup of the individual has a major role to play in the contribution of breast sag. Factors such as weight (increasing or decreasing), gravity, age, skin elasticity & ethnicity have a lot to do when it comes to breast augmentation sagging. In this case, use a very good supportive bra that will help you to reduce the effect of sagging.

Is The Lifespan Of Breast Implants Up To 12 Years?


The lifespan of breast implant is not actually guaranteed as it is not predictable when the implant lifecycle will eventually end. In which case, no matter how your counseling process has been with your surgeon before the operation, always bear in mind that you cannot have a breast implant that will last a lifetime. 

There is no set expiry date attached to breast implants because there has not been a reason to get them replaced unless there is a possible rupture or have other problems. Most times implants exceed more than 12 years and even last up to 30 years in some cases.  

Will Gummy Bear Implants Last Longer Than The Others?


There are quite a number of new implants that have been introduced for breast augmentation and are known as “jelly bean”, “gummy bear”, or “highly cohesive gel” implants that are also available for breast augmentation and they have a firmer feeling, but there are no effective long term results to indicate that they are much better or tend to last longer than the saline or silicone implants.  

Where Is Breast Augmentation Carried Out?


Breast augmentation is normally performed in our Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities. It also has certification by the College of Physicians and Surgeon OHP program.

Is Breast Augmentation Hurtful?


Since the surgery is under general anesthesia, there is no pain during the procedure. 

The greatest period of discomfort for the patient is usually the first twenty-four to forty-eight hours after breast augmentation surgery. Afterward, pains will reduce and there will be no need for too much pain relievers as usual. We do a 24-hour recovery routine that most patients have a very little discomfort after 24 hours. In the case where breast implants are placed in the submuscular position, there will initially cause more discomfort than when it is placed in the subglandular pocket ( in front of the muscle).

Which Anesthesia Is Preferably Used During Breast Augmentation?


In the case of breast augmentation, general anesthesia is commonly used. This will guarantee a painless procedure and also the surgeon can concentrate to deliver his best surgical result. 

Post-operative care/instructions


Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
Yes, arrange for help driving, heavy lifting, and caring for pets for the first few days.

Call your doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your procedure site
  • You have persistent stiffness, numbness/tingling, or weakness in the procedural area
  • You have pain that you cannot control

What can my activity level be when I get home?


In general, all medication that may cause bleeding or prolong bleeding time may need to be stopped or alter. One should not stop any medication without consulting with your family physician and the specialist that put you on these drugs.

Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
History and physical, EKG, CBC, and metabolic panel for patients over 55 years of age. Thyroid panel for patients with thyroid disorders.

Will I need to wear any protective garments following my procedure?


Yes, your medication list will be reviewed during your consultation and your pre-operative appointments. Please notify your surgeon of any changes or new medications at your preoperative appointment.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


You will meet with the anesthesiologist prior to the surgery in the preoperative area. You may arrange to speak to an anesthesiologist by telephone prior to your surgery date.

How did my procedure go?


I usually like the procedure to be done under general anesthesia.

Make sure your procedure has been confirmed?


Majority of my patients are outpatients. You will be able to leave the hospital when you are ready


How long will my procedure take?


I do not usually use drain after the procedure. However, if there may be a lot of drainage after the procedure, a small drain may be placed.

Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
You will be given a special garment that needs to be wrapped around your bodys. Other than that, it is suggested that patients wear loose and comfortable clothing

Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
Majority of my patients are outpatients. You will be able to leave the hospital when you are ready

Make sure the correct site and side of your procedure has been marked
After 2-3 weeks, patients are able to return back to their normal routine

Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and feel able to drive.

Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms
Most patients return to work around 2-3 weeks after the surgery but if your work requires a lot of sitting, a cushion/pillow is suggested to help reduce any discomfort

Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information?


You will be given mild narcotic during the first few days after surgery follow by extra strength Tylenol after a few days.

Call your doctor if you think of other questions?


It will be moderate but you will be given pain medication to help manage with this

Will I need someone to drive me home from your clinic?


In the short run, you will feel temporary pain, swelling, soreness, numbness, bruising and tiredness. All of these side effects will subside after a month of recovery

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


It will take around a year to have full recovery but only a couple of months to look presentable

What time should I arrive for my procedure?


The swelling usually subsides after 2-3 weeks

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


Yes

What can I expect my pain to be like?


The loose skin cannot be removed without leaving scars but there will be an attempt to hide these scars

How will my procedural area feeling the short and long-term?


The incisions will be made at the inner body or the posterior portion of the body. It is not possible to do this surgery without making a long incision

How long will I have to stay after my procedure?


The surgery could take around 1-3 hours depending on the size and work needed to be done on the patient

How long will this procedure take?


You can discuss cost during the initial consultation after the examination it will be determine whether additional works needs to be done.

How long will it take before my procedural area to recover so that I can see its final shape?


Additional surgery is usually not needed as long as the patient does not gain excessive weight over the period of time

Will I have any swelling, tenderness or discomfort in my procedural area?


It should last for a long time, as long as patients maintain a healthy diet and regular exercise, however as the patient ages, the body will accumulate fat more easily and their skin will loose its firmness

Will I have any visible marks from the laser?


Yes. It is advised that liposuction is combined with a body lift to produce the most optimal results

How much will the procedure cost?


It should not affect movement or flexibility on the long run, however during the recovery period, the level of activity should be low

What are the chances that I may need additional procedures after this one?


Please refer to my website or feel free to ask me during consultation

How long will the results of this procedure last?


Your body will be a little bit slimmer but the change will not be drastic. You will have tighter skin than before, less cellulite and an improvement in the texture/firmness of your skin. The degree of these results will vary from patient to patient.

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


Yes

What are the possible options for what my procedural area may look like after my procedure?


Depending on the amount of excess skin and cellulite you have. It is an invasive surgery and will require general anesthesia.

What areas can you perform the skin tightening/body contouring treatment on?


An incision will be made at different sites of the body, where loose skin will be removed and sutured back together in order to tighten the skin. Additionally, small amount of fat and soft tissue will be removed and the muscles of the body will be tightened. This will overall reduce the appearance of wrinkles and improve the texture of the skin

What are my surgical options?


Liposculpture

Are there any other non-surgical options?


You may use topical cream or laser treatments that will tighten the skin or tries to reduce the appearance of cellulite. Additionally, a healthy lifestyle and commitment to exercise could benefit the patient or control garments

What are the risks and possible complications of this procedure?


The patient’s skin may have rippling, bagginess or experience pigment changes and asymmetry. Another possible but unlikely risk/complications is fluid retention/loss, shock, infections, bleeding, reaction to anesthesia, and permanent numbness.

Post-operative care/instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Keep your incision clean and dry
  • Take sitz baths several times a day to ease pain and discomfort
  • Do not use tampons or douche for as long as your doctor advises
  • Avoid straining or bearing down during urination
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

Call your doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • You have difficulty or pain when urinating
  • You have nausea or vomiting that cannot be controlled
  • Your dressing is repeatedly soaked with blood
  • You feel excessive swelling and pressure around your pelvic area
  • You have persistent numbness or tingling in your pelvic area
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

 

After your procedure


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

When can I resume sexual activity?


It is recommended that you avoid engaging in sexual activity for 6 weeks.

 

When can I drive again?


You can drive once you are off your narcotic medication.

When can I go back to work?


You may resume work again after 3-7 days.

Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity?


Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.

Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities?


Yes

What can my activity level be when I get home?


It is recommended that you have 2-3 days of complete bed rest and have someone take over the duties within the house.

Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises?


You can call my office if you have any other questions.

Follow your doctor’s instructions on wearing any supportive equipment for your thighs?


You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.

Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed?


The sutures are dissolvable, meaning they do not need to be removed, they will remove on their own.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


I usually prefer to see my patient 1-2 days after the surgery.

Keep your incision clean and dry?


Yes, you cannot drive yourself home after facelift.

When can I take a shower?


It is suggested you take a shower a day after the surgery but if you do need to take a shower, avoid the vaginal area.

Follow your doctor’s instructions on caring for any drains you may go home with?


Yes, arrange for help driving, heavy lifting, and caring for pets for the first few days.

How often should I take sitz baths?


You should take one next morning after the surgery and multiple times a day

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Yes, you will receive a list of medications to avoid prior to surgery and initially after surgery. Do not take NSAIDS, ibuprofen, or aspirin until your doctor approves.

Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery?


You may resume sexual activity at two to three weeks.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


Tell the doctor or nurse which pharmacy you prefer. Non-narcotic medications such as Compazine may be sent electronically but narcotic pain medications must be printed and hand delivered to the pharmacy.

Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications?


You may resume most daily activities within a week from surgery. You should avoid heavy lifting or things that can elevate your blood pressure.

How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my vagina?


Apply ice onto the area to reduce swelling and take prescribed pain medication.

Take pain and other medications as prescribed?


Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises

You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control?


How do I take care of my incision(s)?


A sterile cloth containing antibiotic cream will be inserted into your vagina, it will be removed by the patient after 24 hours. Afterwards, the patient will need to apply topical medication and properly clean/dry their vagina (avoid baths).

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will receive pain pill prescription to fill prior to surgery.

You have persistent numbness/tingling in your legs?


Your bandages are repeatedly soaked with blood?


What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to have instructions reviewed with a responsible adult and you must meet all discharge criteria.

You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision?


How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


My procedure is usually as an outpatient and you will be staying for a few hours after. I only let my patient go home if they are ready.

You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision?


When can I eat or drink?


You may eat and drink after surgery as soon as you feel well and not nauseated. Start with a soft, bland diet.

You have shortness of breath or chest pain?


When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed?


My usual protocol does not use drains, tubes or catheters because I use special closure technique to decrease the needs of these devices.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


Discuss with your surgeon.

You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit?


When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


The antibiotics are stopped within 48 hours of surgery.

Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy?


Yes

Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy?


Yes

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room?


Yes. If you cannot reach the doctor immediately, call 911.

On the day of the surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
  • Make sure you have confirmed the surgery you are having
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

 

Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication?


Yes

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


You will receive IV antibiotic immediately prior to surgery start and additional doses if the surgery last 6 hours. The antibiotic dosing follows the national surgical site infection protocol.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


Usually in the recovery room, within an hour of your surgery ending.

How long will it be until I wake up?


You will be awake during the surgery and will receive local numbing in and outside the vagina.

Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care?


Yes

How long will my surgery take?


The surgery should take around 1-2 hours.

When can I resume sexual activity?


Yes

How long will my surgery take?


When can I drive again?


Yes

Preparing for your surgery


  • Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay
  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital
  • Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • No eating or drinking 6 hours before surgery.
  • Do not drink alcohol 24 hours prior to surgery. Do not smoke at least 6 weeks prior to surgery.
  • My contact information can be found on my website or at the office.
    Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors
  • Wear loose clothing to the clinic/hospital
  • Make sure to buy any equipment you may need for sitz baths as advised by your doctor

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


It is a good idea to have someone drive you home.

When can I go back to work?


You may resume sexual activity at two to three weeks.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


This can be found on the website, on our mobile app, or call our office directly.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and you feel capable of driving.

How long do I need to wear any special supportive clothing?


For most clients, you may return to work after one week. If you need to do heavy lifting the time requirement may be longer.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


We recommend that you arrive 1 hour and 30 minutes before your surgery. We will also try you on your mobile phone if the time of surgery has been changed.

Do I have sutures that need to be removed?


You should avoid bending over or heavy lifting for two weeks.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


It is suggested that you don’t eat 6 hours before the surgery.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


For my patients, general lab tests such as CBC, electrolytes, liver function, INR, PTT, cardiogram are fairly routine, Other tests may be ordered if one has special medical condition.

Questions to Ask After My Surgery


When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?
Your sutures will be removed about 7 to 10 days after your surgery.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


In general, all medication that may cause bleeding or prolong bleeding time may need to be stopped or alter. One should not stop any medication without consulting with your family physician and the specialist that put you on these drugs.

When can I take a shower?


Your bandages will be removed at your first follow-up appointment.

Can you review my medication list with me?


I review all patient medications on initial consultation, pre-operative appointment and day of surgery.

How do I take care of my incision?


You will follow up a day or two after surgery. Following this weekly appointment until you are fully recovered.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


All my patients see the anesthesiologist before but usually on the day of surgery. For one who has special needs, I frequently arrange for consultation with anesthesiologist a few days before surgery.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


You can take your first shower the day after surgery.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


This will be discussed with by my anesthesiologist. My procedure is usually done under general anesthesia/local freezing.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


Yes, the postoperative instructions will be reviewed at your preoperative appointment. After the initial bandage is removed, apply polysporin or vitamin E to your incisions twice daily.

Call your doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • You notice that the skin on your affected foot is pale or has an unusual color
  • You are unable to move the toes on your affected foot
  • You cannot feel the toes on your affected foot
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control
  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Keep your incision clean and dry
  • Keep your foot elevated when sitting or lying down and apply ice to it to reduce swelling as advised by your doctor
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on caring for your cast and foot
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions regarding putting weight on the affected foot
  • Attend physical therapy appointments as long as advised by your doctor
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


Patients can return to their routine within 3-7 days after the surgery.

How are we going to manage my pain?


You may shower after the first postoperative visit. Use a gentle shampoo to wash your hair such as baby shampoo. Pat dry and apply polysporin ointment if you like. Please wash your hand prior to touching your wound.

After the procedure


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy
  • Do not put weight on your affected foot as long as advised by your doctor

How long will it be until I can drive again?


You can drive once you are off your narcotic medication..

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


Yes, you will receive a list of medications to avoid prior to surgery and initially after surgery. Do not take NSAIDS, ibuprofen, or aspirin until your doctor approves.

When can I resume sexual activity?


There is no restrictions to sexual activity after surgery.

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


Tell the doctor or nurse which pharmacy you prefer. Non-narcotic medications such as Compazine may be sent electronically but narcotic pain medications must be printed and hand delivered to the pharmacy.

When can I drive again?


This is dependent on the complexity of the injury and surgery.  It is advised that you have a friend/family member drive you home after surgery.  Additionally, driving and operating heavy machinery should be avoided if you are taking any prescription pain medications.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


Patients can return to their normal routine within 3-7 days after the surgery.

When can I go back to work?


Depending on the complexity of your surgery, you may return to work as soon as 1-2 days after surgery or 3-4 weeks after surgery.   You may need some of your tasks at work to be modified for some time during the recovery process.

When can I eat or drink?


You will receive narcotic pain pill prescription to fill prior to surgery. You may receive IV pain medication if you need.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


If you pain is control, your activity can be as tolerated after surgery.

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


My procedure is usually as an outpatient and you will be staying for a few hours after. I only let my patient go home if they are ready.

When can I have my drains or tubes removed?


You need to have instructions reviewed with a responsible adult.

How long will I need to use any special equipment, such as a boot or crutches?


Depending on your specific surgical intervention, you may have a cast on your ankle after surgery if there is a tendon harvest from your heal.  You may also need crutches to maneuver around after surgery. Additionally for the repair in the hand, you may have a cast for 4-6 weeks followed by splints as you recover.

Will I need to take sitz baths to care for my incision?


You can use a sitz bath to help clean your incision area daily.

When will my cast be removed?


Usually the cast is removed after 4-6 weeks.

How are we preventing the formation of blood clots?


You may eat and drink after surgery as soon as you feel well and not nauseated. Start with a soft, bland diet.

Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed?


Yes, you will have sutures/staples/pins that will need to be removed after surgery.  The appropriate time for these to be removed depends on your specific condition.

Are there any special precautions I should take to care for my vagina after this surgery?


Patients need to have 2-3 days of complete bed rest, apply ice to reduce swelling, properly clean/dry vagina, apply topical medication and all other medications prescribed. Additionally, patients should avoid vigorous exercise for 3-4 weeks.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


For the majority of gynecomastia patients, no drains or tubes are necessary.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


You will need to return for a follow up appointment 10-14 days after surgery.  You will also be set up for a physiotherapy appointment prior to your discharge.

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


Discuss with your surgeon.

When can I take a shower?


You can take a shower the evening after your surgery, taking care to not get your cast(s) wet.

Will I have any drains, tubes and/or catheters put in during surgery and for how long?


My usual protocol does not use drains, tubes or catheters because I use special closure technique to decrease the needs of these devices.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


After surgery, you should be able to resume all your medications.  If there are any specific medications you need to avoid, you will be notified by your team.

How did my procedure go?


The antibiotics are stopped within 48 hours of surgery.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


Your prescription medications will be given to you upon discharge from the hospital or after your surgery.

When will I start physical therapy and how often do I need to go?


Typically you will need to start physiotherapy exercises when the cast comes off your arm.  Sometimes, depending on the complexity of injury, you may need to start physiotherapy earlier.  This will be organized for you after your surgery.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


I usually prescribe Tylenol 3 and Percocet for a few days to a few weeks after surgery depending on your pain tolerance.

On the day of the surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
    Your driver’s license or identity such as OHIP number will need to be verified at your appointment and at the surgery center.
  • Make sure you have confirmed the surgery you are having
    Review the surgery specifics at your preoperative appointment and again the day of surgery.
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
    You will be marked while you are awake in the preoperative area. Communicate with your surgeon.
  • Make sure the correct side of your surgery has been marked
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

How are we going to manage my pain?


For minor surgical procedures we usually recommend that the patient take acetaminophen (Tylenol) and/or ibuprofen (Advil/Motrin).  Sometimes for more extensive procedures, you may be given a prescription for stronger pain medications.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


You will experience some degree of pain but mostly just discomfort.

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to be stable and can demonstrate that your pain is under control before you are discharged.  Usually, pain medications is prescribed to you if needed. Additionally, you may experience some nausea after surgery from the anesthetics, thus you have to be able to drink and keep down water prior to being discharge.

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


You will receive IV antibiotic immediately prior to surgery start and additional doses if needed in the recovery room. The antibiotic dosing follows the national surgical site infection protocol.

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


Usually this is performed as an outpatient procedure, even when your procedure is scheduled to be done in the operating room.  However, if your surgery is complex, you may need to stay overnight at the hospital for 1-2 days.

How long will any swelling, tenderness, or discomfort in my vagina last?


These symptoms should subside within 3-7 days, depending on the patient.

Do I need to do breathing exercises?


You will need to do breathing exercises only after you have surgery in the operating room. Your nurse will remind you how to do the breathing exercises after your surgery.  If your procedure occurs in the outpatient clinic and you do not have general anesthesia, no breathing exercises is needed after surgery.

Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots?


If you are healthy and has no risk factors, medication to prevent blood clots are usually not necessary.

When can I eat or drink?


If you require general anesthesia, you will need to stop drinking/eating at midnight, the night before surgery.  If your surgery is performed in day surgery or surgical clinic, there is no restrictions to eating or drinking

How will my vagina feel after this surgery in the short and long-term?


In the short term, patients will feel extreme tightness and some sort of discomfort. In the long run, this discomforts and extreme tightness will subside.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


Usually in the recovery room, once you are awake.

How are we preventing the formation of blood clots?


Prevention of blood clot formation is only needed if you are admitted into the hospital after your surgery or if you will be immobilized after surgery (i.e. if you have a tendon repair on the foot/leg).  Otherwise, we will no need to implement any preventative measures for blood clots for outpatient procedures.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


With the exception of blood thinners, most prescription drugs do not need to be stopped and can be continued throughout the day of the procedure.  Blood thinners can be restarted after surgery.

How will this surgery affect my bowel movements or ability to urinate?


The surgery should not affect any bowl movements or the ability to urinate.

How long will it be until I wake up?


Usually in the recovery room, within an hour of your surgery ending.

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


Usually, you will not be placed on any antibiotics after surgery.  However, if the ruptured/injured tendon is a result of an open laceration, you will be placed on a dose of antibiotics and it is commonly prescribed for 7-10 days.

How long will it take for my vagina to recover so that I can see its final shape?


The full recovery/healing usually is achieved 13 weeks after the surgery.

How did my procedure go?


Unless your surgeon specifically says otherwise, your surgery went according to plan without complications.  Success of the surgery depends on post-operative management such continual stretching and exercises when the cast is removed.

How long will my surgery take?


Approximately 1 to 2 hours.

On the day of the procedure


 

  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
  • Make sure you have confirmed the surgery you are having
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

 

 

Will I experience any change in sensations in my vaginal area after surgery?


Usually you won’t experience any changes but you will feel numbness and extreme tightness after the surgery.

Preparation for surgery


  • Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay]
  • Arrange for help driving, heavy lifting, and caring for pets for the first few days.
  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital
  • Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Do not eat 6 hours before surgery.
  • Do not drink alcohol 24 hours prior to surgery. Do not smoke at least 6 weeks prior to surgery
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
    This can be found on the website or by calling my office

Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors
This can be found on my website

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


For procedures done under local anesthetics, no antibiotics is needed for surgery.  If you require general anesthesia, we generally give one dose of antibiotics prior to surgery.  You will not need antibiotics after surgery. If you injury is fresh and complex and the damage to your tendon is due to an open laceration, you may receive a course of antibiotics.

  • For procedures done under local anesthetics, no antibiotics is needed for surgery.
  • If you require general anesthesia, we generally give one dose of antibiotics prior to surgery.  You will not need antibiotics after surgery.
  • If your injury is fresh and complex and the damage to your tendon is due to an open laceration, you may receive a course of antibiotics.

Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots?


Typically for surgery performed in surgical clinic, no medication is needed to prevent blood clot formation.  This is usually the same case for patients who have their procedure in the operating room and are discharged the same day of surgery.  However, you if you stay in the hospital after surgery and/or if you are unable to mobilize after surgery, we may give you some blood thinners to prevent the formation of blood clots after surgery.

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


Yes. You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.

Will this surgery affect my ability to get pregnant or deliver vaginally?


It may affect your ability to get pregnant and women are advised to consider not to have children after this surgery is performed.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


If the surgery is done in surgical clinic, your friend/family member can accompany you in the room during the surgery if they feel comfortable.  If you require general anesthesia, you friend/family member will usually be able to come see you in the recovery room after you’ve completely waken up from anesthetics.

How long will it be until I wake up?


If your surgery is done in surgical clinic, you are typically awake for the whole procedure.  However, if your surgery is complex and require general anesthesia, you will be asleep for the whole procedure and for an additional hour in recovery.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can get the information on our website or call my office for direction.

Will this surgery affect my sexual activity, and, if so, for how long?


It is advised that patients resume sexual activity after 6 weeks.

 

How long will my surgery take?


The duration of the surgery is determined by the location, extent of injury and the complexity of the surgery.  Surgery can range from 30min to several hours depending the surgical intervention implemented.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


Arrive one and an half hour before your scheduled surgery.

Preparing for your surgery


  • Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay
  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital
  • Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
  • Arrange for someone to help you with your daily routine for as long as you may need after surgery
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Stop eating and/or drinking as advised by your doctor
  • Do not smoke or drink alcohol 24 hours before your surgery
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
  • Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors
  • Make changes to your living space that will make it easier for you to access the things you may need while recovering
  • Arrange for any special equipment you may need after surgery

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of your surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.

How long will this surgery take?


The surgery should usually take around 1-2 hours.

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


You will likely need someone to drive you home after surgery as driving with a cast maybe cumbersome at first and require some time before you get used to having the cast on your hand.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


History and physical, EKG, CBC, and metabolic panel for patients over 55 years of age. Thyroid panel for patients with thyroid disorders.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


Please call the office at (416)222-6986 to see your scheduled date and time for your surgery.  This surgery is usually performed at two different hospital sites: Mackenzie Health Center or Rouge Valley Centenary Hospital.  Once your appointment is set, you will be directed to the correct site.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


If you are having surgery in the surgical clinic, you should arrive at your appointment time for surgery.  
If you are scheduled to have surgery in the operating room, there should be an appointed time for you to arrive in your information package given to you during your consultation with the anesthesiologist.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


In general, all medication that may cause bleeding or prolong bleeding time may need to be stopped or alter. One should not stop any medication without consulting with your family physician and the specialist that put you on these drugs.

Should I shower with antibacterial soap the night before and/or morning of surgery?


You can shower with antibacterial soap the evening prior to or the morning of your surgery.  This is only needed if your surgery is scheduled to happen in the operating room.

Will I have any visible scars?


No, the scars are not visible since it is hidden inside the vagina.

Can you review my medication list with me?


Yes, your medication list will be reviewed during your consultation and your pre operative appointments. Please notify your surgeon of any changes or new medications at your preoperative appointment.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


If you are scheduled for surgery in the ambulatory clinic, there are no diet and fluid restrictions prior to or after surgery. However, if your surgery is scheduled to be in the operating room and you’ve seen anesthesiologist for general anesthesia, you will need to stop eating/drinking at midnight the evening prior to your surgery.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


Typically, no other tests is required prior to surgery as extensor tendon injury is diagnosed by symptoms experienced by the patient.  However, certain individuals on specific types of blood thinners may need a blood test immediately prior to surgery.

Where and how big will my incision be?


The incision will be located along the vaginal canal and it will start from the very back of the vagina to the opening (front).

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


Generally, blood thinners should be stopped prior to surgery.  However, different types of blood thinners should be stopped for different durations prior to surgery.  Your family physician should be consulted as to when and if you should stop your medication prior to surgery.

How much will the surgery cost?


The surgery cost will range from $2,200 – $3,200

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


You will meet with the anesthesiologist prior to the surgery in the preoperative area. You may arrange to speak to an anesthesiologist by telephone prior to your surgery date.

Can you review my medication list with me?


Your medication list will be reviewed prior to surgery.  However, you should also review your medication with your family doctor as well.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


I usually like the procedure to be done under general anesthesia.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


If your procedure is complex and requires general anesthesia, you will need to see an anesthesiologist for evaluation prior to [email protected]@@If your procedure is complex and requires general anesthesia, you will need to see an anesthesiologist for evaluation prior to surgery.  This will be set up after your initial consultation and surgical date is set.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


If your procedure is an outpatient procedure performed in the ambulatory clinic, you will be receiving local anesthetics to numb/block sensation in the hand for a short duration.  However, if your repair is extensive and it is done in the operative room, you may need general anesthesia where you a put to sleep.

How long will the results of the surgery last?


It will last for a long time, as long as the patient does not go through vaginal birth again and it is natural for the vagina to become looser as she ages.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


Most patients will take a week off work, but some people elect to return to work prior to that.  If your cast does not interfere with your work, you can return to work 1-2 days after your surgery.  However, if your workplace requires significant manual dexterity, you might need to modify the work you do during the recovery process.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


Most patients return to work around 2-3 weeks after the surgery but if your work requires a lot of sitting, a cushion/pillow is suggested to help reduce any discomfort

How long will it be until I can drive again?


Depending on the injury and repair, some patients are able to drive.  However, with the cast on, some individuals find it cumbersome and difficult to drive safely.  Additionally, it is recommended that you do not drive while taking any prescription pain medication.

Is it possible to have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time?


Vaginoplasty can be accompanied with labial reconstruction.

What kind of sports or exercise limitations will I have?


You will be placed in a cast, your arm is protected for further injury, but it is recommended that you stay away from contact sports and water activities.  After your cast is removed and you begin to regain strength, your level of activity will be modified.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and feel able to drive.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


It will likely take 6-8 weeks with physiotherapy to regain the range of motion and can take up to 4-6 months before the repaired tendon is back to full strength. But it can take up to six months to regain the full range of movement. In some cases, it may never be possible to move the affected finger or thumb as much as before it was damaged.

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


These can be found on my website or during consultation.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


After 2-3 weeks, patients are able to return back to their normal routine

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


Usually, this is an outpatient procedure and you will not need to stay in the hospital.  Howecer, if the surgery is extensive, you may need to stay overnight.

Will I need any special equipment (ie boot, crutches, etc) to help me after surgery?


You likely will not need any crutches/boots ater surgery, unless the repair is in your leg.

How long will I be in the clinic/hospital after my surgery?


Majority of my patients are outpatients. You will be able to leave the hospital when you are ready

What are my options for the possible results of this surgery?


There will be no visible scarring and the patient will immediately experience tightening of the vagina.

Will I need physical therapy and for how long?


You will need physical therapy after surgery, as this is the most essential part to the recovery process.  Physical therapy session will start after the cast is removed and you may need several sessions for the following weeks to month of surgery.

Will I need any special clothing to wear for my thighs?


You will be given a special garment that needs to be wrapped around your thighs. Other than that, it is suggested that patients wear loose and comfortable clothing

Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long?


Usually, there is no tubes or drains placed after surgery if the repair is in the hand.  Larger and more extensive repairs in the arm may require a drain placement. The drain is usually left in place for 2-3 days.

What surgical approach will you use?


The muscle at the back of the vagina is first located and afterwards, it will be reduced through an incision that will surgically remove the excess portion of the stretched vagina muscle. The vagina muscle is then sutured together.

Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long?


I do not usually use drain after the procedure. However, if there may be a lot of drainage after the procedure, a small drain may be placed.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


We usually recommend you to take Acetaminophen (Tylenol) and/or Ibuprofen (Advil/Motrin) after surgery.  You may need some prescription pain medication which will be prescribed for you after surgery.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


You will be given mild narcotic during the first few days after surgery follow by extra strength Tylenol after a few days.

What can I expect if I choose to delay this procedure?


The vaginal walls are pretty stable over time, they do experience stretching and contracting regularly but there will be no extreme differences in the tightness.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


Pain after surgery can vary depending on the complexity of the injury and surgical repair.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


It will be moderate but you will be given pain medication to help manage with this

Will I need a cast after my surgery and for how long?


You will likely need to be casted after surgery for 4-6 weeks.  Depending on the complexity of injury, it may be appropriate after a couple weeks for you to be placed into a splint for serial splinting (to progressively change the degree support you require) or placed into a dynamic splint.

What will my thighs feel like after surgery in the short and long-term?


In the short run, you will feel temporary pain, swelling, soreness, numbness, bruising and tiredness. All of these side effects will subside after a month of recovery

What can I expect if I choose not to have this procedure?


If you do not have this procedure, your vagina walls will remain the same and as you get older, the muscle at the back of the vagina will begin to naturally stretch/become loose. Patients may try other alternative solutions before proceeding with this surgery.

Do you think I will need a blood transfusion during my surgery?


This surgery typically does not need a blood transfusion as there is minimal blood loss and is performed in outpatient basis.  However, if your injury is chronic and requires a complex surgical intervention in the operating room, your blood type will be tested for in case there is more blood loss than usual, and a transfusion is required.  Obtaining blood type for complex operating room cases is standard procedure for all cases.

How long will it take for my arm to recover so that I can see its final shape?


It will take around a year to have full recovery but only a couple of months to look presentable

How long will this surgery take?


The duration of surgery is dependent on the complexity of the injury and surgical repair.

Are there any other surgical options?


There are no other known/approved surgical options other than vaginoplasty.

How long will any swelling, tenderness or discomfort last?


The swelling usually subsides after 2-3 weeks

What will my scar look like?


Your scar will depend on the extent and complexity of the injury.  If there the tendon rupture/laceration is associated with fractures, the repair maybe more extensive and the scar will be larger.  If possible, incisions are made along natural creases and planes to hide the incision after healing for aesthetic purposes.

Where and how big will my incision be?


The incision will likely be above the region of the rupture tendon and can range in length depending on the amount of tendon retraction there is from initial injury.

Will I have bandages after this surgery?


Yes

What are my non-surgical options?


The non-surgical options can include creams that can be inserted into the vagina to tighten the walls but are not as effective. Additionally, patients can do Kegel exercises.

What are the chances that my symptoms could return after this surgery?


Symptoms may reoccur if you re-injure the hand or cause a second rupture.  As the strength of the tendon is now weaker. The exact reoccurrence rate is unknown. Symptoms may reoccur if you re-injure the hand or cause a second rupture as the tendon is now weaker.  The exact reoccurrence rate is unknown.

Will I have any visible scars?


The loose skin cannot be removed without leaving scars but there will be an attempt to hide these scars

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


Some common risk and possible complications are mild bleeding, scabbing, bruising, infection, and allergic reaction.

How will this surgery impact my movement or flexibility in the short and long-term?


Immediately after surgery, you will be placed in a cast to protect the repair.  This cast may stay on for 4 weeks. Afterwards, depending on the injury, you will either be placed into a dynamic splints or may need serial splinting in order to slowly introduce motion to the injured joint.  In the long term, with physiotherapy and stretching, the range of motion and strength of the joint for most patients improve to about 80% of their previous function

What will this surgery do?


This surgery will retighten the vagina walls by reducing the amount of stretch muscle at the back of the vagina.

If I need a graft, where will it come from?


Depending on the size (diameter) of the tendon injured and location of injury, the harvest tendon will usually come from your forearm or your lower leg area.

Where and how big will my incision be?


The incisions will be made at the inner thigh or the posterior portion of the thigh. It is not possible to do this surgery without making a long incision

Will you use a bone graft, staples, or plates during my surgery?


Bone grafts and plates are needed when there are complex injuries to the hand where there is a loss of bone or unstable fractures in the bones of the hand.  The need for this type of management is dependent on the type of injury sustained to the hand.

How long will this surgery take?


The surgery could take around 1-3 hours depending on the size and work needed to be done on the patient

How much will this surgery cost?


You can discuss cost during the initial consultation after the examination it will be determine whether additional works needs to be done.

What are the chances that I may need additional procedures after this surgery?


Additional surgery is usually not needed as long as the patient does not gain excessive weight over the period of time

How will this surgery benefit me?


If you wish to improve the sexual functioning of your vagina and its appearance by retightening the vaginal walls that were effected by advancing age or childbirth.

Will my surgery be arthroscopic or open?


Your surgical repair in the hand is performed with an open incision in the skin.

How long will the results of this surgery last?


It should last for a long time, as long as patients maintain a healthy diet and regular exercise, however as the patient ages, the body will accumulate fat more easily and their skin will loose its firmness

Is it possible to have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time?


Yes. It is advised that liposuction is combined with a thigh lift to produce the most optimal results

Will this surgery affect my movement and flexibility?


It should not affect movement or flexibility on the long run, however during the recovery period, the level of activity should be low

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


Please refer to my website or feel free to ask me during consultation

What are the possible options for what my thighs may look like after my surgery?


Your thighs will be a little bit slimmer but the change will not be drastic. You will have tighter skin than before, less cellulite and an improvement in the texture/firmness of your skin. The degree of these results will vary from patient to patient.

Can I have this surgery done on both thighs at the same time?


Yes

How extensive will this surgery be?


Depending on the amount of excess skin and cellulite you have. It is an invasive surgery and will require general anesthesia.

What surgical technique will you use?


An incision will be made at different sites of the thigh, where loose skin will be removed and sutured back together in order to tighten the skin. Additionally, small amount of fat and soft tissue will be removed and the muscles of the thigh will be tightened. This will overall reduce the appearance of wrinkles and improve the texture of the skin

How will this surgery benefit me?


If you wish to improve the sexual functioning of your vagina and its appearance by retightening the vaginal walls that were effected by advancing age or childbirth.

Are there any other surgical options?


Liposculpture

What are my non-surgical options?


You may use topical cream or laser treatments that will tighten the skin or tries to reduce the appearance of cellulite. Additionally, a healthy lifestyle and commitment to exercise could benefit the patient or control garments

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


The patient’s skin may have rippling, bagginess or experience pigment changes and asymmetry. Another possible but unlikely risk/complications is fluid retention/loss, shock, infections, bleeding, reaction to anesthesia, and permanent numbness.

What will this surgery do?


This surgery will lift and tighten the skin around the thigh (inner/outer portion) and reduce the appearance of wrinkles/cellulite caused by excess fat and skin

Post-operative care/instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Keep your graft clean and dry
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities

Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

Why do I need this surgery?


If you are concerned with the appearance and texture of the skin on your thighs (cellulite, excess fat/skin, etc.).

Call you doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical site
  • You notice that your graft is separating or you have infected discharge from your graft
  • You notice the edges of your skin graft turning dark
  • Your dressing is repeatedly soaked with blood
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

After the procedure


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy

Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

When can I resume sexual activity?


I suggest that you should avoid sexual activity for a few weeks.

When can I drive again?


You can usually drive a couple of days after surgery as long as you are not any narcotic medication and this also depends on the type of skin grafting you had done

When can I go back to work?


For clients that do light office work, return to work within two weeks is possible, depending on the type of skin grafting. For clients who work in more physical demanding jobs, you can take up to 6 weeks after surgery.

What can I expect if I choose to delay this surgery?


Depending on the age of the injury, choosing to delay management can result in the inability to manage the injury conservatively (without surgery/pinning) and further delay may also make the surgery technically more difficult with a higher chance of failure or the need for more complex surgical repair of the injury.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


It is suggested that the activity level is low to avoid any excess rubbing or contact with the healing area. Returning to normal activity can range from 1 week to 3 weeks, depending on the type of skin grafting done

What can I expect if I choose not to have any type of management for my injury?


If you chose not to have any management for an extensor tendon injury, it is likely that you have sustained loss of function as well as anatomical deformity in the finger/hand injured.

How soon would you recommend that I have this surgery?


Surgery is recommended as soon as possible as delaying management may cause more scarring in the area of injury, making it harder for conservative management with splinting as well as making the surgery more difficult technically.

Management for extensor tendon injuries is recommended as soon as possible.  Delaying management may cause more scarring in the area of injury, making it harder for conservative management with splinting as well as making the surgery more difficult technically.

How long will I have to wear my dressings or bandages?


This depends on the amount of contact/rubbing the treated area encounters, usually

Are there any other surgical options?


Depending on the location of the extensor tendon injured different surgical techniques are applied to repair the injured tendon and help restore the function lost due to the tendon injury.  

Other surgical repairs may include a tendon transfer to help facilitate function or tendon graft if the ends of the injured tendon cannot be approximated.  Tendon grafts are harvested from another tendon in the arm or from the ankle (palmaris longus and plantaris tendon respectively).

Post-operative care


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on bathing or swimming
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on caring for your procedure site
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities

What are my non-surgical options?


Non-surgical options include splinting or casting of the injured hand/finger depending on the type and complexity of injury.  If the tendon rupture includes a fracture of a carpal bone and there is instability of the fracture or dislocation, your surgeon may elect to have your hand placed into a cast after realignment with further splinting if appropriate. However, depending on the age of the injury, the most appropriate management may vary.

Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed?


The sutures are usually removed about 10 days after surgery.

After your procedure


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Do not get up without help if you feel weak or dizzy
  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your procedure site
  • You have persistent stiffness, numbness/tingling, or weakness of your affected area
  • The edges of your procedure site are pale or darker than normal
  • Your dressing is repeatedly soaked with blood
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


Common surgical risk include non-union of severed tendon, injury to nearby nerves and vessels, and wound infections.  The most common complication to this surgical intervention is extension lag and loss of flexion. This is often due to the scarring that occurs from the surgical repair. Additionally, there could be a loss of ability to flex the finger or a diminished angle of flexion as a result of scaring from the surgery.

For a more comprehensive list of possible complications, you can find the information on Dr. Colin Hong’s website at: http://www.drcolinhong.com/learn/risks-and-complications/extensor-tendon-repair.

How long do I need to wear a bandage?


You may remove it after 24 hours

How often do I need to go for physical therapy, if needed?


You usually do not need physical therapy. And if you do, this will be discussed with the individual who provides you the physical therapy

What will this surgery do?


Surgical repair attempts to bring the two ends of the ruptured/cut tendon back together in hopes that it can restore the function and dexterity in the finger. This surgery attempts to bring the two ends of the ruptured/cut tendon back together in hopes that it can restore the function and dexterity in the finger.

Do I have sutures that need to be removed?


Yes, if you choose to undergo a technique that requires the use of sutures

Why do I need this surgery?


Depending on the location of the injury, the mechanism of your injury and age of injury, you may need a surgical correction or pinning  of the finger to help restore function to the injured hand/finger.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


I usually like to see my patients the first one to two days after surgery.

Do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


I usually like to see my patients 5 days after the procedure to remove any sutures

What are the different methods of treating extensor tendon injuries?


  • There are multiple ways to treat an extensor tendon injury depending on the age of the injury, mechanism of injury and the location of the injury
  • Splinting – the injured finger is placed into a splint to straighten the finger and allow the ruptured tendon to scar down and restore the function of the finger
  • Surgical repair – when the end opposing ends of the cut/ruptured tendon is brought back together and sutured.  After surgical repair, you often need to be placed into a cast to protect the surgical repair.
  • Pin – you may need a steal pin placed across a joint space in additional to splint/casting to stabilize a joint in order to help the tendon heal.

When can I take a shower?


You can take a shower  two days after the surgery

Are there any special instructions for taking care of my procedure site?


Just keep the area dry and clean

What happens when my extensor tendon is injured?


Extensor tendon injuries often cause functional impairments as well as anatomical deformities. Functional impairments result in an inability to straighten/raise your wrist or straighten your fingers in your hand. The most common anatomical deformities in extensor tendon injuries is mallet fingers or boutonniere deformity.

How do I take care of my surgical site?


There will be a bandage applied over the wound.  During post-surgery, the patient will be require to change the bandage regularly and apply mineral oil to avoid cracking of the skin

What is an extensor tendon?


Extensor tendons are tendons that sit just under the skin, going down the back side of the arm into the hands and fingers.  They function to straighten the wrist, fingers and thumb.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


No

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Any mediation that can cause bleeding or alternate your medical condition need to be stopped or changed before surgery. I will be discussing with you in detail at pre-operative visit.

Do I have any prescriptions that need to be filled?


Yes, just for antibiotics

How are we going to manage my pain?


Pain is usually not a concern but if you do experience any, you can take Tylenol

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


You should have the medication filled before the day of surgery.

When will I be ready to leave the clinic/hospital?


You may leave the hospital whenever you are ready and have been informed of how your procedure went

What can my activity level be today?


Our patient can do light activities at home. It is better to walk slowly and avoid any excess contact/rubbing on the surgical area. If the skin grafting is done on the leg, patients are advised to remain in bed for 10 days and keep the treated leg elevated

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

Were any medications started or changed today?


Antibiotics will be started after you finish surgery but your regular medication should still be taken unless advised by your doctor or me

On the day of your procedure


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
  • Make sure the correct site of your procedure has been marked
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

How does my incision look?


Your incision on the donor site should  finish healing after a couple of weeks while the incision for the skin grafting will be distinct and noticeable

How long will my procedure take?


The procedure should not take more than 30 minutes

What’s the plan for today (labs, tests, procedures)?


For my patients, general lab tests such as CBC, electrolytes, liver function, INR, PTT, cardiogram are fairly routine, Other tests may be ordered if one has special medical condition.

Preparing for your procedure


  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work if needed
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital if needed
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information and directions to the clinic/hospital

When will I start physical therapy?


If needed, you can start physical therapy after a month but this can vary depending on how deep the damage was and where the impairment occurred

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


Yes, this can also be found on my website or in my office

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will be given intra-operative medication; local block and oral and parental pain medication to make sure you are comfortable.

What time should I arrive for my procedure?


You should arrive half an hour before your scheduled procedure

What causes extensor tendon injuries?


Injuries to extensor tendons (tendons on the back side of hand and arm) often results from cuts or when there is significant jamming force hitting the fingers causing the tendons to rip or rupture from their bony attachment.  This leads to functional impairments as well as anatomic deformities.

Do I need any tests done before this procedure?


History and physical

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to meet all the discharge criteria before you can go home.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


No

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


My procedure is usually as an outpatient and you will be staying for a few hours after. I only let my patient go home if they are ready.

Can you review my medication list with me?


Yes, your medication list will be reviewed during your consultation and your preoperative appointments. Please notify your surgeon of any changes or new medications at your preoperative appointment.

Do I need to do breathing exercises?


Breathing exercises after the procedure is improvement and my patients start in the recovery room after they are awake.

What kinds of anesthesia or sedation can I have for this procedure?


A local anesthetic is used

When can I eat or drink?


You can drink water and liquid shortly after the procedure.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


You should be able to return back to your normal routine right away

When can I have my drains or tubes removed?


My usual protocol does not use drains, tubes or catheters because I use special closure technique to decrease the needs of these devices.

What are my options for pain medications after the procedure?


Patients may take Tylenol extra strength

What can I expect my pain to be like?


None to minimal

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


I usually like you to continue with your usual medication with exception of medication that can cause bleeding. I will discuss this with you further.

Will I need any bandages after my procedure?


Usually not

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


This depends on your medical conditions and I will discuss this with you at your pre-operative consultation.

How much will this procedure cost?


This should be discussed during consultation since it is dependent on the location, size, and the amount of skin tags needed to be removed

How long will this procedure take?


It should not take more than 30 minutes, depending on how many skin tags you wish to remove

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

Will I have any visible scarring?


Sometimes, depending on the location but they are usually small and faint

During the procedure


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
  • Make sure you have confirmed the surgery you are having
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

What are the chances that my skin tag could come back?


This will depend on the patient. Factors that may increase the chances of reoccurring skin tags are the weight, age and genetics of the patient

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


I usually start antibiotics in the operating room, and you may take oral antibiotics for another 48 hours.

How will you remove my skin tag (ie. tying, freezing, burning, etc.)?


I prefer surgically cutting off the skin tag.

Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots?


If you have significant risks of DVT or pulmonary embolus, you will need to take blood-thinning medication.

What can I expect if I choose to delay this procedure?


Nothing, the skin tag will remain

What will this procedure do?


This surgery will lift and tighten the skin around the body and reduce the appearance of wrinkles/cellulite caused by excess fat and skin

What can I expect if I choose not to have this procedure?


You can resort to either freezing or tying off or leaving the skin tag the way it is

When will my visitors be able to see me?


You usually wake up within 10 minutes from the procedure, and your family can see you within an hour from the procedure.

How soon would you recommend that I have this procedure?


Skin tags are natural and common, it poses no adverse health effects to the individual so it is up to the patient how soon they wish to proceed with this procedure

How long will it be until I wake up?


You usually wake up within 10 minutes from the procedure, and your family can see you within an hour from the procedure.

Do I have any other options?


You may choose to undergo other forms of treatments like freezing, burning or tying off

How long will my surgery take?


The surgery time can range from 1-2 hours

What are the risks and possible complications of this procedure?


The risk/complications for this procedure is minimal since it is simple and quick. Regardless of any procedure, there will always be a risk for infection.

Preparing for surgery


  • Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay
  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital
  • Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Stop eating and/or drinking as advised by your doctor
  • Do not smoke or drink alcohol 24 hours before your surgery
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
  • Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors

 

What will this procedure do?


This procedure will remove the skin tags present on your skin

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


You need someone to take you home after surgery as driving is not permitted.

Post-operative care/instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications

Yes, narcotic pain medications impair your ability to drive.

  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
    You may bath but do not submerge your surgical site.
  • Keep your incision clean and dry
  • Elevate your head to reduce swelling in your face
  • Use cold compresses on your face to reduce swelling
  • Do not smoke as it could delay healing
    Smoking is dangerous for facelift. You should discuss with your surgeon if you not able to quit smoking at least 4 weeks before and 4 weeks after surgery. Skin necrosis, difficulty healing, unsatisfactory result, and unsightly scarring can result from smoking.
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Avoid wearing clothing that is worn by going over your head
    Yes, wear easy to dress, zip up the front clothing.
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities

Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can call my office for direction. Our address is available online and one can also use mobile app for direction

Call the doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • Your bandages are repeatedly soaked through with blood
  • You have persistent stiffness, numbness/tingling, or weakness of your face
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


We recommend that you arrive 30 minutes before your surgery. We will also try you on your mobile phone if the time of surgery has been changed.

After the procedure


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


My anesthesiologist and I prefer that one stop eating and drinking 6 hours before surgery. One can take medication with a small sip of water if the medication is indicated before surgery

When can I drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and you feel capable of driving.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


For my patients, general lab tests such as CBC, electrolytes, liver function, INR, PTT, cardiogram are fairly routine, Other tests may be ordered if one has special medical condition.

When can I go back to work?


For most clients, you may return to work after one week. If you need to do heavy lifting or if you are in front of the camera the time requirement may be longer.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


In general, all medication that may cause bleeding or prolong bleeding time may need to be stopped or alter. One should not stop any medication without consulting with your family physician and the specialist that put you on these drugs.

When can I resume sexual activity?


You may resume sexual activity at two to three weeks.

Can you review my medication list with me?


I review all patient medications on initial consultation, pre-operative appointment and day of surgery.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


You should avoid bending over or heavy lifting for two weeks.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


All my patients see the anesthesiologist before but usually on the day of surgery. For one who has special needs, I frequently arrange for consultation with anesthesiologist a few days before surgery.

When will my sutures be removed?


The sutures in front of the ear are typically removed at one week and the sutures behind the ear are removed at two weeks.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


My procedure is usually done under general anesthesia but spine and region with sedation are also possible.

When will my bandages be removed?


Your bandages will be removed at your first follow-up appointment.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


This depends on the type of work. For people who are doing desk job and love to go back to work, return to modified work after 1 week is very common. For one who has a more physical intense job, one may take 6 to 8 weeks before one returns to modified work.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


You will follow up a day or two after surgery. Following this weekly appointment until you are fully recovered.

How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my face?


Keep your face elevated and ice.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


In general, you should not drive the first 48 hours after surgery. Also if you are taking heavy necrotic, one should not be driving. Most of my clients are usually driving after 3 to 4 days.

How do I take care of my incision and face?


Just keep your wound clean and dry.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


You should be able to get back to 80% of your daily activities within one week. I encourage my patients to ambulate and resume light activities within a few days after surgery. You are encouraged to lean over when you are walking. We recommend that you do not do any heavy exercise or weight lift for four to six weeks.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Yes, you will receive a list of medications to avoid prior to surgery and initially after surgery. Do not take NSAIDS, ibuprofen, or aspirin until your doctor approves.

Why do I need this procedure?


If you are concerned with the small bump of soft skin growth on your skin and wish to remove it

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


I usually perform this surgery as an outpatient and every one is able to go home the same day. You will be seen the following day or 2 days later.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


Tell the doctor or nurse which pharmacy you prefer. Non-narcotic medications such as Compazine may be sent electronically but narcotic pain medications must be printed and hand delivered to the pharmacy.

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will receive narcotic pain pill prescription to fill prior to surgery. You may receive IV pain medication if you need.

Will I need physical therapy and for how long?


Patients usually do not need physical therapy unless the damage was severe to the point of movement impairment

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to meet all the discharge criteria before you can go home.

Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long?


Because of the technique that I use to close the abdomen, drains and tubes are usually not necessary unless it is of extraordinary situation.

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


My procedure is usually as an outpatient and you will be staying for a few hours after. I only let my patient go home if they are ready.

When can I eat or drink?


You may eat and drink after surgery. Start with a soft, bland diet.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


You will receive injected pain medication into your abdominal wall during surgery and the evening of your surgery, you will be very comfortable. I usually prescribe Tylenol 3 and Percocet for a few days to a few weeks after surgery depending on your pain tolerance.

When can I have my drains or tubes removed?


This surgery does not require any drains or tubes.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


The pain will be moderate but medication will be provided to help manage

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


Discuss with your surgeon.

What will my grafted area look like in the long-term?


The grafted area will be red and noticeable with scarring in the beginning, however as time goes by, all these side effects will subside but will still be apparent

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


The antibiotics are stopped within 48 hours of surgery.

Will I have any special dressings or bandages after this surgery and for how long?


You will have bandages that will need to be regularly removed and replaced for a couple of weeks, depending on where the location of the treated area is

Post-operative care/instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on bathing and swimming
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on caring for your procedure site
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities

Call the doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • The edges of your biopsy site have an abnormal color
  • Your dressing is repeatedly soaked with blood
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

How long will this surgery take?


The surgery should take

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

After the procedure


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Do not get up without help if you feel weak or dizzy

What will my scar look like?


Some patients will have minimal scarring while others will have a very distinct and visible scarring

When can I resume my normal routine?


Right away

On the day of your surgery


 

  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth. Your driver’s license or identity will need to be verified at your appointment and at the surgery center.
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
    Review the surgery specifics at your preoperative appointment and again the day of surgery.
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
    You will be marked while you are awake in the preoperative area. Communicate with your surgeon.

  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

 

 

Where and how big will my surgical site be?


This will vary from patient to patient

What can my activity level be when I get home?


You can return to your normal routine right away

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


You will receive IV antibiotic immediately prior to surgery start and additional doses if the surgery last 6 hours. The antibiotic dosing follows the national surgical site infection protocol.

How long will I have to wear my bandage?


You may take off the bandage a day after the surgery

If my own skin is used, will I have a loss of sensation in the donor area?


There is a chance that there may be a loss of sensation in the donor area, depending on the degree of damage

When will my visitors be able to see me?


Usually in the recovery room, within an hour of your surgery ending

Do I have sutures that need to be removed?


Yes, they will be removed 3-5 days after the procedure

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


I usually like to see my patients 1-2 days after the procedure

How long will it be until I wake up?


My patients usually wakes up 10 minutes after the surgery is finished.

Are there any special instructions for taking care of my procedure site?


Just keep the area clean and dry

Will I need additional surgeries after this one?


Successful patients usually do not need additional surgery

How long will my surgery take?


Approximately 4 to 6 hours.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


No

What are the chances that my body could reject the graft?


The chances are slim since the graft is obtained from your skin/body and not from another source

Preparing for Surgery


  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital after your surgery.
  • Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
    You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.
  • Do not smoke at least 6 weeks prior to surgery.
  • Do not drink alcohol 24 hours before your surgery
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
  • Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors

Do I have any prescriptions that need to be filled?


No

How are we going to manage my pain?


Pain is none to minimal so usually you do not need medication

How long should my graft last?


Your graft should last a lifetime, as long as the healing process is successful

When will I be ready to leave the clinic/hospital?


This is an outpatient surgery and you may leave whenever you are ready to do so

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


Yes. You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.

Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay
Yes, arrange for help driving, heavy lifting, and caring for pets for the first few days.

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can get the information on our website or call my office for direction.

How thick will my graft be?


The thickness of the graft will depend on the severity of the damage

On the day of the surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
  • Make sure the correct site of your procedure has been marked
  • Yes, you will be marked while you are awake in the preoperative area. Communicate with your surgeon.
  • Make sure the correct side of your procedure has been marked
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


Arrive one and an half hour before your scheduled surgery.

How long will my procedure take?


The procedure should take less than 20 minutes

What type of graft will you use?


The graft will be obtained from another part of your body (commonly thighs and buttocks)

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of your surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.

Preparing for surgery


  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work if needed
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your procedure (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Stop eating and/or drinking as advised by your doctor
  • Do not smoke or drink alcohol 24 hours before your procedure
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information and directions to the clinic/hospital

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


History and physical, EKG, CBC, and metabolic panel for patients over 55 years of age. Thyroid panel for patients with thyroid disorders.

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


No, you usually do not need someone to drive you home as long are you are not taking any narcotics to manage the pain

What can I expect if I choose to delay this surgery?


Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can get the information on our website or call my office for direction.

Can you review my medication list with me?


You medication list will be reviewed prior to surgery and you  will be alerted of any medications that need to be stopped.

What time should I arrive for my procedure?


Arrive half an hour before your surgery

What can I expect if I choose not to have this surgery?


Do I need to do any tests before surgery?


History and physical

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


You will meet with the anesthesiologist prior to the surgery in the preoperative area. You may arrange to speak to an anesthesiologist by telephone prior to your surgery date.

How soon would you recommend that I have this surgery?


Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


No, this is usually not necessary

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


I usually use local anesthesia with IV sedation.

Can you review my medication list with me?


Yes, your medication list will be reviewed during your consultation and your preoperative appointments. Please notify your surgeon of any changes or new medications at your preoperative appointment.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


You may return to work as early as one week.

What kinds of anesthesia or sedation can I have for this procedure?


A local anesthetic is used and sedation is not needed

Are there any other surgical options?


Other surgical options can include bioengineered skin, negative-pressure wound therapy, and skin cell gun.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and feel able to drive.

What are my options for pain medications after the procedure?


Pain is usually very minimal after surgery. My patients usually do not need to take any narcotic.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


There should be no to minimal pain since a local anesthetic is injected at the site before the removal is made

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


You should plan on recovering at home for one week. You cannot plan for heavy exercise for two to three weeks.

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


Some possible complications/risk are infections, reaction to anesthesia, bleeding, skin graft resisting to heal,  increase or reduce/lost of skin sensation, scarring, discolouration of the skin, and uneven skin surface

How long will this procedure take?


It should take less than 10 minutes

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


My patients usually go home once they have recovered from the anesthesia.

What will this surgery do?


This surgery will remove healthy skin from a donor site (usually from the buttocks or thighs) and place/stitch it over the area of the skin where the wound resides

Will I have any visible scars?


There will be scars hidden under the chin, temporal region, under the side burn, inside the ear, and behind the ear.

Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long?


Because of the technique that I use, drains and tubes are usually not necessary unless it is of extraordinary situation.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


You will discuss postoperative pain control with the surgeon at your postoperative appointment with your surgeon and receive a prescription.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


Pain is usually very minimal after surgery. My patients usually do not need to take any narcotic after 72 hours.

How will my face feel after this surgery in the short and long-term?


Your face will feel numbness and tight after surgery. The incision may be slightly tender or itchy.

How long will any swelling and bruising in my face last?


The majority of the swelling and bruising resolves within ten days to two weeks.

How long will it take for my face to recover so that I can see its final shape?


You should have a normal working appearance at ten days to two weeks.

Will I have any dressings on my face after this surgery?


You should have a normal working appearance at ten days to two weeks.

Why do I need this surgery?


If you suffer from burn marks/skin loss that had cause deep skin tissue damage and wish to seek treatment to restore the area by filling it in or reduce any discolouration on the skin or improve skin texture

Where and how big will my incision be?


The incision length varies with the degree of skin excess. Generally the incision begins at the temporal region extending the edge of the side burn, hugs the inside of the ear, follows the crease of the earlobe and ends in the posterior ear crease.

How much will this surgery cost?


Please contact my office for the information.

How long will the results of this surgery last?


Because skin is excised and SMAS are shifted and tighten, your results will last many years and longer. It also helps if you maintain your skin with skin care products, no smoking, and sun avoidance. Periodic treatments with no invasive procedures such as Botox, fillers, micro laser or chemical peels and IPL can keep your look youthful look. If you lose significant weight, your results may loosen.

Can I have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time?


Yes. Blepharoplasty, fat transfer to the face, chemical peels and laser are commonly done at the same time.

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


Yes. There are photos on the website and more in the office.

Will I have any visible scaring?


Depending on the size of the incision and how your skin recovers

Can I see different options for the possible results of my surgery?


Yes.

Where and how big will my incision be?


This will vary from patient to patient since the location of abnormal skin will differ

Will I need additional skin biopsies after this one?


If done properly, it is not needed for any additional surgeries

What surgical approach will you use?


The Rhytidectomy is done in the subcutaneous plane and the skin is separated from the deep tissue I then mobilize and use resuspend the SMAS. Fat is then used to restore areas where fat and volume are lost due to aging.

What areas will you be performing the biopsy?


The areas of the skin that are infected

Would you recommend a full facelift or a mini facelift?


This will depend on the age, amount of excess skin, and skin elasticity of the patient. Generally speaking, younger patients are recommended to have a mini facelift versus a full face lift, which is more suited to older patients with looser skin.

What type of biopsy will you be taking (ie. shave, punch, excision)?


This will depend on the depth of the skin area (shallow/deep) and overall size of the melanoma

What can I expect if I choose to delay this procedure?


You are putting yourself at risk by allowing more time for the cancer cells to grow, if the skin area is indeed cancerous

Are there any other surgical options?


Laser liposuction of the neck or subdermal tightening with the laser fiber can improve the jaw and neckline without the incisions, general anesthesia, or recovery of Rhytidectomy. Fat transfer to the face can soften the stigmata of aging and restore volume to depleted cheeks and lips. These surgical options can be done in the office with local anesthesia.

What can I expect if I choose not to have this procedure?


If you rely and trust the observation done by the dermatologist, you can choose not to have this procedure however it is recommended that you do because sometimes even with a well-trained eye, it cannot always be determined noncancerous

What are my non-surgical options?


Skin care, chemical peels and laser can improve a youthful look with no significant downtime. Botox and filler injections can have a high impact on lines but need to be repeated in intervals.

How soon would you recommend that I have this procedure?


As soon as abnormal skin appears and is detected

Do I have any other options?


You may rely on the physical examination of a dermatologist that is well-trained in detecting and classifying whether it is cancerous or not

What are the risks of this surgery?


The risks and complications are similar to other aesthetic surgery. They include local such as skin ischemia and loss and this is more common in smoker, hematoma, and nerve injury asymmetry. The systemic complications include blood clot and PE and other aesthesia risks. In healthy patients in the hands of board-certified Plastic Surgeons, the complication rates are in fact not very high.

What are the risks and possible complications of this procedure?


The risks and complications are similar to other aesthetic surgery but less likely since the procedure is not invasive and simple. In healthy patients in the hands of board certified Plastic Surgeons, the complication rates are in fact not very high.

What will this procedure do?


This procedure will remove a small sample of your skin tissue that will be processed in a lab and examined to determine whether you have skin cancer or not

What is the goal of this surgery?


Rhytidectomy (necklift) will set back the clock. The cheeks will be more balance and reverse back to a more youthful V shape, firmer and more balance. The neck and jawline will appear smoother and younger.

Why do I need this procedure?


If your doctor suspects that you may have skin cancer

How will this surgery benefit me?


To reverse facial aging, sagging and heavy jowls and neck laxity. The surgery will help to change an aging square face to more V shape youthful face and to restore areas of the face that are hallowing from aging.

Post-operative care/instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Keep your nose clean and dry
  • Do not blow your nose as long as advised by your doctor
  • Use cold compresses to help reduce swelling on your face
  • Keep your head elevated on a pillow when laying down to reduce swelling
  • Avoid wearing clothing that is worn by going over your head
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

Call the doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • You have abnormal bleeding from your nose
  • You have difficulty breathing through your nose after the packing and tubes are removed
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

After the procedure


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

When can I drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and you feel capable of driving.

When can I go back to work?


Patients usually return back to work within 1-2 weeks.

When can I resume sexual activity?


You may resume sexual activity at one to two weeks.

When can I resume exercise and contact sports?


Patients may resume exercise within 2-3 weeks after surgery and avoid contact sports for 8 weeks.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


Bed rest is not necessary but you can do light activities, such as reading, going on the computer, watching tv, etc. It is advised you avoid any direct sunlight and applying any pressure onto the nose

When will my bandages and splints be removed?


Your bandages will be removed at your first follow-up appointment and your splints will be removed a week after your surgery.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


You will follow up a day or two after surgery. Following this weekly appointment until you are fully recovered.

How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my face?


Apply ice to the area and keep your face elevated

How do I take care of my nose?


Yes, the postoperative instructions will be reviewed at your preoperative appointment.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Yes, you will receive a list of medications to avoid prior to surgery and initially after surgery. Do not take NSAIDS, ibuprofen, or aspirin until your doctor approves.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


Tell the doctor or nurse which pharmacy you prefer. Non-narcotic medications such as Compazine may be sent electronically but narcotic pain medications must be printed and hand delivered to the pharmacy.

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will receive narcotic pain pill prescription to fill prior to surgery. You may receive IV pain medication if you need.

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to have instructions reviewed with a responsible adult and meet all discharge criteria.

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


You may be released once you have met all the discharge criteria.

When can I eat or drink?


You may eat and drink after surgery as soon as you feel well and not nauseated. Start with a soft, bland diet.

When can I have my drains and tubes removed?


For the majority of rhinoplasty patients, no drains or tubes are necessary.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


Discuss with your surgeon.

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


The antibiotics are stopped within 48 hours of surgery.

How did my procedure go?


Please tell your surgeon if they may discuss your surgery with your ride home or if a significant other needs to be called.

On the day of the surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
    Your driver’s license or identity such as OHIP number will need to be verified at your appointment and at the surgery center.
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
    Yes, review the surgery specifics at your preoperative appointment and again the day of surgery.
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
    Yes, you will be marked while you are awake in the preoperative area. Communicate with your surgeon.
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


You will receive IV antibiotic immediately prior to surgery start and additional doses if needed in the recovery room. The antibiotic dosing follows the national surgical site infection protocol.

Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots?


Usually in the recovery room, once you are awake.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


Usually in the recovery room, within an hour of your surgery ending.

How long will it be until I wake up?


The surgery can take 1-2 hours.

Preparing for surgery


  • Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay
  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work. Arrange for help driving, heavy lifting, and caring for pets for the first few days.
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital
    You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
    You can call my office if you have any other questions.
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Do not drink alcohol 24 hours prior to surgery. Do not smoke at least 6 weeks prior to surgery.
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
    Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors
  • Wear easy to dress clothing such as loose pants with an elastic waistband and a comfortable shirt with a zip up front.

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


Yes. You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can get the information on our website or call my office for direction.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


Arrive one and an half hour before your scheduled surgery.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of your surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


History and physical, EKG, CBC, and metabolic panel for patients over 55 years of age. Thyroid panel for patients with thyroid disorders.

Can you review my medication list with me?


Yes, your medication list will be reviewed during your consultation and your pre-operative appointments. Please notify your surgeon of any changes or new medications at your preoperative appointment. Medications that need be stopped for surgery with reviewed at that time.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


You will meet with the anesthesiologist prior to the surgery in the preoperative area. You may arrange to speak to an anesthesiologist by telephone prior to your surgery date.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


I usually like the procedure to be done under general anesthesia.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


You can usually return to work less than a week. If your job is very physical than it may take a little longer.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and feel able to drive.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


You can usually return to work within a few days to 2 weeks after surgery.

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


The surgery is an outpatient surgery done in my own surgery center.

What will my scar look like?


Your scar will be hidden inside the nose, where it is not visible to others.

Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long?


Due to the technique I use, tubes and drains are not needed during this surgery.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


Majority of patients take just plain Tylenol or Tylenol #3.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


Pain is minimal and patients usually only feel discomfort and congestion

What are the chances that I will need another nose surgery after this one?


It is very slim that you will need another nose surgery unless you are unhappy with the results or something out of the ordinary occurred that causes your nose to break

How long will any swelling in my face last?


The swelling should subside by 2 weeks and be minimal

How long will it take for my nose to recover so that I can see its final shape?


Depending on the patient, it could take 12-18 months for full recovery but around only 2 weeks to look presentable

Will I have bandages or a splint on my nose and for how long?


Yes you will and bandages may be removed a couple of days after surgery while splints are removed around a week after the surgery.

Will this surgery affect my ability to breathe?


In most cases, the surgery should not affect the ability to breathe.

What can I expect after my surgery?


You may experience bruising and swelling in the nose and eye area. Additionally, you may feel congested. The degree will depend on the amount of reconstruction that occurred during the surgery.

Do you think I will need a blood transfusion during my surgery?


It is very rare for you to have a blood transfusion. In most cases, you do not need one.

Where and how big will my incision be?


Most of the time the incision will be located inside the nose and will not be visible. The size of the incision is small.

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


Please refer to my website or during consultation for pictures.

Can I see different options for the possible results of my surgery?


Yes.

Are there any other surgical options?


There are fat grafting, injections/fillers and nonsurgical options that are less effective are make-up, massaging, and products that claim to add height

What are the risks of this surgery?


There are general and local complications from the procedure. Risks include infection, small burst blood vessels resulting in tiny, permanent red spots, and incomplete improvement which may require additional surgery.

What will this surgery do?


The surgery may alter the appearance of your nose, take off your dorsal hump, refine your nasal tip, augment or decrease the height of your nose, improve your contour and your nasal passage.

Why do I need this surgery?


If you are unhappy with the appearance of your nose or if you have breathing problem, rhinoplasty may help to improve this.

Post-operative care/instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Keep your incision clean and dry
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on caring for the bandages on your ear
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on your sleeping position to help you avoid discomfort while sleeping
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

Call your doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • Your bandages are repeatedly soaked with blood
  • Your ears feel numb or cold
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

After your procedure


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

When can I drive again?


You can usually drive 48 hours after surgery as long as you are not any narcotic medication.

When can I go back to work?


Patients may go back to work after the surgery one week but this may be longer if their work is physically demanding

When can I resume sexual activity?


Sexual activity can be resumed after a few weeks when majority of the swelling has subside

What can my activity level be when I get home?


It is advised that vigorous activity should be avoided for a few weeks and our patient can do light activities at home.

When will my staples or sutures be removed?


No. The sutures will remain permanently.

When will my bandages be removed?


The bandages are usually removed at your first follow-up appointment

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


I usually send you home with oral pain medication and some antibiotics.

How can I help reduce any discomfort around my ears?


Taking your pain medication can help relive any discomfort you may have and avoid any contact with the area

Are there any special instructions for caring for my ears?


Keep the head elevated with high pillows and wearing a protective head band can help reduce any chance of unintentional rubbing or pulling of the ear

How do I take care of my incision?


Just keep the area clean and dry.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Any mediation that can cause bleeding or alternate your medical condition need to be stopped or changed before surgery. I will be discussing with you in detail at pre-operative visit.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


You should have the medication filled before the day of surgery.

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will be given intra-operative medication; local block and oral and parental pain medication to make sure you are comfortable.

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to meet all the discharge criteria before you can go home.

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


My procedure is usually as an outpatient and you will be staying for a few hours after. I only let my patient go home if they are ready.

When can I eat or drink?


You can drink water and liquid shortly after the procedure.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


I usually like you to continue with your usual medication with exception of medication that can cause bleeding. I will discuss this with you further.

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


This depends on your medical conditions and I will discuss this with you at your pre operative consultation.

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

On the day of your procedure


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms
    You will have time to review the consent and I like to make sure you understand and have asked all the questions that you may have.

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


I usually start antibiotics in the operating room, and you may take oral antibiotics for another 48 hours.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


You usually wake up within 10 minutes from the procedure, and your family can see you within an hour from the procedure.

How long will it be until I wake up?


Our clients usually wake up within 10 minutes at the end of the procedure.

How long will my surgery take?


It usually takes 1 to 2 hours.

Preparation for surgery


  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
  • It is a good idea to have someone take care of responsibilities at home and at work until you are ready to take care of these.
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital. Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • You are given a number to call and /or text me after surgery.
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • I like to have close contact with our patients. If you have any concern after your surgery, please contact our office.
  • Stop eating and/or drinking as advised by your doctor
  • My anesthesiologist and I prefer that one stop eating and drinking 6 hours before surgery. One can take medication with a small sip of water if the medication is indicated before surgery
  • Do not smoke or drink alcohol 24 hours before your surgery
  • I like having our clients stop smoking one week before surgery and two weeks after. If you cannot stop completely as least try to decrease the amount you smoke. It is a good idea to abstain from alcohol 24 hours before surgery.
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
  • Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


You need someone to take you home after surgery as driving is not permitted.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can call my office for direction. Our address is available online and one can also use mobile app for direction

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


We recommend that you arrive 30 minutes before your surgery. We will also try you on your mobile phone if the time of surgery has been changed.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


My anesthesiologist and I prefer that one stop eating and drinking 6 hours before surgery. One can take medication with a small sip of water if the medication is indicated before surgery

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


For my patients, general lab tests such as CBC, electrolytes, liver function, INR, PTT, cardiogram are fairly routine, Other tests may be ordered if one has special medical condition.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


The decision to stop your medications will be discussed when your medications are reviewed.

Can you review my medication list with me?


Your medication list will be reviewed prior to surgery.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


All my patients see the anesthesiologist before but usually on the day of surgery. For one who has special needs, I frequently arrange for consultation with anesthesiologist a few days before surgery.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


My procedure is usually done under general anesthesia but spine and region with sedation are also possible.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


Patients can return to their normal routine within 1-2 weeks.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


In general, you should not drive the first 48 hours after surgery. Also if you are taking heavy necrotic, one should not be driving. Most of my clients are usually driving after 3 to 4 days.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


You should be able to get back to 80% of your daily activities within one week. I encourage my patients to ambulate and resume light activities within a few days after surgery. We recommend that you do not do any heavy exercise or weight lift for 3 weeks

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


The surgery is an outpatient procedure. Patients are kept in the clinic for a couple of hours until they have awoken from the surgery and are ready to leave.

Will I have any visible scars?


The scars from the incision are usually well hidden behind the ears

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


Patients may take extra strength Tylenol, Tylenol 3, Percocet to help with the pain.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


There is moderate pain but medication will be provided to help manage with this

How long will any swelling and bruising last?


The swelling should go down dramatically the first week and will take a full 3 months for all minor swelling to disappear.

How long will it take for my ears to recover so that I can see their final shape?


Recovery time should take around 3 months, in order for all the swelling to subside

Will I have any dressings on my ears after this surgery?


Yes

What can I expect after my surgery?


There will be some swelling after the surgery but the results are noticeable right away when the bandages are removed

Where and how big will my incision be?


The incisions are made on the back of the ear, where the ear cartilage will be removed or sutured, in order to reshape the ear.

How much will this surgery cost?


If you are older than 16 years, it should range from $3,500 – $4,000

How long will the results of this surgery last?


It should last a lifetime

Will this surgery affect my ability to hear?


No, it should not when performed properly

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


You can see pre and post-operative result in our office, on my website, or during consultation

Can I see different options for the possible results of my surgery?


Yes

Will both of my ears be operated on at the same time?


Yes

Are there any other surgical options?


There are no other surgical techniques.

What are my non-surgical options?


There are home-made remedies using adhesive material to fold back the ears or manipulate the shape and a non-suture technique.

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


Some risk and complications are blood clots, infection, overcorrection, contour distortion, hearing loss (very rare)

What will this surgery do?


It is able to improve the proportion, size, and shape of the ear and overall repair any disfigured ears

Why do I need this surgery?


If you have disproportional ears due to genetics or an accident or any form of injury and wish to make the ears on each side to be symmetrical

Post-operative care/instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
    Narcotic pain medications impair your ability to drive.
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery. You may bath but do not submerge your surgical site.
  • Keep your incision clean and dry
  • Keep your head elevated when laying down to reduce the swelling in your neck
  • Use cold compresses on your neck to reduce swelling. Apply ice to face and neck as much as possible for at least the first two days.
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on caring for any bandages you may have
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on any drains or tubes you may go home with
  • Avoid wearing clothing that is worn by going over your head and tight around the neck
  • Smoking is dangerous for facelift. You should discuss with your surgeon if you not able to quit smoking at least 4 weeks before and 4 weeks after surgery. Skin necrosis, difficulty healing, unsatisfactory result, and unsightly scarring can result from smoking.
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

Call your doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • Your dressing is repeatedly soaked with blood
  • You have persistent stiffness, numbness/tingling, or weakness of your neck
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

After your procedure


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

When can I resume sexual activity?


You may resume sexual activity at two to three weeks.

When can I drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and you feel capable of driving.

When can I go back to work?


For most clients, you may return to work after one week. If you need to do heavy lifting or if you are in front of the camera the time requirement may be longer.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


You should avoid bending over or heavy lifting for two weeks.

When will any bandages be removed?


Your bandages will be removed at your first follow-up appointment.

Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed?


The sutures in front of the ear are typically removed at one week and the sutures behind the ear are removed at two weeks.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


I usually like to see my patients 24-48 hours after the surgery and followed by another one a week later.

When can I take a shower?


You may take a shower a day after the surgery.

How do I take care of my incision?


Just keep your wound clean and dry.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Yes, you will receive a list of medications to avoid prior to surgery and initially after surgery. Do not take NSAIDS, ibuprofen, or aspirin until your doctor approves.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


Tell the doctor or nurse which pharmacy you prefer. Non-narcotic medications such as Compazine may be sent electronically but narcotic pain medications must be printed and hand delivered to the pharmacy.

How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my neck?


Keep your face elevated and ice.

Are there any special instructions for caring for my neck?


Yes, the postoperative instructions will be reviewed at your preoperative appointment. After the initial bandage is removed, apply polysporin or vitamin E to your incisions twice daily.

How do I take care of my incisions?


Just keep your wound clean and dry.

How does my incision look?


The incision should be clean and dry.

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will receive narcotic pain pill prescription to fill prior to surgery. You may receive IV pain medication if you need.

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to meet all the discharge criteria before you can go home.

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


My procedure is usually as an outpatient and you will be staying for a few hours after. I only let my patient go home if they are ready.

When can I eat or drink?


You may eat and drink after surgery. Start with a soft, bland diet.

When can I have my drains or tubes removed?


Drains and tubes are not used in the procedure.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


Discuss with your surgeon.

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


The antibiotics are stopped within 48 hours of surgery.

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

On the day of the surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
    Your driver’s license or identity will need to be verified at your appointment and at the surgery center.
  • Make sure you have confirmed the surgery you are having. Review the surgery specifics at your preoperative appointment and again the day of surgery.
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


You will receive IV antibiotic immediately prior to surgery start and additional doses if the surgery last 6 hours. The antibiotic dosing follows the national surgical site infection protocol.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


Usually in the recovery room, within an hour of your surgery ending.

How long will my surgery take?


Approximately 4 to 6 hours.

Preparing for your surgery


  • Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay
  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work. Arrange for help driving, heavy lifting, and caring for pets for the first few days.
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital
  • Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.
  • Do not drink alcohol 24 hours prior to surgery. Do not smoke at least 6 weeks prior to surgery.
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
    You will receive the after-hours number in your postoperative instructions.
  • Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors
  • Wear a button-front shirt and loose clothing to the clinic/hospital
    Wear easy to dress clothing such as loose pants with an elastic waistband and a comfortable shirt with a zip up front.

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


Yes. You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can get the information on our website or call my office for direction.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


Arrive one and an half hour before your scheduled surgery.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of your surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


History and physical, EKG, CBC, and metabolic panel for patients over 55 years of age. Thyroid panel for patients with thyroid disorders.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


You should stop taking NSAIDS, phentermine and tamoxifen two weeks prior to surgery and hormones one week prior to surgery. Please discuss tamoxifen, steroids, antimetabolites, and blood thinners with the prescribing doctor prior to scheduling your surgery. Are you able to stop them temporarily? Are you healthy for an elective surgery with general anesthesia? Take your AM blood pressure medications with a sip of water the morning of surgery.

Can you review my medication list with me?


Yes, your medication list will be reviewed during your consultation and your preoperative appointments. Please notify your surgeon of any changes or new medications at your preoperative appointment.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


You will meet with the anesthesiologist prior to the surgery in the preoperative area. You may arrange to speak to an anesthesiologist by telephone prior to your surgery date.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


I usually use local anesthesia with IV sedation.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


You may return to work as early as one week.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and feel able to drive.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


You should plan on recovering at home for one week. You cannot plan for heavy exercise for two to three weeks.

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


My patients usually go home once they have recovered from the anesthesia.

Will I have any drains or tubes put in during surgery and for how long?


Because of the technique that I use, drains and tubes are usually not necessary unless it is of extraordinary situation.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


You will discuss postoperative pain control with the surgeon at your postoperative appointment with your surgeon and receive a prescription.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


Pain is usually very minimal after surgery. My patients usually do not need to take any narcotic after 72 hours.

How long will it take for my neck to recover so that I can see its final shape?


You should have a normal working appearance at ten days to two weeks.

How long will any swelling and bruising in my neck last?


The majority of the swelling and bruising resolves within ten days to two weeks.

How will my neck feel after this surgery in the short and long-term?


Your neck will feel numbness and tight after surgery. The incision may be slightly tender or itchy.

Will my ability to swallow or eat be affected by this surgery?


This surgical should not affect your ability to swallow or eat.

Will this surgery affect my facial movements and expressions?


This surgical should not affect muscle movement. The immediate tightness from shifting the SMAS and subcutaneous dissection usually improves within the first few weeks after surgery.

Will I have any bandages on my neck after this surgery?


You will have dressing on your head and neck after surgery.

How long will this surgery take?


Approximately 4-6 hours.

Will I have any visible scars?


There will be scars hidden under the chin, temporal region, under the side burn, inside the ear, and behind the ear.

Where and how big will my incision be?


The incision length varies with the degree of skin excess. Generally the incision begins at the temporal region extending the edge of the side burn, hugs the inside of the ear, follows the crease of the earlobe and ends in the posterior ear crease.

How much will the surgery cost?


Please contact my office for the information.

How long should the results of the surgery last?


Because skin is excised and SMAS are shifted and tighten, your results will last many years and longer. It also helps if you maintain your skin with skin care products, no smoking, and sun avoidance. Periodic treatments with no invasive procedures such as Botox, fillers, micro laser or chemical peels and IPL can keep your look youthful look. If you lose significant weight, your results may loosen.

Can I have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time?


Yes. Blepharoplasty, fat transfer to the face, chemical peels and laser are commonly done at the same time.

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


Yes. There are photos on the website and more in the office.

Can I see different options for the possible results of my surgery?


Yes. There are photos on the website and more in the office.

How will my jawline be affected by this surgery?


Your jaw line should not be affected by this surgery. It should remain in the same orientation as before. The jaw line will be more distinct and define, giving the patient a more youthful look.

What surgical approach will you use?


The facelift is done in the subcutaneous plane and the skin is separated from the deep tissue I then mobilize and use resuspend the SMAS. Fat is then used to restore areas where fat and volume are lost due to aging.

What can I expect if I choose to delay this procedure?


This type of procedure is cosmetic and thus is not mandatory. It is dependent on when the patient is ready to go through with the procedure. The patient may explore other nonsurgical/surgical options in the meantime to see which procedure is best suited to their needs/expectations.

What can I expect if I choose not to have this procedure?


If you choose not to have the procedure done, you have other alternative to choose from (nonsurgical or surgical).

Are there any other surgical options?


Laser liposuction of the neck or subdermal tightening with the laser fiber can improve the jaw and neckline without the incisions, general anesthesia, or recovery of facelift. Fat transfer to the face can soften the stigmata of aging and restore volume to depleted cheeks and lips. These surgical options can be done in the office with local anesthesia.

What are my non-surgical options?


Skin care, chemical peels and laser can improve a youthful look with no significant downtime. Botox and filler injections can have a high impact on lines but need to be repeated in intervals.

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


The risks and complications are similar to other aesthetic surgery. They include local such as skin ischemia and loss and this is more common in smoker, hematoma, and nerve injury asymmetry. The systemic complications include blood clot and PE and other aesthesia risks. In healthy patients in the hands of board-certified Plastic Surgeons, the complication rates are in fact not very high.

What will this surgery do?


Facelift (necklift) will set back the clock. The cheeks will be more balance and reverse back to a more youthful V shape, firmer and more balance. The neck and jawline will appear smoother and younger.

Why do I need this surgery?


To reverse facial aging, sagging and heavy jowls and neck laxity. The surgery will help to change an aging square face to more V shape youthful face and to restore areas of the face that are hallowing from aging.

Post-operative management/instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Keep your incision clean and dry
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on wearing any supportive equipment for your belly
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions to reduce pressure on your abdomen when lying down by keeping your hips and legs bent
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

Call your doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • Your bandages are repeatedly soaked with blood
  • You have persistent numbness/tingling on your abdomen
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

Post-operative care


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

When can I resume sexual activity?


I suggest that you should avoid sexual activity for a few weeks.

When can I drive again?


You can usually drive 48 hours after surgery as long as you are not any narcotic medication.

When can I go back to work?


For clients that do light office work, return to work within the first week is possible. For clients who work in more physical demanding jobs, you can take up to 6 weeks after surgery.

How long will I need to wear any abdominal support equipment?


I like my patients to wear support binder for up to six weeks after surgery

When will my staples or sutures be removed?


The sutures are usually removed about 10 days after surgery.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


I usually like to see my patients the first one to two days after surgery.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


Our patient can do light activities at home. It is improve to walk slowly and also may need to lean forward for the first week or so.

When can I take a shower?


Because there is no drain usually, my patient can shower the next day. You should use a blow drier to dry the steristrips after shower.

How do I take care of my incision?


There will be steristrips applied over the wound. There is usually minimal care needed post-surgery.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Any mediation that can cause bleeding or alternate your medical condition need to be stopped or changed before surgery. I will be discussing with you in detail at pre-operative visit.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


You should have the medication filled before the day of surgery.

What can my activity level be today?


You should get out of bed and ambulate. It is a good idea to be leaning over when you are walking.

Were any medications started or changed today?


I usually send you home with oral pain medication and some antibiotics.

How does my incision look?


It will be a line at the lower portion of your abdomen and also around your umbilicus (belly button)

What’s the plan for today (labs, tests, procedures)?


This depends on your medical conditions and I will discuss this with you at your pre-operative consultation.

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will be given intra-operative medication; local block and oral and parental pain medication to make sure you are comfortable.

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to meet all the discharge criteria before you can go home.

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


My procedure is usually as an outpatient and you will be staying for a few hours after. I only let my patient go home if they are ready.

Do I need to do breathing exercises?


Breathing exercises after the procedure is improvement and my patients start in the recovery room after they are awake.

When can I eat or drink?


You can drink water and liquid shortly after the procedure.

When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed?


My usual protocol does not use drains, tubes or catheters because I use special closure technique to decrease the needs of these devices.

How are we preventing the formation of blood clots?


I use device such as support hose, venous pump during the procedure. For patients with increased risk of blood clot, pharmacological treatment may be used.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


I usually like you to continue with your usual medication with exception of medication that can cause bleeding. I will discuss this with you further.

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


This depends on your medical conditions and I will discuss this with you at your pre-operative consultation.

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

Before your surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms
    You will have time to review the consent and I like to make sure you understand and have asked all the questions that you may have.

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


I usually start antibiotics in the operating room, and you may take oral antibiotics for another 48 hours.

Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots?


If you have significant risks of DVT or pulmonary embolus, you will need to take blood-thinning medication.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


You usually wake up within 10 minutes from the procedure, and your family can see you within an hour from the procedure.

How long will it be until I wake up?


Our clients usually wake up within 10 minutes at the end of the procedure.

How long will my surgery take?


It usually takes two to three hours.

Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors?


You find my address on the web but it is printed on the postoperative sheet.

Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information?


The postoperative sheet has my office and cell number so you can contact us as needed.

Do not drink alcohol 24 hours before your surgery?


It is a good idea to abstain from alcohol 24 hours before surgery.

Stop smoking several weeks before your surgery?


I like having our clients stop smoking one week before surgery and two weeks after. If you cannot stop completely as least try to decrease the amount you smoke.

Stop eating and/or drinking as advised by your doctor?


My anesthesiologist and I prefer that one stop eating and drinking 6 hours before surgery. One can take medication with a small sip of water if the medication is indicated before surgery

Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)


I like to have close contact with our patients. If you have any concern before and after your surgery, please contact our office.

Call your doctor if you think of other questions?


You are given a number to call and/or text me after surgery.

Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery?


It is important that someone stay with you on the first night after surgery.

Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital?


See above

Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work?


It is a good idea to have someone take care of responsibilities at home and at work until you are ready to take care of these.

Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay?


N/A

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


You will need someone to take you home after surgery as driving is not permitted.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can call my office for direction. Our address is available online and one can also use mobile app for direction

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


We recommend that you arrive on the time indicated on your pre-operative instruction sheet before your surgery. We will also try you on your mobile phone if the time of surgery has been changed.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


My anesthesiologist and I prefer that one stop eating and drinking 6 hours before surgery. One can take medication with a small sip of water if the medication is indicated before surgery

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


For my patients, general lab tests such as CBC, electrolytes, liver function, INR, PTT, cardiogram are fairly routine. Other tests may be ordered if one has a special medical condition.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


In general, all medication that may cause bleeding or prolong bleeding time may need to be stopped or altered. One should not stop any medication without consulting with your family physician and the specialist that put you on these drugs.

Can you review my medication list with me?


I review all patient medications on initial consultation, pre-operative appointment and day of surgery.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


All my patients see the anesthesiologist before but usually on the day of surgery. For one who has special needs, I frequently arrange for consultation with anesthesiologist a few days before surgery.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


My procedure is usually done under general anesthesia but spine and region with sedation are also possible.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


This depends on the type of work. For people who are doing desk job and love to go back to work, return to modified work after 1 week is very common. For one who has a more physical intense job, one may take 6 to 8 weeks before one returns to modified work.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


In general, you should not drive the first 48 hours after surgery. Also, if you are taking heavy narcotics, one should not be driving. Most of my clients are usually driving after 3 to 4 days.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


You should be able to get back to 80% of your daily activities within one week. I encourage my patients to ambulate and resume light activities within a few days after surgery. You are encouraged to lean over when you are walking. We recommend that you do not do any heavy exercise or weight lift for four to six weeks.

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


I usually perform this surgery as an outpatient and everyone is able to go home the same day. You will be seen the following day or 2 days later.

Will I have any visible scars?


There will be scar around the umbilicus and at the lower abdominal region from the iliac crest over the pubic region to the other iliac crest.

Will I need any special equipment to help support my belly after this surgery?


I usually recommend using an abdominal binder for 6 weeks after the procedure.

Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long?


Because of the technique that I use to close the abdomen, drains and tubes are usually not necessary unless it is of extraordinary situation.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


You will receive injected pain medication into your abdominal wall during surgery and the evening of your surgery, you will be very comfortable. I usually prescribe Tylenol 3 and Percocet for a few days to a few weeks after surgery depending on your pain tolerance.

What will my belly area feel like after surgery in the short and long-term?


In general, you should have less fatty tissue, skin and tighter abdominal wall and muscle.

How long will any swelling, tenderness or discomfort last?


One usually fines the postoperative pain uncomfortable for the first two to three days after surgery. After the initial two to three days, the discomfort is usually very tolerable.

Will I have bandages on my abdomen after this surgery?


Yes, you will have bandages around the incision site.

What can I expect after my surgery?


See above

How much will this surgery cost?


The cost of the procedure starts at 6,000 – $6500

Should I have this surgery if I am planning on having children in the future?


Abdominoplasty should be done after one completes their family. If you got pregnant after the procedure, the procedure can be repeated again.

Is it possible to also have liposuction done during this surgery?


Liposuction is usually done together with the surgical excision of the abdominal wall.

How long will the surgery last?


The surgery usually takes 2 to 3 hours.

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


You can see pre and post-operative result in our office.

Can I see options for the possible results of my surgery?


You can see the surgical result the morning after the surgery. The final result usually takes 6 weeks to 6 months after surgery.

Where and how big will my incision be?


This usually involves the right to the left anterior superior iliac spine over the pubic region.

How extensive will this surgery be?


Surgery involves the lower anterior and lateral abdominal wall as possibly the deep abdominal wall muscle (rectus muscle).

What surgical technique will you use?


My usual procedure is a combination of liposuction tissue at the lateral portion of the abdominal incision and the epigastric region. The excessive abdominal pannus (fat) is then removed and the abdominal wall muscle is then tightened. The abdominal wall is then closed.

Are there any other surgical options?


Liposuction and abdominoplasty are other similar procedures and will give different results.

What are my non-surgical options?


Weight loss, exercise and some non-invasive procedure such as RF, ultrasound and freezing device. None of these devices can give the procedure result comparable to the abdominoplasty procedure.

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


There are general and local complications from the procedure. The general complication includes anesthesia risks, respiratory and airway risks such as pneumonia, aspiration, blood clots and pulmonary embolus. The local risks include infection, skin necrosis, scarring. Specific risks include change in skin sensation, skin contour irregularities, umbilicus mal-positioning or scarring, and pubic distortion.  Each one of the following will be described.

What will this surgery do?


It will remove excessive skin and fat at the inferior (lower half) of your abdomen. It will also tighten the abdominal muscle to strengthen the weaken abdominal wall from pregnancy

Post-operative instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Keep your incisions clean and dry
  • Wear a special supportive bra as long as advised by your doctor
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • You may resume most daily activities within a week from surgery. You should avoid heavy lifting or things that can elevate your blood pressure.
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

Call you doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • Your bandages are repeatedly soaked with blood
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

After your procedure


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy

Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy
Yes. If you cannot reach the doctor immediately, call 911.

When can I drive again?


In general, you should not drive the first 48 hours after surgery. Also if you are taking heavy necrotic, one should not be driving. Most of my clients are usually driving after 3 to 4 days.

When can I go back to work?


For most clients, you may return to work after one week. If you need to do heavy lifting the time requirement may be longer.

When can I resume sexual activity?


You may resume sexual activity at two to three weeks.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


You should avoid bending over or heavy lifting for two weeks.

How long will I need to wear a special supportive bra?


It is recommended that patients remain braless during the recovery process and if the patient wishes to wear a bra, they must make sure that the breast does not feel too tight.

When will my staples or sutures be removed?


The sutures will be removed 5 days post-operatively.

When will my bandages be removed?


Your bandages will be removed at your first follow-up appointment.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


You will follow up a day or two after surgery. Following this weekly appointment until you are fully recovered.

Are there any special instructions for caring for my breasts?


You should remove the bandage dressing after 24 hours and after the removal of the dressing, it is encouraged that you start on stretching exercises.

How do I take care of my incisions?


Yes, the postoperative instructions will be reviewed at your preoperative appointment. After the initial bandage is removed, apply polysporin or vitamin E to your incisions twice daily.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Yes, you will receive a list of medications to avoid prior to surgery and initially after surgery. Do not take NSAIDS, ibuprofen, or aspirin until your doctor approves.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


Tell the doctor or nurse which pharmacy you prefer. Non-narcotic medications such as Compazine may be sent electronically but narcotic pain medications must be printed and hand delivered to the pharmacy.

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will receive narcotic pain pill prescription to fill prior to surgery. You may receive IV pain medication if you need.

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to have instructions reviewed with a responsible adult and meet all discharge criteria.

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


You may be released once you have met all the discharge criteria.

When can I eat or drink?


You may eat and drink after surgery as soon as you feel well and not nauseated. Start with a soft, bland diet.

When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed?


For the majority of mastopexy patients, no drains or tubes are necessary.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


Discuss with your surgeon.

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


The antibiotics are stopped within 48 hours of surgery.

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

On the day of the surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
    Your driver’s license or identity such as OHIP number will need to be verified at your appointment and at the surgery center.
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed. Review the surgery specifics at your preoperative appointment and again the day of surgery.
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms
    Please also ask any questions if you need them to be clarifying.

 

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


You will receive IV antibiotic immediately prior to surgery start and additional doses if needed in the recovery room. The antibiotic dosing follows the national surgical site infection protocol.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


Usually in the recovery room, once you are awake.

How long will it be until I wake up?


Usually in the recovery room, within an hour of your surgery ending.

How long will my surgery take?


The surgery can take 1-2 hours.

Preparing for your surgery


  • Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay

  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
    Please arrange for help driving, heavy lifting, and caring for pets for the first few days.
  • You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
    You can call my office if you have any other questions.
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Stop eating and/or drinking as advised by your doctor
  • Do not drink alcohol 24 hours prior to surgery. Do not smoke at least 6 weeks prior to surgery.
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
    Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors
  • Wear a button-front shirt and loose clothing to the clinic/hospital. Wear easy to dress clothing such as loose pants with an elastic waistband and a comfortable shirt with a zip up front.

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


Yes. You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can get the information on our website or call my office for direction.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


Arrive one and an half hour before your scheduled surgery.

Should I shower with antibacterial soap the night before and/or morning of surgery?


Yes, you should shower before/night of the surgery to help keep the area clean and help reduce the risk of possible infections or contamination.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of your surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


History and physical, EKG, CBC, and metabolic panel for patients over 55 years of age. Thyroid panel for patients with thyroid disorders.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


When your medications are reviewed, the medications that need to be stopped will brought to your attention.

Can you review my medication list with me?


Yes, your medications will be reviewed prior to your procedure.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


You will meet with the anesthesiologist prior to the surgery in the preoperative area. You may arrange to speak to an anesthesiologist by telephone prior to your surgery date.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


I usually like the procedure to be done under general anesthesia.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


You can usually return to work less than a week. If your job is very physical than it may take a little longer.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and feel able to drive.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


You can resume essentially all normal daily activities after 48 hours.

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


The surgery is an outpatient surgery done in my own surgery center.

Will I have any visible scars?


You will have scar around your areola and also a vertical scar at the inferior pole of your breasts. For most patients the scar is too noticeable after a few months.

Will I need any special clothing after this surgery?


You should use a nice supporting bra after surgery.

Will I have any tubes, drains, and/or catheters put in during surgery and for how long?


I do not use any tubes, drains or catheters.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


You will discuss postoperative pain control with Dr. Hong at your pre-operative appointment and receive a prescription.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


Pain is usually very minimal after surgery. My patients usually do not need to take any narcotic after 72 hours.

Will this surgery affect my ability to breastfeed in the future?


Most of our patients can breastfeed normally after surgery.

How will my breasts feel after surgery in the short and long-term?


In general the breasts should feel fairly normal within a few weeks to few months.

How long will any swelling last?


The swelling should settle within a few weeks.

Will I have bandages on my chest after this surgery?


You will have compression dressing during your first 24 hours after surgery.

What can I expect after my surgery?


You should have improved correction of your breast position, projection and nipple areolar position.

How much will this surgery cost?


You can contact my office for an estimate cost. The actual cost will be discussed with you during the initial consultation after understanding your goal and after examination to decide the type of correction you need.

Is it possible to also get implants during this surgery?


If you have lost a lot of volume of your breasts and or you like to increase the size of your breasts, then you may want to have augmentation with implants at the same time.

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


Yes, this is found on my website or through consultation.

Can I see options for the possible results of my surgery?


You can certainly see pre and postoperative pictures in my office as well as on my website.

Where and how big will my incision be?


The incisions are usually around the areolar and vertically at the lower half of your breasts. It is very rare that you need a horizontal incision at the lower pole of her breasts.

Post-operative care/instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on bathing or swimming
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on caring for your hair and head
  • Keep your affected area clean and dry
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities

Why do I need this surgery?


If you are concern about changes to your abdomen and like to improve the loose skin and fat (pannus), stretch marks, and weakness of abdominal muscle after pregnancy or excessive weight gain, abdominoplasty may be an option for you Abdominoplasty surgery is not a treatment for those who are overweight. Obese individuals who intend to lose weight should postpone all forms of body-contouring surgery until a stable weight is reached.

Call your doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your affected area
  • You notice any infected discharge from your affected area
  • Your bandages are repeatedly soaked with blood
  • You have persistent stiffness or numbness/tingling of your scalp
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

How long will the results of this surgery last?


Once skin is removed and the position of breasts and nipples have been restore, the breasts should improve for a long time as you as you do not significant weight gain or loss. Also if the breasts are excessive large, the weight of your breasts can accelerate breast ptosis.

Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed?


If your procedure is FUT, your sutures need to be removed about 1 week to 10 days after surgery. If the procedure is FUE, there is no suture.

Are there any other surgical options?


If the ptosis is minimal and only secondary to decrease in volume, breast augmentation may help to restore the volume.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


You will be back to see me within the first week after the procedure.

What are my non-surgical options?


Surgery is really the only effective treatment if you have moderate to severe breast ptosis.

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


The risks and complications are similar to other aesthetic surgery. They include local such as hypertrophic scar and or keloid, asymmetry, skin ischemia and loss and hematoma this is more common in smoker. The systemic complications include blood clot and PE and other anesthesia risks. In healthy patients in the hands of board certified Plastic Surgeons, the complication rates are in fact not very high.

How are we going to manage my pain?


The pain is usually minimally and you will be given some Tylenol #3 or other medication depending on your allergy.

What is the goal of this surgery?


The surgery should place the breasts and the nipple areolar position in a more normal position.

When will I be ready to leave the clinic/hospital?


Usually within half hour after your surgery is over.

When can I take a shower?


You can take shower the day following your surgery.

On the day of the surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
    Your driver’s license or identity will need to be verified at your appointment and at the surgery center.
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

How long will my procedure take?


The procedure will take 4 to 10 hours depend on the type and number of grafts.

Preparing for surgery


  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work if needed
    It is a good idea but not absolutely necessary.
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information and directions to the clinic/hospital

Will I need someone to drive me home from the clinic/hospital?


It is generally recommend that an adult to drive you home.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can get the information on our website or call my office for direction.

What time should I arrive for my procedure?


You should come to the office half an hour before your surgery.

How will this surgery benefit me?


Mastopexy (breast lift) may improve the position of sagging breasts and the nipple areolar location

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


You can take your regular medication but should stop taking any blood thinner.

Can you review my medication list with me?


Yes, this will be done during your preoperative consultation.

What kinds of anesthesia or sedation can I have for this procedure?


You will be given sedation and then local anesthesia. After the initial local anesthesia, normally you will need any more sedation.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


You can usually get back to normal routine within 2 to 3 days.

What are my options for pain medications after the procedure?


You will be given some Tylenol #3 unless you are allergic to it. You usually do not need much pain medication after the second day.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


Pain is very minimal. Most of our patients do not need to take much pain medications one night after surgery.

Will I need to take any special precautions for my hair and head?


You should elevate your head for a few nights after surgery. You should not rub hard at your transplanted site.

Will I need any bandages after this procedure?


You will have a dressing on your donor site the night after your surgery. There is no need for dressing after day 2 posts operatively.

How long will it be before I can shower with my new hair?


You can shower with baby shampoo 3 days after your transplantation.

How many times will I need to come in before the hair restoration process is complete?


My follow up is 2 to 3 visits during the first few weeks. Following this every 2-3 months until your transplanted hair have fully grown.

How long will this procedure take?


The procedure will take 4 to 10 hours depend on the type and number of grafts.

Will I have any visible marks?


You will have a linear scar if your procedure is FUT and multiple small dots if your procedure is FUE.

Will I have an incision? If so, how big will it be?


You will have a linear scar if your procedure is FUT.

How much will this procedure cost?


The cost will depend on number of grafts and method of transplantation. This will be discussing with you in details during your initial consultation.

How long should the results last?


The result is usually permanent.

How long will it be until I can see the final results?


Your transplanted hair will start growing in 3 months but the final result is better appreciated in 6 to 12 months.

Where will you insert the hair grafts?


The hair is transplanted to the areas in the hair loss area and this will be discussed with you in details at the pre-operative consultation.

Post-operative instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Keep your incision clean and dry
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on wearing supportive clothing to reduce swelling
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

Will I have any permanent hair loss in the donor area?


Hairs that are transplanted are permanently gone, but it is usually not noticeable.

Call the doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating, or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • The skin around your incision(s) is dark, purple, or peeling
  • You have persistent numbness/tingling in the muscles near your surgical incision(s)
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

Where will you take the hair grafts from?


The donor site hair usually comes from the back of your scalp where it is usually sparse from hair loss.

After Surgery


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

What are the possible results for the different techniques?


With FUE and FUT, the transplantation is usually the same but the extraction methods are different.

When can I drive again?


What hair restoration technique will you use (ie. strip, follicular unit extraction)?


I do both FUE and FUT technique.

When can I go back to work?


When can I resume sexual activity?


What can I expect if I choose not to have this procedure?


Hair loss usually follow your genetic course unless it is altered by medicine (i.e. propecia) and / or surgery

What can my activity level be when I get home?


How long do I need to wear any special supportive clothing?


I like my patients to wear the compression garment for up to six weeks after surgery

 

When will my sutures be removed?


The sutures will be removed 5 days post-operatively.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


I usually like to see my patients the first one to two days after surgery.

Are there any special precautions I should take?


The compression garment needs to be worn all the time, excluding in the shower. You should start massaging the area and ultrasound within 1 week of surgery. The more massaging, the better the results. The patient should take control of their diet as well.

How do I take care of my incision?


You should keep the area clean with minimal contact and avoid swimming.

 

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Any mediation that can cause bleeding or alternate your medical condition need to be stopped or changed before surgery. I will be discuss with you in detail at pre operative visit.

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


Yes you can see before and after pictures in my office.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


You should have the medication filled before the day of surgery.

 

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will be given intra-operative medication, local block and oral and parental pain medication to make sure you are comfortable.

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to meet all the discharge criteria before you can go home.

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


My procedure is usually as an outpatient and you will be staying for a few hours after. I only let my patient go home if they are ready.

When can I eat or drink?


You can drink water and liquid shortly after the procedure.

What are the possible results for the different techniques?


With FUE and FUT, the transplantation is usually the same but the extraction methods are different.

When can I have my drains or tubes removed?


My usual protocol does not use drains, tubes or catheters because I use special closure technique to decrease the needs of these devices.

What hair restoration technique will you use (ie. strip, follicular unit extraction)?


I do both FUE and FUT technique.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


I usually like you to continue with your usual medication with exception of medication that can cause bleeding. I will discuss this with you further.

What can I expect if I choose not to have this procedure?


Hair loss usually follow your genetic course unless it is altered by medicine (i.e. propecia) and / or surgery

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


This depends on your medical conditions and I will discuss this with you at your pre operative consultation.

 

How soon would you recommend that I have this procedure?


It is mostly a patient decision.

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

The Day of Surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
  • Make sure the correct side of your surgery has been marked
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

Do I have any other options?


Accepting alopecia, wearing hairpiece or shaving your scalp is all reasonable alternative.

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


I usually start antibiotics in the operating room, and you may take oral antibiotics for another 48 hours.

What are the risks and possible complications of this procedure?


The risks of the procedure are usually minimal. A full list of all possible complications will be provided to you during our initial consultation.

Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots?


If you have significant risks of DVT or pulmonary embolus, you will need to take blood-thinning medication.

What will this procedure do?


Our office performs both FUT and FUE to restore your lost hair.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


You usually wake up within 10 minutes from the procedure, and your family can see you within an hour from the procedure.

How long will it be until I wake up?


Our clients usually wake up within 10 minutes at the end of the procedure.

How long will my surgery take?


Depending on the amount of body parts the patient wishes to perform on, the surgery can last 1-3 hours.

Preparing for Surgery


  • Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay
  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital
  • Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Stop eating and/or drinking as advised by your doctor
  • Do not smoke or drink alcohol 24 hours before your surgery
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
  • Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


It is not recommended for the patients to drive themselves home.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


It can be found on my website, by calling or our mobile app.

 

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


It is recommended that patient come 30 minutes prior to surgery.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


Patient should not eat or drink 6 hours before surgery.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


For my patients, general lab tests such as CBC, electrolytes, liver function, INR, PTT, cardiogram are fairly routine, Other tests may be ordered if one has special medical condition.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


In general, all medication that may cause bleeding or prolong bleeding time may need to be stopped or alter. One should not stop any medication without consulting with your family physician and the specialist that put you on these drugs.

Can you review my medication list with me?


I review all patient medications on initial consultation, pre operative appointment and day of surgery.

Are there any activities I need to avoid after surgery?


If the ganglion cyst is at the wrist, you should rest your hand for 1 week before starting any physical therapy or activity. Please protect with wrist with a removable splint. You should avoid swimming or tub bathing until your incision is completely healed (10-14days) and sutures are removed from the incision site.

What is the cause of ganglion cyst?


The most commonly accepted cause of ganglion cysts is the herniated hypothesis where it is thought that cysts arise from weakening of the joint capsule/tendon sheath based on the idea that these cysts are often found along joint spaces/tendinous sheaths and the fluid found in these cavities are often similar to fluid found in joint spaces.

Why do I need surgery if the cyst can be removed using a simple needle?


  • There are different factors that helps determine whether the cyst should be removed surgically or simply aspirated with a needle.

The size of the cyst and location of the cyst may make it harder/easier to aspirate. For example, if the cyst is large and very superficial, it is accessible for aspiration

The consistency of the fluid in the cyst. Sometimes the fluid can be thickened and make it hard to aspirate/express the fluid from the sac.

There are higher rates or recurrence when the cyst is aspirated as the lining of the cyst is not remove when it is aspirated opposed to surgical excision which usually removes the cyst intact.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


Yes, an anesthesiologist will consult with the patient before the surgery.

 

Some friends/family or my family doctor said I can smash the cyst with a large book. Can I do that?


Although these cysts are benign, sometimes if it is located at an area where is frequent contact with other surfaces causing irritation and discomfort. In the distant past, people have use large books, such as the bible, to forcibly burst these cysts. Giving ganglion cyst the nick name of “bible cyst”. Although this is one method of dealing with the cyst, it is not recommended as it can often cause injury to other areas and there are other tumours that can mimic ganglion cyst.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


The choice of anesthesia will depend on the patient’s medical history and what the anesthesiologist would recommend.

What are the different methods of treating a ganglion cyst?


Typically, there are two ways to treat a cyst. If these sacs are managed earlier, the fluid in the sac isn’t too thick and can be aspirated from the sac using a large size needle. However, sometimes depending on location or the consistency of the fluid, you may need a surgical excision of the sac.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


It takes around 2-4 weeks to return to normal activity.

What is a ganglion cyst?


A ganglion cyst is a benign fluid filled sack typically found in the hands/wrist area but has been seen over almost all joints of the body. This sack is typically filled synovial fluid which is a gel like fluid that is found in joint spaces.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


It takes around 2-4 weeks to return to normal activity.

Call the doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • Your dressing is repeatedly soaked with blood
  • You experience weakness, numbness/tingling, or a coolness in your affected hand or foot
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control
  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Keep your incision clean and dry
  • Keep your affected hand or foot elevated to reduce swelling
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


It takes around 2-4 weeks to return to normal activity.

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


This surgery is an outpatient surgery and patients can leave the clinic whenever they are ready to go and after they have been checked.

Post-operative care


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

Will I have any visible scars?


The incision site is very small so the scarring will be indistinct.

When can I drive again?


There is no restrictions to driving after surgery.

Will I need any special clothing to wear around my surgical area?


A compression garment should be worn at all times, other than when you shower.

When can I go back to work?


You can return to work the following day after surgery. You can resume work while wearing the removable splint if the ganglion cyst was at the wrist.

Will I have any tubes, drains, and/or catheters put in during surgery and for how long?


Because of the technique that I use to close the incision, drains and tubes are usually not necessary unless it is of extraordinary situation.

When can I resume sexual activity?


There is no restrictions to sexual activity before/after surgery.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


You will receive injected pain medication into your surgical area during surgery and the evening of your surgery, you will be very comfortable. I usually prescribe tylenol 3 and percocet for a few days to a few weeks after surgery depending on your pain tolerance.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


With the exception of intense sports, you can resume your normal activity after surgery. Please wear a removable splint to protect the surgery site if your ganglion cyst was located in the wrist area.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


The degree of pain should be minimal. Patients usually feel some sort of discomfort and swelling but that will subside as time goes by.

When will my staples or sutures be removed?


Sutures are removed 10-14 days after your surgery. We will set up a date for you to return to have that done.

How often do I need to go for physical therapy?


You may or may not need 1-2 physical therapy sessions depending on the size and location of your ganglion cyst.

How will the surgical area feel after surgery in the short and long-term?


In general, you should feel more confident on the long run and be excited of your new body. In the long term, patients should maintain their new figure through a healthy diet and regular exercise.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


You should return for a follow up appointment approximately 10-14 days after surgery for suture removal.

How long will it take for the surgical area to recover so that I can see its final shape?


Full recovery could range from 1 to 6 months.

When can I use my affected hand or foot again?


If the ganglion cyst is at the wrist, you should rest your hand for 1 week prior to physical therapy and exercises. If the cyst was in the fingers/toes, you can use your affected hand/foot immediately after surgery.

How long will any swelling, tenderness, and discomfort last?


Full recovery of these side effects could range from 1 to 6 months.

Will I have bandages after this surgery?


Yes, there will be a bandage after the surgery and a compression garment is wrapped.

What can I expect after my surgery?


It is possible for the patient to have skin discolouration, irregularities of skin surfaces, bruising, swelling, numbness, soreness, and burning sensations.

 

How do I take care of my incision?


After 24-48hrs, you can remove all the dressing around your surgical site. You can wash your hand like normal, allowing soap and water to run over the incision site. Please do not rub the incision as the stitches can come apart. Polysporin can be applied to the surgical site. No bandages are needed to cover the area after 48hrs.

Where and how big will my incision be?


A small incision will be made near the targeted area of fat then a small and thin tube called a cannula is inserted into the incision. The scarring should be small and indistinct.

How are we going to manage my pain?


If you experience and post-operative pain, you should take some over the counter pain medications such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or Ibuprofen (Advil/Motrin).

How much will this surgery cost?


Liposuction start from $3,955

When can I eat or drink?


There is no restrictions to eating or drinking prior to or after surgery.

What are the chances that I may need additional procedures after this surgery?


If the patient does not commit to maintaining the shape of their body after surgery, they will need to undergo another surgery to remove the fat.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


With the exception of blood thinners, most prescription drugs do not need to be stopped and can be continued throughout the day of the procedure. Blood thinners can be restarted after surgery.

How long will the results of this surgery last?


It could last for a long time but this will all depends on how well the patient is able to maintain a healthy diet and their commitment to exercising. It is also noted that as the patient ages, their metabolism will slow down as well and thus it is more easily for them to store fat.

How did my procedure go?


Unless your surgeon specifically says otherwise, your surgery went according to plan without complications.

On the day of the procedure


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
  • Make sure the correct side of your surgery has been marked
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

Is it possible to have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time?


Yes, it is possible for other cosmetic procedures to be done in one surgery, depending on the amount of stress the patient will undergo during recovery and the length of the procedure.

Will this surgery affect my movement and flexibility?


It should not effect your movement and flexibility.

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


Since this procedure is performed sterilely, no antibiotics is needed for this surgery.

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


These photos may be found on my website or during consultation.

What are the possible options for what I may look like after my surgery?


You will look slimmer but the texture and smoothness of your skin will vary, depending on your age, quality of your skin tone, and skin elasticity.

How long will it be until I wake up?


You are typically awake for the whole procedure.

What is the maximum amount of fat that can be removed during this surgery?


In theory, there are no limitations, however this will depend on the size of the patient. The smaller they are, the less fat can be removed. If too much fat is removed, their body can go into shock.

How long will my surgery take?


Surgery usually takes about 20 minutes total. After consent is signed, an injection is made into the local area where the incision is made. After 10-15 minutes, when the anesthesia is in full effect, surgery is usually completed within 5-10 minutes.

Can I have liposuction done on different parts of my body during the same surgery?


Yes, it is possible under certain conditions. It is better to space the amount of surgery to avoid removing too much fat at once.

Preparation for surgery


  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Do not smoke or drink alcohol 24 hours before your surgery
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
  • Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors

What surgical technique will you use (ie. tumescent liposuction, super-wet technique, ultrasound-assisted liposuction, etc)?


I use all combination of the surgical techniques listed, which type of combination I will pick will vary depending on the type of patient.

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


If comfortable, you should be able to drive after surgery.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


Please call the office at (416)222-6986 to see your scheduled date and time for your surgery. This surgery is usually performed at two different hospital sites: Mackenzie Health Center or Rouge Valley Centenary Hospital. Once your appointment is set, you will be directed to the correct site.

Are there any other surgical options?


Another surgical option would be tummy tuck and fat grafting but tummy tuck is best accompanied with liposuction.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


You should arrive at your appointment time for surgery.

Are there any other surgical options?


Another surgical option would be tummy tuck and fat grafting but tummy tuck is best accompanied with liposuction.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


There are no diet and fluid restrictions prior to or after surgery.

What are my non-surgical options?


Individuals may look into nonsurgical fat reductions, changing their lifestyle/habits, waist clinchers, fat burning pills and tropical creams, however results will vary and may not be as effective.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


Typically no other tests is required prior to surgery. However, certain individuals on specific types of blood thinners may need a blood test immediately prior to surgery.

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


The patient’s skin may have rippling, bagginess or experience pigment changes and asymmetry. Another possible but unlikely risk/complications are fluid retention/loss, shock, infections, bleeding, reaction to anesthesia, and permanent numbness.

What will this surgery do?


Liposuction will reduce the amount of fat in a targeted area. Ideally, this surgery will slim down or create a more proportional look for the body.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


Generally, blood thinners should be stopped prior to surgery. However, different types of blood thinners should be stopped for different durations prior to surgery. Your family physician should be consulted as to when and if you should stop your medication prior to surgery.

Post-operative care/instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications. Narcotic pain medications impair your ability to drive.
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Keep your incision clean and dry
  • Wear supportive apparel as long as advised by your doctor
    I usually prefer my clients to wear compression garment for up to six weeks after the procedure.
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • You may resume most daily activities within a week from surgery. You should avoid heavy lifting or things that can elevate your blood pressure.
  • You may resume sexual activity at two to three weeks.

Can you review my medication list with me?


Your medication list will be reviewed prior to surgery. However, you should also review your medication with your family doctor as well.

Call your doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • Your dressing is repeatedly soaked with blood
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

After your procedure


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


Since only local anesthesia is used, it is not required that you see an anesthesiologist

When can I resume sexual activity?


You may resume sexual activity at two to three weeks.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


Local anesthesia is used for this procedure.

When can I drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and you feel capable of driving.

When can I go back to work?


For most clients, you may return to work after one week. If you need to do heavy lifting the time requirement may be longer.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


You can return to work the next day.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


You should avoid bending over or heavy lifting for two weeks.

How long will I need to wear supportive apparel? (if applicable)


Your sutures will be removed about 7 to 10 days after your surgery.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


You can drive immediately after surgery.

Why do I need this surgery?


If you have difficulties in losing fat in stubborn areas and believe that working out and dieting are not adequate solutions to get rid of the fat in these areas.

Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed?


Questions to Ask After My Surgery

When will my bandages be removed?


Your bandages will be removed at your first follow-up appointment.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


It requires 10-14 days for the incision to be completely healed. During that time, there is no restrictions to activities exception for intense sports that may cause the sutures to open up. Prompt usage of the hand is actually encourage and will help with the recovery process.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


You will follow up a day or two after surgery. Following this weekly appointment until you are fully recovered.

When can I take a shower?


You can take your first shower the day after surgery.

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


This is outpatient surgery and no overnight stay is needed.

Are there any special instructions for caring for my breasts?


Yes, the postoperative instructions will be reviewed at your preoperative appointment. After the initial bandage is removed, apply polysporin or vitamin E to your incisions twice daily.

How do I take care of my incisions?


You may shower after the first postoperative visit. Use a gentle shampoo to wash your hair such as baby shampoo. Pat dry and apply polysporin ointment if you like. Please wash your hand prior to touching your wound.

Will I need physical therapy and for how long?


Depending on the size and location of the cyst, you may or may not need any physical therapy. If you need any physical therapy session, you will be notified at the completion of your surgery and we will help set that up for you.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Yes, you will receive a list of medications to avoid prior to surgery and initially after surgery. Do not take NSAIDS, ibuprofen, or aspirin until your doctor approves.

Will I have any tubes or packing put in during surgery and for how long?


Typically there is no packing or tubing in the surgical site. You should expect the surgical site to be dressed with some superficial dressing.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


Tell the doctor or nurse which pharmacy you prefer. Non-narcotic medications such as Compazine may be sent electronically but narcotic pain medications must be printed and hand delivered to the pharmacy.

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will receive narcotic pain pill prescription to fill prior to surgery. You may receive IV pain medication if you need.

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to have instructions reviewed with a responsible adult.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


If you experience and post-operative pain, you should take some over the counter pain medications such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or Ibuprofen (Advil/Motrin).

When can I eat or drink?


You may eat and drink after surgery as soon as you feel well and not nauseated. Start with a soft, bland diet.

When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed?


For the majority of gynecomastia patients, no drains or tubes are necessary.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


There should be minimal pain after surgery. You may experience some soreness or bruise like sensation over the incisional site.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


Discuss with your surgeon.

How long will this surgery take?


Surgery usually takes about 20 minutes total. After consent is signed, an injection is made into the local area where the incision is made. After 10-15 minutes, when the anesthesia is in full effect, surgery is usually completed within 5-10 minutes.

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


The antibiotics are stopped within 48 hours of surgery.

Why do I need this procedure?


You are losing your hair with receding frontal hairline or have baldness at the vertex and want to replace lost areas.

What will my scar look like?


The size of the scar will be approximately the size of the cyst. Over a 3-6-month duration, the incisional scar will fade in colour.

How did my procedure go?


Please tell your surgeon if they may discuss your surgery with your ride home or if a significant other needs to be called.

Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms?


Yes. Please also ask any questions if you need them to be clarifying.

How will this surgery impact my movement or flexibility and for how long?


Recovery time varies according to the size and location of the cyst. If the cyst is small, and superficial, it usually requires about 10-14 days for the incision to be completely healed and should not significantly affect the function of the hand/wrist (where it is most commonly located). However, if the cyst is more extensive in size or is located in areas that has caused significant distortion to the anatomy and function of the hand, it may require a more extensive recovery process, including some physical therapy for strength and stretching exercises.

Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have?


Yes.

Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked?


Yes, you will be marked while you are awake in the preoperative area. Communicate with your surgeon.

What are the chances that the cyst will come back after this surgery?


The range of reoccurrence is from 12-41% but this depends on the patient’s genetic predisposition as well as frequency of use.

Make sure you have confirmed the surgery you are having?


Yes, review the surgery specifics at your preoperative appointment and again the day of surgery.

Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth?


Yes. Your driver’s license or identity such as OHIP number will need to be verified at your appointment and at the surgery center.

How extensive will this surgery be?


This is usually a minor surgery where an incision approximately the size of the cyst is made to remove the cyst intact. However, depending on the size and location of the cyst, sometimes surgical excision can be more extensive.

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


You will receive IV antibiotic immediately prior to surgery start and additional doses if needed in the recovery room. The antibiotic dosing follows the national surgical site infection protocol.

What can I expect if I choose to delay or chose not to have this surgery?


The outcome of not intervening on these cysts can vary. Sometimes cyst may become larger, it may decrease in size and disappear and/or it can remain the same over long periods of time.

Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots?


If you are healthy and has no risk factors, medication to prevent blood clots are usually not necessary.

How soon would you recommend that I have this surgery?


Removal of the cyst is not urgent and you can choose when it is convenient if you chose to have the cyst surgically removed.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


Usually in the recovery room, once you are awake.

How long will it be until I wake up?


Usually in the recovery room, within an hour of your surgery ending.

What are my non-surgical options?


If you are not experiencing any problems from the cyst, you may choose to not receive any treatments and with small cyst, it can go away on it's own. However, typical non-surgical management involves aspirating/expressing the fluid using a large size needle to open up the sac. (Please seek professional management as using non-sterile needles can causing infections to nearby joints and may cause injury to other areas the hand).

How long will my surgery take?


Approximately 1 to 2 hours.

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


Risk include normal surgical risk such as wound infection and damage to surrounding tissue, which include the nerves and tendons that may run close to the cyst. Other possible risk includes joint infection and possible recurrence

A complete list of possible risks and complications and their explanation can be found at:http://www.drcolinhong.com/learn/risks-and-complications/ganglion-cyst/

Preparation for surgery


  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
  • Arrange for help driving, heavy lifting, and caring for pets for the first few days.
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital. You cannot drive yourself home after facelift.
  • Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
    You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
    You can call my office if you have any other questions.
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.
  • Do not drink alcohol 24 hours prior to surgery. Do not smoke at least 6 weeks prior to surgery.
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
  • Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors
    You will receive the surgery location and directions at your preoperative appointment.
  • Wear a button-front shirt and loose clothing to the clinic/hospital. Wear easy to dress clothing such as loose pants with an elastic waistband and a comfortable shirt with a zip up front.

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


Yes. You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.

What will this surgery do?


This surgery attempts to remove the cyst intact which includes the fluid and the sac containing the fluid.

Post-operative management/instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
    Yes, narcotic pain medications impair your ability to drive.
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Keep your incision clean and dry
  • Elevate your head when laying down to reduce swelling in your face
  • Use cold compresses on your face to reduce swelling as advised by your doctor
  • Avoid wearing clothes that is worn by going over your head
  • Do not smoke as it could delay healing
    Smoking is dangerous for facelift. You should discuss with your surgeon if you not able to quit smoking at least 4 weeks before and 4 weeks after surgery. Skin necrosis, difficulty healing, unsatisfactory result, and unsightly scarring can result from smoking.
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Wear easy to dress, zip up the front clothing.
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can get the information on our website or call my office for direction.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


Arrive one and an half hour before your scheduled surgery.

Call your doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • Your bandages are repeatedly soaked with blood
  • You have persistent stiffness, numbness/tingling, or weakness of your face
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

After the procedure


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of your surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.

When can I resume sexual activity?


You may resume sexual activity at two to three weeks.

When can I drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and you feel capable of driving.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


History and physical, EKG, CBC, and metabolic panel for patients over 55 years of age. Thyroid panel for patients with thyroid disorders.

When can I go back to work?


Most patients are able to return to their normal routine in a week

What can my activity level be when I get home?


You should avoid bending over or heavy lifting for two weeks.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


You should stop taking NSAIDS, phentermine and tamoxifen two weeks prior to surgery and hormones one week prior to surgery. Please discuss tamoxifen, steroids, antimetabolites, and blood thinners with the prescribing doctor prior to scheduling your surgery. Are you able to stop them temporarily? Are you healthy for an elective surgery with general anesthesia? Take your AM blood pressure medications with a sip of water the morning of surgery.

Do I have sutures that need to be removed?


The sutures can be removed within a week after the surgery

Can you review my medication list with me?


Yes, your medication list will be reviewed during your consultation and your pre-operative appointments. Please notify your surgeon of any changes or new medications at your preoperative appointment.

When will my bandages be removed?


Your bandages will be removed at your first follow-up appointment.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


My patients can shower the next day.

Call your doctor if…


      • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
      • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
      • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
      • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
      • Your bandages are repeatedly soaked through with blood
      • You have persistent stiffness, numbness/tingling, or weakness of your face
      • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

      Please ensure that you..

      • know when and how to take my medications at home
      • will not drive while on prescription pain medications
      • will keep my incision clean and dry
      • will call my doctor if I have any questions about recovery or feel something is not right
      • will go to the post-op appointment with my healthcare team
      • will avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as my healthcare team advises
      • will follow my healthcare team’s instructions on bathing and swimming
      • will follow my doctor’s instructions on when to resume daily activities and sexual activity
      • will elevate my head when laying down to reduce swelling in my face
      • will use cold compresses on my face to reduce swelling for the first two days
      • will not smoke as it could delay healing
      • will avoid wearing clothing that is worn by going over my head

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


You will meet with the anesthesiologist prior to the surgery in the preoperative area. You may arrange to speak to an anesthesiologist by telephone prior to your surgery date.

When can I take a shower?


You should get out of bed and ambulate. It is a good idea to be leaning over when you are walking.

Before I get discharged


  • Check with my healthcare team about which medications I should take at home
  • My prescription medications have been filled and I know when and how to take them
  • I will ask my healthcare team how to care for myself and my incision at home
  • I have scheduled my post-op appointment
  • I have a ride home today and someone will stay with me tonight

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


I usually like the procedure to be done under general anesthesia.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Any mediation that can cause bleeding or alternate your medical condition need to be stopped or changed before surgery. I will be discussing with you in detail at pre-operative visit.

After your procedure


  • Make sure my healthcare team wash their hands before and after my care
  • I will not wait until my pain is severe before asking for pain medication
  • I will sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before I stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • I will not get out of bed without help if I feel weak or dizzy
  • I understand which medications I am taking while in the hospital
  • I will ask the healthcare team if I received blood thinners to prevent blood clots
  • Spend at least 6 hours out of bed
  • Walk around in the hallway
  • I will start eating and drinking as recommended

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


You should have the medication filled before the day of surgery.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


You can usually return to work less than a week. If your job is very physical than it may take a little longer.

How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my face?


Gently apply ice on the area but try not apply any pressure

When can I drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and you feel capable of driving.

Are there any special instructions for caring for my face?


Patients should avoid applying any pressure in the chin area for about a month and you should use a special pillow (U-shaped) when you lie down

How do I take care of my incisions?


Incision should be kept clean and dry.

When can I go back to work?


For most clients, you may return to work after one week. If you need to do heavy lifting or if you are in front of the camera the time requirement may be longer.

How does my incision look?


This depends on your medical conditions and I will discuss this with you at your pre-operative consultation.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and feel able to drive.

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will be given intra-operative medication; local block and oral and parental pain medication to make sure you are comfortable.

When can I resume sexual activity?


You may resume sexual activity at two to three weeks.

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to meet all the discharge criteria before you can go home.

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the clinic/hospital?


My procedure is usually as an outpatient and you will be staying for a few hours after. I only let my patient go home if they are ready.

When can I eat or drink? Are there any limitations?


You can drink water and liquid shortly after the procedure.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


I usually like you to continue with your usual medication with exception of medication that can cause bleeding. I will discuss this with you further.

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

Will I need any supportive apparel after this surgery?


I usually prefer my clients to wear tight chest compression garment for up to 6 weeks after surgery.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


You should avoid bending over or heavy lifting for two weeks.

On the day of your surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
    If you have significant risks of DVT or pulmonary embolus, you will need to take blood-thinning medication.
  • Make sure you have confirmed the surgery you are having
    My OR nurse will check and confirm this before and just before surgery.
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
    My OR nurse will check and confirm this before and just before surgery.
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
    My OR nurse will check and confirm this before surgery.
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms
    You will have time to review the consent and I like to make sure you understand and have asked all the questions that you may have.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


You should avoid bending over or heavy lifting for two weeks.

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


I usually start antibiotics in the operating room, and you may take oral antibiotics for another 48 hours.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


You can usually return to work less than a week. If your job is very physical than it may take a little longer.

When will my staples or sutures be removed?


The sutures in front of the ear are typically removed at one week and the sutures behind the ear are removed at two weeks.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


You usually wake up within 10 minutes from the procedure, and your family can see you within an hour from the procedure.

When will my bandages be removed?


Your bandages will be removed at your first follow-up appointment.

How long will it be until I wake up?


Our clients usually wake up within 10 minutes at the end of the procedure.

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


The surgery is usually performed as an outpatient.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


You will follow up a day or two after surgery. Following this weekly appointment until you are fully recovered.

How long will my surgery take?


The surgery could take around 30 minutes to an hour

Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long?


I do not usually use drain after the procedure. However, if there may be a lot of drainage after the procedure, a small drain may be placed.

Preparing for surgery


  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital
    It is a good idea to have someone take care of responsibilities at home and at work until you are ready to take care of these.
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
    It is important that someone stay with you on the first night after surgery.
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • You are given a number to call and /or text me after surgery.
  • Stop eating and/or drinking as advised by your doctor
    My anesthesiologist and I prefer that one stop eating and drinking 6 hours before surgery. One can take medication with a small sip of water if the medication is indicated before surgery
  • I like having our clients stop smoking one week before surgery and two weeks after. If you cannot stop completely as least, try to decrease the amount you smoke. It is a good idea to abstain from alcohol 24 hours before surgery.
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
  • Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors
  • Wear a button-front shirt and loose clothing to the clinic/hospital
    The postoperative sheet has my office and cell number so you can contact us as needed.

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


You need someone to take you home after surgery as driving is not permitted.

How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my face?


Keep your face elevated and ice.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can call my office for direction. Our address is available online and one can also use mobile app for direction

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


You will be given mild narcotic during the first few days after surgery follow by extra strength Tylenol after a few days.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


We recommend that you arrive 30 minutes before your surgery. We will also try you on your mobile phone if the time of surgery has been changed.

Are there any special instructions for caring for my face?


Yes, the postoperative instructions will be reviewed at your preoperative appointment. After the initial bandage is removed, apply polysporin or vitamin E to your incisions twice daily.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


My anesthesiologist and I prefer that one stop eating and drinking 6 hours before surgery. One can take medication with a small sip of water if the medication is indicated before surgery

What can I expect my pain to be like?


The pain is usually mild to moderate in the first few days to one to two weeks. Mild narcotic or even plain Tylenol may be enough for average patients.

How do I take care of my incisions?


Just keep your wound clean and dry.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


For my patients, general lab tests such as CBC, electrolytes, liver function, INR, PTT, cardiogram are fairly routine, Other tests may be ordered if one has special medical condition.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


In general, all medication that may cause bleeding or prolong bleeding time may need to be stopped or alter. One should not stop any medication without consulting with your family physician and the specialist that put you on these drugs.

Will this surgery affect any future tests I may have?


Usually not

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Yes, you will receive a list of medications to avoid prior to surgery and initially after surgery. Do not take NSAIDS, ibuprofen, or aspirin until your doctor approves.

Can you review my medication list with me?


I review all patient medications on initial consultation, pre-operative appointment and day of surgery.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


All my patients see the anesthesiologist before but usually on the day of surgery. For one who has special needs, I frequently arrange for consultation with anesthesiologist a few days before surgery.

How will my breasts feel after surgery in the short and long-term?


Immediately after the procedure, the chest wall can feel numb and may have swelling and some lumpiness. The long-term result is usually good but some residual irregularity to the contour is not uncommon.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


Tell the doctor or nurse which pharmacy you prefer. Non-narcotic medications such as Compazine may be sent electronically but narcotic pain medications must be printed and hand delivered to the pharmacy.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


My procedure is usually done under general anesthesia.

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will receive narcotic pain pill prescription to fill prior to surgery. You may receive IV pain medication if you need.

How long will any swelling last?


The swelling usually last 2 weeks to 6 months.

 

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


You should be able to get back to 80% of your daily activities within one week. I encourage my patients to ambulate and resume light activities within a few days after surgery. .

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to have instructions reviewed with a responsible adult.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


In general, you should not drive the first 48 hours after surgery. Also if you are taking heavy necrotic, one should not be driving. Most of my clients are usually driving after 3 to 4 days.

Will I have bandages on my chest after this surgery?


You will be given a compression garment after the procedure.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


I usually perform this surgery as an outpatient and everyone is able to go home the same day. You will be seen the following day or 2 days later.

When can I eat or drink?


You may eat and drink after surgery. Start with a soft, bland diet.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


I usually prescribe Tylenol 3 and Percocet for a few days to a few weeks after surgery depending on your pain tolerance.

How long will this surgery take?


The surgery usually take from 1 to 3 hours depend on the size and complexity of the procedure.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


The pain will be minimal and should go away within a week. Mostly, the surgical area will feel more sensitive than usual.

How will my face feel after this surgery in the short and long-term?


In the beginning, you will feel numbness, swelling, bruising and restriction in facial movement. On the long run, all of these symptoms should subside.

How are we preventing the formation of blood clots?


You will have sequential compression devices applied to your legs prior in induction of anesthesia. You will be encouraged to stand up and walk as soon as possible after surgery.

How much will this surgery cost?


You can discuss cost during the initial consultation after the examination to determine the size of gynecomastia and whether there are additional works that need to be done.

How long will it take for my face to recover so that I can see its final shape?


For full recovery/healing, it should take around 3-4 months.

How long will any swelling, tenderness and discomfort in my face last?


All of these symptoms should only last for the first week after surgery.

How often do you do this type of surgery?


This surgery is performed frequently in my office.

Will I have bandages after this surgery?


Yes.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


Discuss with your surgeon.

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


You can see pre and postoperative result on my website. Additional photos can be reviewed at my office.

Will I have any visible scars?


Yes, under the chin but it is well hidden and even if the face is elevated, the scarring is faint.

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


The antibiotics are stopped within 48 hours of surgery.

Where and how big will my incision be?


The incision will be under your chin and in the area behind your lip. The incision length is not that long due to the small curvature of the chin.

Can I see options for the possible results of my surgery?


Yes

How much will the surgery cost?


The surgery should cost around $3,000, however this price will vary from patient to patient.

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

How long will the results of the surgery last?


The results should last for a lifetime as long as there are no complications

Will I have any visible scars?


The small are usually small and not too visible unless you develop keloid after the procedure.

How will my ability to eat be affected in the short-term?


You may have trouble eating larger portions of food or any food that requires more effort to chew, however as you continue to heal, this becomes less of an issue.

On the day of the surgery


  • I confirmed my name and date of birth with my healthcare team
  • I confirmed my surgery with my healthcare team
  • I made sure the correct site of my surgery was marked
  • I confirmed my allergies with my healthcare team
  • I understood and signed the consent forms

Will this surgery affect my facial movements and expressions?


In the beginning, you will experience tightness and it will be a little difficult to make facial expressions, however this will subside within time

Where and how big will my incision be?


The incisions are usually fairly small and they are usually at the lateral inferior portion of the chest wall, possible at the medial portion as well as the inferior portion of the nipples.

Is it possible to have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time?


Yes, genioplasty is usually accompanied with rhinoplasty to achieve a more optimal result

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


You can see pre and post-operative result in our office.

What are the chances that I could need any additional procedures done during this surgery (ie. liposuction around arms and underarms)?


Liposuction of additional areas can be determined and discuss with us prior to the surgery.

What are the possible options for what my chin may look like after my surgery?


You can see the surgical result the right after the surgery. The finally result usually takes 6 months after surgery.

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


You will receive IV antibiotic immediately prior to surgery start and additional doses if the surgery last 6 hours. The antibiotic dosing follows the national surgical site infection protocol.

How will my chin be affected by this surgery?


You may feel numbness afterwards, however nerve damage is very rare.

What are my options for how much my breast size can be reduced?


Generally almost all the breast and fatty tissue can be removed by the procedure. The larger the preoperative tissue mass the greater amount of tissue can be removed.

How long will this surgery take?


This surgery will usually take 30 minutes to an hour to complete

How long will the results of this surgery last?


As long as there is no further weight gain and you do not take any steroid the surgery result should be permanent.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


Usually in the recovery room, within an hour of your surgery ending.

What surgical technique will you use?


There are two options that the patient can choose from depending on the results they wish to achieve. An incision is made under the chin, where an implant will be placed or the bone around the chin will be surgically reduced along with any fatty tissue

Are there any other surgical options?


Combination surgery with liposuction and direct surgical excision are usually necessary to clear the tissue on his chest wall.

How long will my surgery take?


Approximately 4 to 6 hours.

What are my non-surgical options?


If there is a lot of excessive breast tissue, surgery is the only true option. If the major component is fatty tissue, some non-surgical alternative such as RF may be helpful.

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


The risks and complications are similar to other aesthetic surgery. They include local such as skin ischemia and loss and this is more common in smoker, hematoma, and nerve injury asymmetry. The systemic complications include blood clot and PE and other anesthesia risks. In healthy patients in the hands of board-certified Plastic Surgeons, the complication rates are in fact not very high.

What will this surgery do?


The surgery will reduce excessive tissue and fat on male chest wall and breast tissue.

Why do I need this surgery?


Gynecomastia surgery is to reduce breast tissue and fat on male chest wall and tissue behind nipples.

Before the surgery


    • I will call my healthcare team if I am sick or have a fever
    • I will stop taking herbal supplements today
    • I will stop taking anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) today
      I will stop taking aspirin today
    • I will stop taking blood thinners today
    • I will not eat or drink anything after midnight
    • If I smoke, I will stop smoking six weeks before surgery

    I will wear a button-front shirt and loose clothing to the clinic/hospital

Preparing for surgery


  • Pack the things you will need in the hospital
  • Take time off from work
  • Get help around the house during my recovery
  • I have a ride home after surgery
  • Ask someone to stay with me the first night after surgery
  • I have my pre-operative anesthesia clearance (if prescribed)
  • I completed my lab tests (if prescribed)
  • I know where and what time to go for surgery
  • Call my doctor if I have questions
  • I know which medications to stop before surgery

Are there any other surgical options?


Patients can undergo mandibular osteotomy, sliding/osseous genioplasty and autologous fat transfer,

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


Yes. You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can get the information on our website or call my office for direction.

What are my non-surgical options?


Gel fillers are a possible nonsurgical option.

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


Possible but rare complications/risk could include infection, nerve damage, implant movement, mandible bony absorption, rejection of implant and lip dysfunction

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


Arrive one and an half hour before your scheduled surgery.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of your surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


History and physical, EKG, CBC, and metabolic panel for patients over 55 years of age. Thyroid panel for patients with thyroid disorders.

What will this surgery do?


This surgery aims to enhance the overall shape of the face with an implant placement or reduction surgery on the bone of the chin

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


We will review the medications that will be needed to be stopped prior to the procedure.

Can you review my medication list with me?


Yes, we will review the medication list before your surgery.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


You will meet with the anesthesiologist prior to the surgery in the preoperative area. You may arrange to speak to an anesthesiologist by telephone prior to your surgery date.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


I usually use local anesthesia with IV sedation.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


You may return to work as early as one week.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and feel able to drive.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


You should plan on recovering at home for one week. You cannot plan for heavy exercise for two to three weeks.

Why do I need this surgery?


If you are unhappy with the structure, size, shape, or thickness of your chin

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


My patients usually go home once they have recovered from the anesthesia.

Will I have any visible scars?


There will be scars hidden under the chin, temporal region, under the side burn, inside the ear, and behind the ear.

Why do I need this surgery?


If the cyst is causing significant irritation or discomfort, it is recommended that you have the cyst removed.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


You will discuss postoperative pain control with the surgeon at your postoperative appointment with your surgeon and receive a prescription.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


Pain is usually very minimal after surgery. My patients usually do not need to take any narcotic after 72 hours.

How will my face feel after this surgery in the short and long-term?


Your face will feel numbness and tight after surgery. The incision may be slightly tender or itchy.

How long will any swelling and bruising in my face last?


The majority of the swelling and bruising resolves within ten days to two weeks.

How long will it take for my face to recover so that I can see its final shape?


You should have a normal working appearance at ten days to two weeks.

What are the different methods of treating flexor tendon injuries?


Flexor tendon injuries often cause functional impairments which is the inability of the affected finger to bend or to make a fist and the inability to bend your wrist forward.

What are the different methods of treating flexor tendon injuries?
There are multiple ways to treat an flexor tendon injury depending on the age of the injury, mechanism of injury and the location of the injury.

Splinting – the injured finger is placed into a splint to straighten the finger and allow the ruptured tendon to scar down and restore the function of the finger

Surgical repair – when the end opposing ends of the cut/ruptured tendon is brought back together and sutured.  After surgical repair, you often need to placed into a cast to protect the surgical repair.

Pin – you may need a steal pin placed across a joint space in additional to splint/casting to stabilize a joint in order to help the tendon heal.

What happens when my flexor tendon is injured?


Flexor tendon injuries often cause functional impairments which is the inability of the affected finger to bend or to make a fist and the inability to bend your wrist forward.

What is an flexor tendon?


Flexor tendons are tendons run on the palmar side of your arm down the palm of the your hand and fingers.  They function to bend/flex the wrist, fingers and thumb to allow your to grasp things and make a fist.

What causes flexor tendon injuries?


Injuries to flexor tendons (tendons on the palm and palmar aspect of the arm) often results from cuts or when there is significant jamming force hitting the fingers causing the tendons to rip or rupture from their bony attachment.  This leads to functional impairments as well as anatomic deformities.

Post-operative care/instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Keep your incision clean and dry
  • Keep your foot elevated when sitting or laying down and apply ice to it to reduce swelling as advised by your doctor
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on caring for your cast and foot
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions regarding putting weight on the affected foot
  • Attend physical therapy appointments as long as advised by your doctor
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

Call the doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • You notice that the skin on your affected foot is pale or has an unusual color
  • You are unable to move the toes on your affected foot
  • You cannot feel the toes on your affected foot
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

Care after surgery


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy
  • Do not put weight on your affected foot as long as advised by your doctor

When can I resume sexual activity?


There is no restrictions to sexual activity after surgery.

When can I drive again?


This is dependent on the complexity of the injury and surgery.  It is advised that you have a friend/family member drive you home after surgery.  Additionally, driving and operating heavy machinery should be avoided if you are taking any prescription pain medications.

When can I go back to work?


Depending on the complexity of your surgery, you may return to work as soon as 1-2 days after surgery or 3-4 weeks after surgery.   You may need some of your tasks at work to be modified for some time during the recovery process.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


If you pain is control, your activity can be as tolerated after surgery.

How long will I need to use any special equipment, such as a boot or crutches?


Depending on your specific surgical intervention, you may have a cast on your ankle after surgery if there is a tendon harvest from your heal.  You may also need crutches to maneuver around after surgery. Additionally for the repair in the hand, you may have a cast for 4-6 weeks followed by splints as you recover.

When will my cast be removed?


Usually the cast is removed after 4-6 weeks.

Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed?


Yes, you will have sutures/staples/pins that will need to be removed after surgery.  The appropriate time for these to be removed depends on your specific condition.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


You will need to return for a follow up appointment 10-14 days after surgery.  You will also be set up for a physiotherapy appointment prior to your discharge.

When can I take a shower?


You can take a shower the evening after your surgery, taking care to not get your cast(s) wet.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


After surgery, you should be able to resume all your medications.  If there are any specific medications you need to avoid, you will be notified by your team.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


Your prescription medications will be given to you upon discharge from the hospital or after your surgery.

When will I start physical therapy and how often do I need to go?


Typically you will need to start physiotherapy exercises when the cast comes off your arm.  Sometimes, depending on the complexity of injury, you may need to start physiotherapy earlier.  This will be organized for you after your surgery.

How are we going to manage my pain?


For minor surgical procedures we usually recommend that the patient take acetaminophen (Tylenol) and/or ibuprofen (Advil/Motrin).  Sometimes for more extensive procedures, you maybe given a prescription for stronger pain medications.

Post-operative care/instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed. Narcotic pain medications impair your ability to drive.
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • You may bath but do not submerge your surgical site.
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Keep your incision clean and dry
  • Elevate your head when laying down to reduce swelling in your face
  • Use cold compresses on your face to reduce swelling
    Yes, apply ice to face and neck as much as possible for at least the first two days.
  • Smoking is dangerous for facelift. You should discuss with your surgeon if you not able to quit smoking at least 4 weeks before and 4 weeks after surgery. Skin necrosis, difficulty healing, unsatisfactory result, and unsightly scarring can result from smoking.
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Avoid wearing clothing that is worn by going over your head
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to be stable and can demonstrate that your pain is under control before you are discharged.  Usually, pain medications is prescribed to you if needed. Additionally, you may experience some nausea after surgery from the anesthetics, thus you have to be able to drink and keep down water prior to being discharge.

Call your doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • Your bandages are repeatedly soaked through with blood
  • You have persistent stiffness, numbness/tingling, or weakness of your face
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


Usually this is performed as an outpatient procedure, even when your procedure is scheduled to be done in the operating room.  However, if your surgery is complex, you may need to stay overnight at the hospital for 1-2 days.

After your procedure


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

Do I need to do breathing exercises?


You will need to do breathing exercises only after you have surgery in the operating room. Your nurse will remind you how to do the breathing exercises after your surgery.  If your procedure occurs in the outpatient clinic and you do not have general anesthesia, no breathing exercises is needed after surgery.

When can I drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and you feel capable of driving.

When can I eat or drink?


If you require general anesthesia, you will need to stop drinking/eating at midnight, the night before surgery.  If your surgery is performed in day surgery or surgical clinic, there is no restrictions to eating or drinking

How are we preventing the formation of blood clots?


Prevention of blood clot formation is only needed if you are admitted into the hospital after your surgery or if you will be immobilized after surgery (i.e. if you have a tendon repair on the foot/leg).  Otherwise, we will no need to implement any preventative measures for blood clots for outpatient procedures

When can I go back to work?


For most clients, you may return to work after one week. If you need to do heavy lifting or if you are in front of the camera the time requirement may be longer.

When can I resume sexual activity?


You may resume sexual activity at two to three weeks.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


You should avoid bending over or heavy lifting for two weeks.

When will my staples or sutures be removed?


The sutures in front of the ear are typically removed at one week and the sutures behind the ear are removed at two weeks.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


With the exception of blood thinners, most prescription drugs do not need to be stopped and can be continued throughout the day of the procedure.  Blood thinners can be restarted after surgery.

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


Usually, you will not be placed on any antibiotics after surgery.  However, if the ruptured/injured tendon is a result of an open laceration, you will be placed on a dose of antibiotics and it is commonly prescribed for 7-10 days

Will I have any dressings on my face after this surgery?


You will have dressing on your head and neck after surgery.

When will my bandages be removed?


Your bandages will be removed at your first follow-up appointment.

How much will this surgery cost?


Please contact my office for the information.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


You will follow up a day or two after surgery. Following this weekly appointment until you are fully recovered.

How long will the results of this surgery last?


Because skin is excised and SMAS are shifted and tighten, your results will last many years and longer. It also helps if you maintain your skin with skin care products, no smoking, and sun avoidance. Periodic treatments with no invasive procedures such as Botox, fillers, micro laser or chemical peels and IPL can keep your look youthful look. If you lose significant weight, your results may loosen.

How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my face?


Keep your face elevated and ice.

How did my procedure go?


Unless your surgeon specifically says otherwise, your surgery went according to plan without complications.  Success of the surgery depends on post-operative management such continual stretching and exercises when the cast is removed.

Are there any special instructions for caring for my face?


Yes, the postoperative instructions will be reviewed at your preoperative appointment. After the initial bandage is removed, apply polysporin or vitamin E to your incisions twice daily.

Can I have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time?


Yes. Blepharoplasty, fat transfer to the face, chemical peels and laser are commonly done at the same time.

On the day of the surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
  • Make sure you have confirmed the surgery you are having
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
  • Make sure the correct side of your surgery has been marked
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

How do I take care of my incisions?


Just keep you wound clean and dry.

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


For procedures done under local anesthetics, no antibiotics is needed for surgery.  If you require general anesthesia, we generally give one dose of antibiotics prior to surgery.  You will not need antibiotics after surgery.

 

If you injury is fresh and complex and the damage to your tendon is due to an open laceration, you may receive a course of antibiotics

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Yes, you will receive a list of medications to avoid prior to surgery and initially after surgery. Do not take NSAIDS, ibuprofen, or aspirin until your doctor approves.

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


Yes. There are photos on the website and more in the office.

Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots?


Typically for surgery performed in surgical clinic, no medication is needed to prevent blood clot formation.  This is usually the same case for patients who have their procedure in the operating room and are discharged the same day of surgery.  However, you if you stay in the hospital after surgery and/or if you are unable to mobilize after surgery, we may give you some blood thinners to prevent the formation of blood clots after surgery.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


Tell the doctor or nurse which pharmacy you prefer. Non-narcotic medications such as Compazine may be sent electronically but narcotic pain medications must be printed and hand delivered to the pharmacy.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


If the surgery is done in surgical clinic, your friend/family member can accompany you in the room during the surgery if they feel comfortable.  If you require general anesthesia, you friend/family member will usually be able to come see you in the recovery room after you've completely waken up from anesthetics.

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will receive narcotic pain pill prescription to fill prior to surgery. You may receive IV pain medication if you need

How long will it be until I wake up?


If your surgery is done in surgical clinic, you are typically awake for the whole procedure.  However, if your surgery is complex and require general anesthesia, you will be asleep for the whole procedure and for an additional hour in recovery.

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to meet all the discharge criteria before you can go home.

Will this surgery affect my facial movements and expressions?


This surgical should not affect muscle movement. The immediate tightness from shifting the SMAS and subcutaneous dissection usually improves within the first few weeks after surgery.

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


You need to have instructions reviewed with a responsible adult.

How long will my surgery take?


The duration of the surgery is determine by the location, extent of injury and the complexity of the surgery.  Surgery can range from 30min to several hours depending the surgical intervention implemented.

When can I eat or drink?


You may eat and drink after surgery. Start with a soft, bland diet.

Can I see different options for the possible results of my surgery?


Yes.

How are we preventing the formation of blood clots?


You will have sequential compression devices applied to your legs prior in induction of anesthesia. You will be encouraged to stand up and walk as soon as possible after surgery.

How will my hairline be affected by this surgery?


The incision is planned to maintain the natural hairline and sideburn in their current position. An elevated sideburn is not a youthful look. The hairline behind the ear is not disturbed either.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


Discuss with your surgeon.

Where and how big will my incisions be?


The incision length varies with the degree of skin excess. Generally the incision begins at the temporal region extending the edge of the side burn, hugs the inside of the ear, follows the crease of the earlobe and ends in the posterior ear crease.

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


The antibiotics are stopped within 48 hours of surgery.

What surgical approach will you use?


The facelift is done in the subcutaneous plane and the skin is separated from the deep tissue I then mobilize and use resuspend the SMAS. Fat is then used to restore areas where fat and volume are lost due to aging.

Preparing for surgery


  • Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay
  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital
  • Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
  • Arrange for someone to help you with your daily routine for as long as you may need after surgery
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Stop eating and/or drinking as advised by your doctor
  • Do not smoke or drink alcohol 24 hours before your surgery
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
  • Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors
  • Make changes to your living space that will make it easier for you to access the things you may need while recovering
  • Arrange for any special equipment you may need after surgery

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

On the day of the surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
    Your driver’s license or identity will need to be verified at your appointment and at the surgery center.
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
    Review the surgery specifics at your preoperative appointment and again the day of surgery.
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
    You will be marked while you are awake in the preoperative area. Communicate with your surgeon.
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

Are there any other surgical options?


Laser liposuction of the neck or subdermal tightening with the laser fiber can improve the jaw and neckline without the incisions, general anesthesia, or recovery of facelift. Fat transfer to the face can soften the stigmata of aging and restore volume to depleted cheeks and lips. These surgical options can be done in the office with local anesthesia.

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


You will likely need someone to drive you home after surgery as driving with a cast maybe cumbersome at first and require some time before you get used to having the cast on your hand.

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


You will receive IV antibiotic immediately prior to surgery start and additional doses if the surgery last 6 hours. The antibiotic dosing follows the national surgical site infection protocol.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


Please call the office at (416)222-6986 to see your scheduled date and time for your surgery.  This surgery is usually performed at two different hospital sites: Mackenzie Health Center or Rouge Valley Centenary Hospital.  Once your appointment is set, you will be directed to the correct site.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


Usually in the recovery room, within an hour of your surgery ending.

How long will my surgery take?


Approximately 4 to 6 hours.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


If you are having surgery in the surgical clinic, you should arrive at your appointment time for surgery.  

 

If you are scheduled to have surgery in the operating room, there should be an appointed time for you to arrive in your information package given to you during your consultation with the anesthesiologist.

What are my non-surgical options?


Skin care, chemical peels and laser can improve a youthful look with no significant downtime. Botox and filler injections can have a high impact on lines but need to be repeated in intervals.

Preparing for surgery


  • Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay
  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
    Yes, arrange for help driving, heavy lifting, and caring for pets for the first few days.
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital
    Yes, you cannot drive yourself home after forehead lift.
  • Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
    You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.
  • Do not drink alcohol 24 hours prior to surgery. Do not smoke at least 6 weeks prior to surgery.
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
    You will receive the after-hours number in your postoperative instructions.
  • Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors
    You will receive the surgery location and directions at your preoperative appointment.
  • Wear a button-front shirt and loose clothing to the clinic/hospital
    Wear easy to dress clothing such as loose pants with an elastic waistband and a comfortable shirt with a zip up front.

Should I shower with antibacterial soap the night before and/or morning of surgery?


You can shower with antibacterial soap the evening prior to or the morning of your surgery.  This is only needed if your surgery is scheduled to happen in the operating room.

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


The risks and complications are similar to other aesthetic surgery. They include local such as skin ischemia and loss and this is more common in smoker, hematoma, and nerve injury asymmetry. The systemic complications include blood clot and PE and other aesthesia risks. In healthy patients in the hands of board-certified Plastic Surgeons, the complication rates are in fact not very high.

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


Yes. You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.

What will this surgery do?


Facelift (necklift) will set back the clock. The cheeks will be more balance and reverse back to a more youthful V shape, firmer and more balance. The neck and jawline will appear smoother and younger.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can get the information on our website or call my office for directions.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


If you are scheduled for surgery in the ambulatory clinic, there are no diet and fluid restrictions prior to or after surgery

However, if your surgery is scheduled to be in the operating room and you’ll seen anesthesiologist for general anesthesia, you will need to stop eating/drinking at midnight the evening prior to your surgery.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


Arrive one and an half hour before your scheduled surgery.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


Typically no other tests is required prior to surgery as trigger finger is diagnosed by symptoms experienced by the patient.  However, certain individuals on specific types of blood thinners may need a blood test immediately prior to surgery.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of your surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


Generally, blood thinners should be stopped prior to surgery.  However, different types of blood thinners should be stopped for different durations prior to surgery.  Your family physician should be consulted as to when and if you should stop your medication prior to surgery.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


History and physical, EKG, CBC, and metabolic panel for patients over 55 years of age. Thyroid panel for patients with thyroid disorders.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


You should stop taking NSAIDS, phentermine and tamoxifen two weeks prior to surgery and hormones one week prior to surgery. Please discuss tamoxifen, steroids, antimetabolites, and blood thinners with the prescribing doctor prior to scheduling your surgery. Are you able to stop them temporarily? Are you healthy for an elective surgery with general anesthesia? Take your AM blood pressure medications with a sip of water the morning of surgery.

Can you review my medication list with me?


Your medication list will be reviewed prior to surgery.  However, you should also review your medication with your family doctor as well.

Can you review my medication list with me?


Yes, your medication list will be reviewed during your consultation and your preoperative appointments. Please notify your surgeon of any changes or new medications at your preoperative appointment.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


If your procedure is complex and requires general anesthesia, you will need to see an anesthesiologist for evaluation prior to surgery.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


You will meet with the anesthesiologist prior to the surgery in the preoperative area. You may arrange to speak to an anesthesiologist by telephone prior to your surgery date.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


If your procedure is an outpatient procedure performed in the ambulatory clinic, you will be receiving local anesthetics to numb/block sensation in the hand for a short duration.  However, if your repair is extensive and it is done in the operative room, you may need general anesthesia where you a put to sleep.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


I usually use local anesthesia with IV sedation.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


Most patients will take a week off work, but some people elect to return to work prior to that.  If your cast does not interfere with your work, you can return to work 1-2 days after your surgery.  However, if your workplace requires significant manual dexterity, you might need to modify the work you do during the recovery process.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


You may return to work as early as one week.

Post-operative care/instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Keep your incisions clean and dry
  • Wear a special supportive bra as long as advised by your doctor
  • Patients should remain braless for a couple of weeks or until they feel comfortable again.
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

How long will it be until I can drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and feel able to drive.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


Depending on the injury and repair, some patients are able to drive.  However, with the cast on, some individuals find it cumbersome and difficult to drive safely.  Additionally, it is recommended that you do not drive while taking any prescription pain medication.

Call your doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • Your dressing is repeatedly soaked with blood
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

 

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


You should plan on recovering at home for one week. You cannot plan for heavy exercise for two to three weeks.

What kind of sports or exercise limitations will I have?


Will put in the cast, your arm is protected for further injury, but it is recommended that you stay away from contact sports and water activities.  After your cast is removed and you begin to regain strength, your level of activity will be modified

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


My patients usually go home once they have recovered from the anesthesia.

Will I have any visible scars?


There will be scars hidden under the chin, temporal region, under the side burn, inside the ear, and behind the ear.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


The repaired tendon usually be back to full strength about 12 weeks, but it up to six months to regain the full range of movement. In some cases, it may never be possible to move the affected finger or thumb as much as before it was damaged.

After your surgery


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy
  • If you cannot reach the doctor immediately, call 911.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


You will discuss postoperative pain control with the surgeon at your postoperative appointment with your surgeon and receive a prescription.

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


Usually, this is an outpatient procedure and you will not need to stay in the hospital.  However, if the surgery is extensive, you may need to stay overnight.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


Pain is usually very minimal after surgery. My patients usually do not need to take any narcotic after 72 hours.

Will I need any special equipment (ie boot, crutches, etc.) to help me after surgery?


You likely will not need any crutches/boots after surgery, unless the repair is in your leg.

How will my face feel after this surgery in the short and long-term?


Your face will feel numbness and tight after surgery. The incision may be slightly tender or itchy.

When can I resume sexual activity?


You may resume sexual activity at two to three weeks.

How long will any swelling and bruising in my face last?


The majority of the swelling and bruising resolves within ten days to two weeks.

Will I need physical therapy and for how long?


You will need physical therapy after surgery, as this is the most essential part to the recovery process.  Physical therapy session will start after the cast is removed and you may need several sessions for the following weeks to month of surgery.

When can I drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and you feel capable of driving.

How long will it take for my face to recover so that I can see its final shape?


You should have a normal working appearance at ten days to two weeks.

Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long?


Usually, there is no tubes or drains placed after surgery if the repair is in the hand.  Larger and more extensive repairs in the arm may require a drain placement. The drain is usually left in place for 2-3 days.

Will I have any dressings on my face after this surgery?


You will have dressing on your head after surgery.

When can I go back to work?


For most clients, you may return to work after one week. If you need to do heavy lifting the time requirement may be longer.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


We usually recommend you to take Acetaminophen (Tylenol) and/or ibuprofen (Advil/Motrin) after surgery.  You may need some prescription pain medication which will be prescribed for you after surgery.

How much will this surgery cost?


Please contact my office for the information.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


You should avoid bending over or heavy lifting for two weeks.

How long will the results of this surgery last?


Because skin is excised and SMAS are shifted and tighten, your results will last many years and longer. It also helps if you maintain your skin with skin care products, no smoking, and sun avoidance. Periodic treatments with no invasive procedures such as Botox, fillers, micro laser or chemical peels and IPL can keep your look youthful look. If you lose significant weight, your results may loosen.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


Pain after surgery can vary depending on the complexity of the injury and surgical repair.

How long will I need to wear a special supportive bra?


It is recommended that patients remain braless during the recovery process and if the patient wishes to wear a bra, they must make sure that the breast does not feel too tight.

Can I have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time?


Yes. Forehead lift is often performed in conjunction with a face-lift to provide a smoother overall look to the face. Blepharoplasty, fat transfer to the face, chemical peels and laser are commonly done at the same time.

Will I need a cast after my surgery and for how long?


You will likely need to be casted after surgery for 4-6 weeks.  Depending on the complexity of injury, it may be appropriate after a couple weeks for you to be placed into a splint for serial splinting (to progressively change the degree support you require) or placed into a dynamic splint.

Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed?


The sutures will be removed 5 days post-operatively.

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


Yes. There are photos on the website and more in the office or during consultation.

Will this surgery affect my facial movements and expressions?


This surgical should not affect muscle movement. The immediate tightness from shifting the SMAS and subcutaneous dissection usually improves within the first few weeks after surgery.

Do you think I will need a blood transfusion during my surgery?


This surgery typically does not need a blood transfusion as there is minimal blood loss and is performed in outpatient basis.  However, if your injury is chronic and requires a complex surgical intervention in the operating room, your blood type will be tested for in case there is more blood loss than usual, and a transfusion is required.  Obtaining blood type for complex operating room cases is standard procedure for all cases.

When will my bandages be removed?


Your bandages will be removed at your first follow-up appointment.

Can I see different options for the possible results of my surgery?


Yes.

How long will this surgery take?


The duration of surgery is dependent on the complexity of the injury and surgical repair.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


You will follow up a day or two after surgery. Following this weekly appointment until you are fully recovered.

How will my hairline be affected by this surgery?


The incision is planned to maintain the natural hairline and sideburn in their current position. An elevated sideburn is not a youthful look. The hairline behind the ear is not disturbed either.

When can I take a shower?


You can take a shower a day after your surgery.

What will my scar look like?


Your scar will depend on the extent and complexity of the injury.  If there the tendon rupture/laceration is associated with fractures, the repair maybe more extensive and the scar will be larger.  If possible, incisions are made along natural creases and planes to hide the incision after healing for aesthetic purposes.

Where and how big will my incisions be?


The incision length varies with the degree of skin excess. Generally the incision begins at the temporal region extending the edge of the side burn, hugs the inside of the ear, follows the crease of the earlobe and ends in the posterior ear crease.

Are there any special instructions for caring for my breasts?


You should remove the bandage dressing after 24 hours and after the removal of the dressing, it is encouraged that you start on stretching exercises.

What surgical approach will you use?


The forehead lift is done in the subcutaneous plane and the skin is separated from the deep tissue I then mobilize and use resuspend the SMAS. Fat is then used to restore areas where fat and volume at lost due to aging.

Are there any other surgical options?


I usually use local anesthesia with IV sedation.

How do I take care of my incisions?


Yes, the postoperative instructions will be reviewed at your preoperative appointment. After the initial bandage is removed, apply polysporin or vitamin E to your incisions twice daily.

What are my non-surgical options?


Skin care, chemical peels and laser can improve a youthful look with no significant downtime. Botox and filler injections can have a high impact on lines but need to be repeated in intervals.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Yes, you will receive a list of medications to avoid prior to surgery and initially after surgery. Do not take NSAIDS, ibuprofen, or aspirin until your doctor approves.

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


The risks and complications are similar to other aesthetic surgery. They include local such as skin ischemia and loss and this is more common in smoker, hematoma, and nerve injury asymmetry. The systemic complications include blood clot and PE and other aesthesia risks. In healthy patients in the hands of board-certified Plastic Surgeons, the complication rates are in fact not very high.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


Tell the doctor or nurse which pharmacy you prefer. Non-narcotic medications such as Compazine may be sent electronically but narcotic pain medications must be printed and hand delivered to the pharmacy.

What will this surgery do?


Forehead lift will set back the clock. There will be fewer wrinkles on the forehead and it will reverse back to a more youthful V shape, firmer and more balance. The forehead will appear smoother and younger.

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will receive narcotic pain pill prescription to fill prior to surgery. You may receive IV pain medication if you need.

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to have instructions reviewed with a responsible adult and meet all discharge criteria.

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


You may be released once you have met all the discharge criterias.

Where and how big will my incision be?


The incision will likely be above the region of the rupture tendon and can range in length depending on the amount of tendon retraction there is from initial injury.

When can I eat or drink?


You may eat and drink after surgery as soon as you feel well and not nauseated. Start with a soft, bland diet.

When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed?


For the majority of mastopexy patients, no drains or tubes are necessary.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


Discuss with your surgeon.

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


The antibiotics are stopped within 48 hours of surgery.

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

What are the chances that my symptoms could return after this surgery?


Symptoms may reoccur if you re-injure the hand or cause a second rupture.  As the strength of the tendon is now weaker. The exact reoccurrence rate is unknown

On the day of the surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
    Yes. Your driver’s license or identity such as OHIP number will need to be verified at your appointment and at the surgery center.
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
    Yes, review the surgery specifics at your preoperative appointment and again the day of surgery.
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
    Yes, you will be marked while you are awake in the preoperative area. Communicate with your surgeon.
  • Make sure the correct side of your surgery has been marked
    Yes, you will be marked while you are awake in the preoperative area. Communicate with your surgeon.
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms
    Yes. Please also ask any questions if you need them to be clarifying.

 

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


You will receive IV antibiotic immediately prior to surgery start and additional doses if needed in the recovery room. The antibiotic dosing follows the national surgical site infection protocol.

Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots?


Only if you are at risk for bloodclots or if you have any concerns, discuss with your doctor first and medication will be provided for you.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


Usually in the recovery room, within an hour of your surgery ending.

How long will it be until I wake up?


Patients usually wake up 10 minutes after the surgery.

How will this surgery impact my movement or flexibility in the short and long-term?


Immediately after surgery, you will be placed in a cast to protect the repair.  This cast may stay on for 4 weeks. Afterwards, depending on the injury, you will either be placed into a dynamic splint or may need serial splinting in order to slowly introduce motion to the injured joint.  In the long term, with physiotherapy and stretching, the range of motion and strength of the joint for most patients improve to about 80% of their previous function

How long will my surgery take?


The surgery can take 1-2 hours.

If I need a graft, where will it come from?


Depending on the size (diameter) of the tendon injured and location of injury, the harvest tendon will usually come from your forearm or your lower leg area.

Preparing for your surgery


  • Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay
  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
    Yes, arrange for help driving, heavy lifting, and caring for pets for the first few days.
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital
    You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.
  • Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
    You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
    You can call my office if you have any other questions.
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Do not drink alcohol 24 hours prior to surgery. Do not smoke at least 6 weeks prior to surgery.
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information

This can be found on my website or by calling the office.

  • Wear a button-front shirt and loose clothing to the clinic/hospital
    Yes, wear easy to dress clothing such as loose pants with an elastic waistband and a comfortable shirt with a zip up front.

Will you use a bone graft, staples, or plates during my surgery?


Bone grafts and plates are needed when there are complex injuries to the hand where there is a loss of bone or unstable fractures in the bones of the hand.  The need for this type of management is dependent on the type of injury sustained to the hand.

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


Yes. You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can get the information on our website or call my office for direction.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


Arrive one and an half hour before your scheduled surgery.

Will my surgery be arthroscopic or open?


Your surgical repair in the hand is performed with an open incision in the skin.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of your surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.

What can I expect if I choose to delay this surgery?


Depending on the age of the injury, choosing to delay management can result in the inability to manage the injury conservatively (without surgery/pinning) and further delay may also make the surgery technically more difficult with a higher chance of failure or the need for more complex surgical repair of the injury.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


History and physical, EKG, CBC, and metabolic panel for patients over 55 years of age. Thyroid panel for patients with thyroid disorders.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


You should stop taking NSAIDS, phentermine and tamoxifen two weeks prior to surgery and hormones one week prior to surgery. Please discuss tamoxifen, steroids, antimetabolites, and blood thinners with the prescribing doctor prior to scheduling your surgery. Are you able to stop them temporarily? Are you healthy for an elective surgery with general anesthesia? Take your AM blood pressure medications with a sip of water the morning of surgery.

Why do I need this surgery?


To reverse facial aging, fine lines, wrinkles and furrow lines. The surgery will help to change an aging square face to more V shape youthful face and to restore the overall appearance of the face.

What can I expect if I choose not to have any type of management for my injury?


If you chose not to have any management for an flexor tendon injury, it is likely that you have sustained loss of function as well as anatomical deformity in the finger/hand injured.

Can you review my medication list with me?


Yes, your medication list will be reviewed during your consultation and your pre-operative appointments. Please notify your surgeon of any changes or new medications at your preoperative appointment.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


You will meet with the anesthesiologist prior to the surgery in the preoperative area. You may arrange to speak to an anesthesiologist by telephone prior to your surgery date.

How soon would you recommend that I have this surgery?


Surgery is recommended as soon as possible as delaying management may cause more scarring in the area of injury, making it harder for conservative management with splinting as well as making the surgery more difficult technically.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


I usually like the procedure to be done under general anesthesia.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


You can usually return to work less than a week. If your job is very physical than it may take a little longer.

Are there any other surgical options?


Depending on the location of the flexor tendon injured different surgical techniques are applied to repair the injured tendon and help restore the function lost due to the tendon injury.  Other surgical repairs may include a tendon transfer to help facilitate function or tendon graft if the ends of the injured tendon cannot be approximated. Tendon grafts are harvested from another tendon in the arm or from the ankle (palmaris longus and plantaris tendon respectively).

How long will it be until I can drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and feel able to drive.

What are my non-surgical options?


Non-surgical options include splinting or casting of the injured hand/finger depending on the type and complexity of injury.  If the tendon rupture includes a fracture of a carpal bone and there is instability of the fracture or dislocation, your surgeon may elect to have your hand placed into a cast after realignment with further splinting if appropriate.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


You can resume essentially all normal daily activities after 48 hours.

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


Typical risks associated with this surgery is injury to nerves, arteries or and or nearby structures.  Additional risks include wound infections in the hand.

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


The surgery is an out patient surgery done in my own surgery center.

What will this surgery do?


This surgery attempts to bring the two ends of the ruptured/cut tendon back together in hopes that it can restore the function and dexterity in the finger.

Will I need any special clothing after this surgery?


You should use a nice supporting bra after surgery.

Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long?


I do not use any tubes, drains or catheters.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


You will discuss postoperative pain control with Dr. Hong at your pre-operative appointment and receive a prescription.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


Pain and discomfort is experienced during the first week after surgery but medication will be provided to help deal with the pain.

Will this surgery affect any future tests I may have?


There should not be any affect on future testing.

Will this surgery affect my ability to breastfeed in the future?


Most of our patients can breastfeed normally after surgery.

How will my breasts feel after surgery in the short and long-term?


In general the breasts should feel fairly normal within a few weeks to few months.

How long will any swelling last?


The swelling should settle within a few weeks.

Will I have bandages on my chest after this surgery?


You will have compression dressing during your first 24 hours after surgery.

How long will this surgery take?


It should take around 1-2 hours.

How much will this surgery cost?


You can contact my office for an estimate cost. The actual cost will be discussed with you during the initial consultation after understanding your goal and after examination to decide the type of correction you need.

How often do you do this type of surgery?


Not as often as breast augmentation but it is fairly common.

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


Please refer to my website for photos or address this during consultation.

Can I see options for the possible results of my surgery?


Yes.

Will I have any visible scars?


There will be scarring under the breast but can be hidden by the natural folds of the breast.

Where and how big will my incisions be?


A long incision is made on both breast (12 inch) at the inframammary crease or under the areolas.

What are the chances that I could need any additional procedures done during this surgery (ie. liposuction around arms and underarms)?


This will all depend on the patient’s size and BMI. If the patient is smaller in size, it is recommended that they space out their procedures to avoid shock.

How extensive will this surgery be?


This surgery requires an incision at the inframammary crease and the removal of selective fat tissue/glandular tissue is performed.

Why do I need this surgery?


Depending on the location of the injury, the mechanism of your injury and age of injury, you may need a surgical correction or pinning of the finger to help restore function  to the injured hand/finger.

Why do I need this surgery?


To reverse facial aging, sagging and heavy jowls and neck laxity. The surgery will help to change an aging square face to more V shape youthful face and to restore areas of the face that are hallowing from aging.

What are my options for how much my breast size can be reduced?


The average volume of reduction can range from 300ml – 800ml per. breast and maximum is up to 2250 ml per. breast, however the most ideal volume of removal is less than 500 ml.

How long will the results of this surgery last?


The results of this surgery should last for a life-time, as long as the patient does not gain excessive weight.

Are there any other surgical options?


There is a less invasive procedure available – liposuction for breast reduction.

Aftercare


  • Apply lotions and sunscreens to sun-exposed areas until the healing process is complete
  • Please follow our post treatment instruction and cream
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities

Call your doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your procedural area
  • You have persistent stiffness, numbness/tingling, or weakness of your face
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


Patients should book an appointment to return in 10 days.

When can I take a shower?


Patients are allowed to shower as soon as they wish.

Are there any special precautions I should take?


Patients should take all efforts to avoid sunlight and avoid swimming.

How do I take care of my procedural area?


Patients should strictly follow all postoperative care instructions.

Are there any other surgical options?


There is a less invasive procedure avaliable – liposuction for breast reduction.

Preparing for your surgery


  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
    Please email or call my office.
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
  • How long will my procedure take?
    It can range from 30 minutes to 3 hours.
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


The contact information is available on my website.

What time should I arrive for my procedure?


It is suggested patient comes in 30 minutes before the scheduled appointment time, and that the patient has set aside some time for the procedure and recovery.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


Patients can return to their normal routine right away, however to look presentable (reduce in redness), it may take up to a week or even longer if the peel is deeper.

Will I have any pain during or after this procedure?


There is no pain but patients will feel a burning sensation.

How long will this procedure take?


The procedure can vary from 30 minutes to 3 hours.

Will I have any visible marks from the acid treatment?


The first week, there will be redness and possible scabbing but it will go down as time goes by.

How much will this procedure cost?


This will depend on the amount of sessions needed and the degree of chemical peel needed.

What are my non-surgical options?


Exercising and losing weight could be an option but the results will vary and it does not target the breast specifically.

How long will the results last?


The results usually last for months to years, however the duration is dependent on how well the patient is able to follow preoperative and post operative skin care instructions and their efforts to avoid excess exposure to sunlight.

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


Photos (before & after) of previous patients are provided and can be found on my website or through consultation.

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


The risks and complications are similar to other aesthetic surgery. They include local such as hypertrophic scar and or keloid, asymmetry, skin ischemia and loss and hematoma this is more common in smoker. The systemic complications include blood clot and PE and other anesthesia risks. In healthy patients in the hands of board certified Plastic Surgeons, the complication rates are in fact not very high.

Can I see options for the possible results of different acids?


Photos previous patients that have undergone different types of chemical peels are provided and can be found on my website or through consultation.

Is it possible to have varying results?


Yes and it is dependent on the sensitivity of your skin, skin colour/pigmentation, age, the severity of skin damage, and degree of chemical peel.

Where will you do the chemical peel?


The chemical peel will be done in my office.

How soon would you recommend that I have this procedure?


It is not mandatory and patients will not experience serious adverse effects, therefore it is dependent whether the patient is willing to take time off from their daily routine and set aside a week to avoid any contact with other people.

What are my surgical options?


Surgical options are mostly effective for reducing fine lines/wrinkles, such as different types of laser resurfacing, face-lift and autologous fat grafting. It is best to discuss this during your consultation.

Are there any other non-surgical options?


Microdermabrasion and IPL (Intense Pulsed Light), laser and RF devices are possible alternative.

What are the risks and possible complications of this procedure?


Any form of treatment comes with the risk of infection. Patients will experience a burning sensation, redness, and sensitivity to the sunlight. If you are no protecting yourself from sun exposure and not using bleaching agents you may develop hyperpigmentation. Some patients may have an allergic reaction to the chemical peel and swelling.

What will a chemical peel do?


Chemical peels can leave the skin to look more youthful, radiant, fresh and healthy. A mixture of chemicals is applied onto the skin and it strips off dead/damaged skin cells to allow for new and healthier skin growth.

What will this surgery do?


This surgery will reduce the size of both your breast through removal of fatty tissues and glandular tissue in the breast.

Post-operative care/instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
    Yes, narcotic pain medications impair your ability to drive.
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
    You may bath but do not submerge your surgical site.
  • Keep your incision clean and dry
  • Elevate your head when laying down to reduce swelling in your face
  • Use cold compresses on your face to reduce swelling as advised by your doctor
  • Do not smoke as it could delay healing
    Smoking is dangerous for facelift. You should discuss with your surgeon if you not able to quit smoking at least 4 weeks before and 4 weeks after surgery. Skin necrosis, difficulty healing, unsatisfactory result, and unsightly scarring can result from smoking.
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Avoid wearing clothing that is worn by going over your head
  • Wear easy to dress, zip up the front clothing.
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

 

Call your doctor if…


 

  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • Your bandages are repeatedly soaked through with blood
  • You have persistent stiffness, numbness/tingling, or weakness of your face
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

 

 

After your surgery


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
    Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

 

When can I resume sexual activity?


You may resume sexual activity at two to three weeks.

When can I drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and you feel capable of driving.

When can I go back to work?


For most clients, you may return to work after one week. If you need to do heavy lifting or if you are in front of the camera the time requirement may be longer.

Why do I need this?


If you are concerned with the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles, acne and other form of skin damage caused by environmental factors or aging.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


You should avoid bending over or heavy lifting for two weeks.

Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed?


The sutures in front of the ear are typically removed at one week and the sutures behind the ear are removed at two weeks.

When will my bandages be removed?


Your bandages will be removed at your first follow-up appointment.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


You will follow up a day or two after surgery. Following this weekly appointment until you are fully recovered.

When can I take a shower?


You may shower after the first postoperative visit. Use a gentle shampoo to wash your hair such as baby shampoo. Pat dry and apply polysporin twice daily. Wash your hands before applying.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Tell the doctor or nurse which pharmacy you prefer. Non-narcotic medications such as Compazine may be sent electronically but narcotic pain medications must be printed and hand delivered to the pharmacy.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


Yes, you will receive a list of medications to avoid prior to surgery and initially after surgery. Do not take NSAIDS, ibuprofen, or aspirin until your doctor approves.

How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my face?


Keep your face elevated and ice.

Are there any special instructions for caring for my face?


Yes, the postoperative instructions will be reviewed at your preoperative appointment. After the initial bandage is removed, apply polysporin or vitamin E to your incisions twice daily.

How do I take care of my incisions?


Just keep you wound clean and dry.

How does my incision look?


You incision should be clean and dry.

How are we going to manage my pain?


Tell the doctor or nurse which pharmacy you prefer. Non-narcotic medications such as Compazine may be sent electronically but narcotic pain medications must be printed and hand delivered to the pharmacy.

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You will receive narcotic pain pill prescription to fill prior to surgery. You may receive IV pain medication if you need and meet discharge criteria in order to leave.

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the clinic/hospital?


You need to have instructions reviewed with a responsible adult.

When can I eat or drink?


You may eat and drink after surgery. Start with a soft, bland diet.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


Discuss with your surgeon.

Why do I need this surgery?


If you suffer from excess upperbody weight due to overly large breast that causes you to have pain/aches, bad posture, unwanted attention, difficulties with clothing, or make your body appear less proportional.

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

On the day of the surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
    Yes. Your driver’s license or identity will need to be verified at your appointment and at the surgery center.
  • Make sure you have confirmed the surgery you are having
    Yes, review the surgery specifics at your preoperative appointment and again the day of surgery.
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
    Yes, you will be marked while you are awake in the preoperative area. Communicate with your surgeon.
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


You will receive IV antibiotic immediately prior to surgery start and additional doses if the surgery last 6 hours. The antibiotic dosing follows the national surgical site infection protocol.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


Usually in the recovery room, within an hour of your surgery ending.

How long will my surgery take?


Approximately 4 to 6 hours.

Preparing for your surgery


  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital
    Yes, arrange for help driving, heavy lifting, and caring for pets for the first few days.
  • Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
    Yes, you cannot drive yourself home after forehead lift.
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
  • Do not drink alcohol 24 hours prior to surgery. Do not smoke at least 6 weeks prior to surgery.
  • Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors
    You will receive the surgery location and directions at your preoperative appointment.
  • Wear a button-front shirt and loose clothing to the clinic/hospital
    Yes, wear easy to dress clothing such as loose pants with an elastic waistband and a comfortable shirt with a zip up front.

 

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


Yes. You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can get the information on our website or call my office for directions.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


Arrive one and an half hour before your scheduled surgery.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of your surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


You should stop taking NSAIDS, phentermine and tamoxifen two weeks prior to surgery and hormones one week prior to surgery. Please discuss tamoxifen, steroids, antimetabolites, and blood thinners with the prescribing doctor prior to scheduling your surgery. Are you able to stop them temporarily? Are you healthy for an elective surgery with general anesthesia? Take your AM blood pressure medications with a sip of water the morning of surgery.

Can you review my medication list with me?


Yes, your medication list will be reviewed during your consultation and your preoperative appointments. Please notify your surgeon of any changes or new medications at your preoperative appointment.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


You will meet with the anesthesiologist prior to the surgery in the preoperative area. You may arrange to speak to an anesthesiologist by telephone prior to your surgery date.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


I usually use local anesthesia with IV sedation.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


You may return to work as early as one week.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and feel able to drive.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


You should plan on recovering at home for one week. You cannot plan for heavy exercise for two to three weeks.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


You will discuss postoperative pain control with the surgeon at your postoperative appointment with your surgeon and receive a prescription.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


Pain is usually very minimal after surgery. My patients usually do not need to take any narcotic after 72 hours.

How long will this surgery take?


Approximately 4 to 6 hours

Will I have any visible scars?


There will be scars hidden under the chin, temporal region, under the side burn, inside the ear, and behind the ear.

Where and how big will my incision be?


The incision length varies with the degree of skin excess. Generally the incision begins at the temporal region extending the edge of the side burn, hugs the inside of the ear, follows the crease of the earlobe and ends in the posterior ear crease.

How will my face feel after this surgery in the short and long-term?


Your face will feel numbness and tight after surgery. The incision may be slightly tender or itchy.

How long will any swelling and bruising in my face last?


The majority of the swelling and bruising resolves within ten days to two weeks.

How long will it take for my face to recover so that I can see its final shape?


You should have a normal working appearance at ten days to two weeks.

Will I have any dressings on my face after this surgery?


You will have dressing on your head after surgery.

How much will the surgery cost?


Please contact my office for the information.

How long will the results of the surgery last?


Because skin is excised and SMAS are shifted and tighten, your results will last many years and longer. It also helps if you maintain your skin with skin care products, no smoking, and sun avoidance. Periodic treatments with no invasive procedures such as Botox, fillers, micro laser or chemical peels and IPL can keep your look youthful look. If you lose significant weight, your results may loosen.

Can I have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time?


Yes. Brow Lift is often performed in conjunction with a face-lift to provide a smoother overall look to the face. Blepharoplasty, fat transfer to the face, chemical peels and laser are commonly done at the same time.

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


Yes. There are photos on the website and more in the office or during consultation.

Will this surgery affect my facial movements and expressions?


This surgical should not affect muscle movement. The immediate tightness from shifting the SMAS and subcutaneous dissection usually improves within the first few weeks after surgery.

Can I see different options for the possible results of my surgery?


Yes.

How will my eyes be affected by this surgery?


Directly, your eyes/eyelids should be not affected by the surgery, however the area of skin around your eyes could experience a slight lift, which will reduce the appearance of wrinkles or any fine lines.

What surgical approach will you use?


The Brow Lift is done in the subcutaneous plane and the skin is separated from the deep tissue I then mobilize, and use resuspend the SMAS. Fat is then used to restore areas where fat and volume at lost due to aging.

Are there any other surgical options?


Laser liposuction of the forehead or subdermal tightening with the laser fiber can improve fine lines/wrinkles on the forehead without the incisions, general anesthesia, or recovery of Brow Lift. Fat transfer to the face can soften the stigmata of aging and restore volume to depleted cheeks and lips. These surgical options can be done in the office with local anesthesia.

What are my non-surgical options?


Skin care, chemical peels and laser can improve a youthful look with no significant downtime. Botox and filler injections can have a high impact on lines but need to be repeated in intervals.

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


The risks and complications are similar to other aesthetic surgery. They include local such as skin ischemia and loss and this is more common in smoker, hematoma, and nerve injury asymmetry. The systemic complications include blood clot and PE and other aesthesia risks. In healthy patients in the hands of board-certified Plastic Surgeons, the complication rates are in fact not very high.

What will this surgery do?


Brow Lift will set back the clock. There will be fewer wrinkles around the area of above eye/forehead and it will reverse back to a more youthful V shape, firmer and more balance. The treated area will appear smoother and younger.

Why do I need this surgery?


To reverse facial aging, fine lines, wrinkles and furrow lines. The surgery will help to change an aging square face to more V shape youthful face and to restore the overall appearance of the face.

Post-operative care instructions


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on caring for any drains you may go home with
  • Keep your incisions clean and dry
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on massaging your breasts to prevent hardening of breast tissue around the implants
  • Wear a special supportive bra as long as advised by your doctor
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity
  • Inform your care providers before having any testing (X-rays, MRI, CT scans)

Call your doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • Your bandages are repeatedly soaked with blood
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

After your surgery


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
    Yes. If you cannot reach the doctor immediately, call 911.
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

When can I drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and feel able to drive or lift your arms without any discomfort

When can I go back to work?


You may go back to work in a couple of weeks but may take longer if your work requires any heavy lifting or is physically demanding.

When can I resume sexual activity?


A couple of weeks after surgery, as long as the patient feels comfortable and doesn’t experience any tightness/soreness. It should be noted that the patient does not raise her arm above her head during any sexual activity.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


Patients are to be in bed rest and slowly transition into a high activity level. Any physically demanding exercises for the first 7 weeks should be avoided.

How long will I need to wear a special supportive bra?


It is recommended that patients remain braless during the recovery process and if the patient wishes to wear a bra, they must make sure that the breast does not feel too tight.

When will my sutures be removed?


Most of the sutures used in this procedure are dissovable but the ends may need to be cut

When will my bandages be removed?


The bandages are removed the next day.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


Patients are seen 1-2 days after their surgery as a follow up appointment.

Do I need to take any special precautions?


If you begin to struggle physically with the exercises, stop right away and contact a doctor.

Are there any special instructions for caring for my breasts?


There should not be any pressures on the reconstructed breast and should avoid strenous exercises and avoid situatiosn that can raise blood pressure

How do I take care of my incision?


Yes, the postoperative instructions will be reviewed at your preoperative appointment. After the initial bandage is removed, apply polysporin or vitamin E to your incisions twice daily.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Yes, you will receive a list of medications to avoid prior to surgery and initially after surgery. Do not take NSAIDS, ibuprofen, or aspirin until your doctor approves.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


Tell the doctor or nurse which pharmacy you prefer. Non-narcotic medications such as Compazine may be sent electronically but narcotic pain medications must be printed and hand delivered to the pharmacy.

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will receive narcotic pain pill prescription to fill prior to surgery. You may receive IV pain medication if you need.

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to have instructions reviewed with a responsible adult and meet all discharge criteria.

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


You may be released once you have met all the discharge criterias.

When can I eat or drink?


You may eat and drink after surgery as soon as you feel well and not nauseated. Start with a soft, bland diet.

When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed?


For the majority of breast reconstruction patients, drains are removed when the drainage stops

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


Discuss with your surgeon.

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


The antibiotics are stopped within 48 hours of surgery.

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

On the day of the surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
    Yes. Your driver’s license or identity such as OHIP number will need to be verified at your appointment and at the surgery center.
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
    Yes, review the surgery specifics at your preoperative appointment and again the day of surgery.
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
    Yes, you will be marked while you are awake in the preoperative area. Communicate with your surgeon.
  • Make sure the correct side of your surgery has been marked
    Yes, you will be marked while you are awake in the preoperative area. Communicate with your surgeon.
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms
    Yes. Please also ask any questions if you need them to be clarifying.

 

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


You will receive IV antibiotic immediately prior to surgery start and additional doses if needed in the recovery room. The antibiotic dosing follows the national surgical site infection protocol.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


Usually in the recovery room, within an hour of your surgery ending.

How long will it be until I wake up?


Patients usually wake up 10 minutes after surgery is finished.

How long will my surgery take?


The surgery can take 2-6 hours.

Preparing for your surgery


  • Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay

  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
    Yes, arrange for help driving, heavy lifting, and caring for pets for the first few days.
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital

You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.

  • Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
    You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
    You can call my office if you have any other questions.
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Stop eating and/or drinking as advised by your doctor
    Do not drink alcohol 24 hours prior to surgery. Do not smoke at least 6 weeks prior to surgery.
  • Do not drink alcohol 24 hours prior to surgery. Do not smoke at least 6 weeks prior to surgery.
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
  • Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors
    This can be found on my website or by calling the office.
  • Wear a button-front shirt and loose clothing to the clinic/hospital
    Yes, wear easy to dress clothing such as loose pants with an elastic waistband and a comfortable shirt with a zip up front.

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


Yes. You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can get the information on our website or call my office for direction.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


Arrive one and an half hour before your scheduled surgery.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of your surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


History and physical, EKG, CBC, and metabolic panel for patients over 55 years of age. Thyroid panel for patients with thyroid disorders.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


You may need to stop blood thinners and any herbal medication prior to surgery.  We will review that during your pre-operative visit.

Can you review my medication list with me?


Yes, both and the anesthesiologist during your pre-operative visit will review your medication before your surgery.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


You will meet with the anesthesiologist prior to the surgery in the preoperative area. You may arrange to speak to an anesthesiologist by telephone prior to your surgery date.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


The choice of anesthesia will be discussed and chosen for you before surgery by an anesthesiologist that will review your medical history.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


Patients can return to their normal routine in 6 weeks after surgery but if your work is high demanding and physical, it may take several weeks.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


Patients can return to their normal routine in 6 weeks after surgery

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


Patients can return to their normal routine in a few days.

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


Most breast reconstruction surgery are outpatient procedures for tissue expander surgery and flap surgery are usually done inpatient

Will I need any special clothing after this surgery?


Patients are recommended to wear loose clothing that will not compress or irritate the chest area.

Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long?


I almost always use drain after breast reconstructioning

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


Patients may take extra strength Tylenol, Tylenol 3, Percocet to help with the pain.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


Pain will be moderate but medication is given to relieve any you will experience.

Will this surgery affect any future tests I may have?


No, it should not.

How will my breasts feel after surgery in the short and long-term?


Short term wise, you will feel pain, numbness and tightness around the breast area and have visible scarring. The pain, tightness and scarring will go down as time goes by, however numbness may still remain.

How long will any swelling last?


Swelling can last around 2-3 weeks.

Will I have bandages on my chest after this surgery?


Yes

What can I expect after my surgery?


You will experience discomfort, soreness, bruising and soreness for a couple of weeks and will need assistance to move in/out of bed the first day but all this will subside as you move forward with your recovery process.

Will I have any visible scars?


Yes, but scarring will fade over time but still be visible.

Where and how big will my incision be?


An incision is made at where the mastectomy scar was and at the location of the donor site. The incision will be fairly large at the donor site.

How long will the results of the surgery last?


It should last for a life time if there are no complications or infections.

If the tissue expander technique will be used, how long will the entire reconstruction process take?


The entire reconstruction process can take anywhere from 2-6 hours.

Will you need to use tissue from any other part of my body to reconstruct my breast?


Yes, if you choose not to have implants for your reconstruction.

What technique would you recommend for me and why?


This will be determine at consultation.

Can I see before and after pictures?


Refer to my website for before & after pictures or request them during consultation.

Can I see options for the possible results of the different reconstructions?


Yes.

What are my options for reconstruction techniques?


You can either have an implant inserted for reconstruction or tissue transfered from other parts of your body, such as abdomen, buttocks, back and thighs

If both breasts need to be reconstructed, will you do them at the same time?


Yes.

Is it possible to have my breast look like it did prior to my mastectomy?


Somewhat but it will not be 100% identical to your old breast.

What can I expect if I choose to delay this surgery?


Reconstruction can be done later on down the road and it is dependent on whether the patient is ready to proceed with the procedure or not.

What can I expect if I choose not to have this surgery?


If you are comfortable with your body, you do not need to proceed with the procedure.

Should I wait to have my breast reconstruction until after my cancer treatment is completed?


You should discuss this with your doctor and if you are comfortable/strong enough to do so, you may since the breast reconstructioning will not interfere with chemotherapy/radiation treatment or mammographs.

How soon after my mastectomy can I have my reconstruction surgery?


The reconstructioning can be done right after your mastectomy  in the same operation and also it can be delayed after the patient has completed cancer treatment

What are my non-surgical options?


Patients can artifically wear a breast prosthesis on their chest.

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


Wound infection, fluid under the wound, flap failure, fat necrosis and asymmetry are possible risk/complications.

What will this surgery do?


This surgery aims to reconstruct the breast (including the nipple) that was lost due to a mastectomy with the use of breast implants or flaps of tissue from other parts of the body (buttocks, abdomen, thighs or back).

Why do I need this surgery?


If you suffer from breast cancer and had to remove your breast(s) to stop the spreading of the tumor

Post-operative care


  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Keep your incision clean and dry
  • Wear a soft, comfortable bra for support
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

Call your Doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • Your dressing is repeatedly soaked with blood
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control
  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed

After your surgery


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

When will my staples or sutures be removed?


Most of the sutures used are dissolvable and thus are not needed to be removed

Do I need to follow up with my cancer doctors?


Yes

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


Patients are seen 1-2 days after their surgery as a follow up appointment.

When can I drive again?


In general, you should not drive the first 48 hours after surgery. Also if you are taking heavy necrotic, one should not be driving. Most of my clients are usually driving after 3 to 4 days.

When can I go back to work?


Patients can return to their normal routine in a week.

When can I resume sexual activity?


A couple of weeks after surgery, as long as the patient feels comfortable and doesn’t experience any tightness/soreness. It should be noted that the patient does not raise her arm above her head during any sexual activity.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


After 3-7 days into recovery, it is encouraged that you start on stretching and breathing exercises.

How do I take care of my incision?


Yes, the postoperative instructions will be reviewed at your preoperative appointment. After the initial bandage is removed, apply polysporin or vitamin E to your incisions twice daily.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Yes, you will receive a list of medications to avoid prior to surgery and initially after surgery. Do not take NSAIDS, ibuprofen, or aspirin until your doctor approves.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


Tell the doctor or nurse which pharmacy you prefer. Non-narcotic medications such as Compazine may be sent electronically but narcotic pain medications must be printed and hand delivered to the pharmacy.

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will receive narcotic pain pill prescription to fill prior to surgery. You may receive IV pain medication if you need.

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to have instructions reviewed with a responsible adult and meet all discharge criteria.

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


This is usually an outpatient procedure and you may leave as soon as you woken up and are ready to go

When can I eat or drink?


You may eat and drink after surgery as soon as you feel well and not nauseated. Start with a soft, bland diet.

When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed?


If there may be a lot of drainage after the procedure, the drain is kept until all of the excess fluid is finished draining out.

How are we preventing the formation of blood clots?


If you are healthy and has no risk factors, medication to prevent blood clots are usually not necessary.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


Discuss with your surgeon.

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


The antibiotics are stopped within 48 hours of surgery.

How much of the cancer were you able to remove?


Discuss with your surgeon.

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

On the day of the surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
    Yes. Your driver’s license or identity such as OHIP number will need to be verified at your appointment and at the surgery center.
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
    Yes, review the surgery specifics at your preoperative appointment and again the day of surgery.
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
    Yes, you will be marked while you are awake in the preoperative area. Communicate with your surgeon.
  • Make sure the correct side of your surgery has been marked
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
    Yes. Please also ask any questions if you need them to be clarifying
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms
    Please tell your surgeon if they may discuss your surgery with your ride home or if a significant other needs to be called.

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


You will receive IV antibiotic immediately prior to surgery start and additional doses if needed in the recovery room. The antibiotic dosing follows the national surgical site infection protocol.

Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots?


If you are healthy and has no risk factors, medication to prevent blood clots are usually not necessary.

When will my family be able to see me?


Usually in the recovery room, within an hour of your surgery ending.

How long will it be until I wake up?


Patients usually wake up 10 minutes after the surgery is completed.

How long will my surgery take?


Approximately 1 hour

Before Surgery


  • Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?
    Yes. You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery.
  • Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay
    Yes, arrange for help driving, heavy lifting, and caring for pets for the first few days.
  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
    Yes, you cannot drive yourself home after facelift.
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital
    You will need an adult to drive you home and stay with you 24 hours after surgery
  • Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
    You can call my office if you have any other questions
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
    Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Stop eating and/or drinking as advised by your doctor
    Do not drink alcohol 24 hours prior to surgery. Do not smoke at least 6 weeks prior to surgery.
  • Do not smoke or drink alcohol 24 hours before your surgery
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
  • Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can get the information on our website or call my office for direction.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


Arrive one and an half hour before your scheduled surgery.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of your surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


History and physical, EKG, CBC, and metabolic panel for patients over 55 years of age. Thyroid panel for patients with thyroid disorders.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


Can you review my medication list with me?


Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


You will meet with the anesthesiologist prior to the surgery in the preoperative area. You may arrange to speak to an anesthesiologist by telephone prior to your surgery date.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


I usually like the procedure to be done under general anesthesia.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


You can usually return to work within  a week. If your job is very physical than it may take a little longer.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


You may drive once you stop taking narcotic pain medication and feel able to drive.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


You can usually return to your normal routine within a week but it is advised that you avoid any physically demanding activities and heavy lifting

Who should I contact to help coordinate my care between all of my care providers?


You can contact me directly at my office and keep in touch with your family doctor for any general questions you may have. Your files will be shared among your care providers with details of how your surgery went

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


The surgery is usually performed as an outpatient.

What will my scar look like?


The scar will be thin but visible where the incision was made to remove the tumor

Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long?


If there may be a lot of drainage after the procedure, a small drain may be placed until all of the excess fluid is finished draining out.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


You will be given mild narcotic during the first few days after surgery follow by extra strength Tylenol after a few days.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


The pain is usually mild in the first few days to one to two weeks. Mild narcotic or even plain Tylenol may be enough for average patients.

What can I expect after my surgery?


You will have increase sensitivity to the operated area, experience itchiness and have some discomfort

Do you think I will need a blood transfusion during my surgery?


Blood transfusions are rare for lumpectomy

Where and how big will my incision be?


A small incision is usually made above the nipple, however this will depend on the size of the tumor

What are my options for breast reconstruction?


Breast reconstruction can be done if you experience any asymmetry in both breast. You may either correct this by obtaining fat tissue from a donor site or have implant placement

How much of my breast will be affected?


This will depend on the stage and severity of the breast cancer. You can further discuss this with me in more detail during consultation

How extensive will this surgery be?


This will depend on the stage and severity of the breast cancer. You can further discuss this with me during consultation

Will I need any other treatments before or after this surgery (chemotherapy, radiation, etc)?


This surgery is usually done in conjunction with radiation therapy.

When will the pathology results be back?


The pathology usually takes about 2 weeks to come back.

Will any lymph nodes need to be removed during this surgery?


This will depend on the stage and severity of the breast cancer. In more serious cases, you will need to remove more than a couple of lymph nodes

What new information will we learn about my cancer after this surgery?


We will learn whether the removal of the tumor will be the only treatment you need in order to be cancer-free or if the cancer will reoccur again and continue to grow

How often do you do this type of surgery here?


This surgery is usually performed by a general surgeon

What are the risks of this surgery?


The risks and complications are similar to other aesthetic surgery. They include local such as hypertrophic scar and or keloid, asymmetry, skin ischemia and loss and hematoma this is more common in smoker. The systemic complications include blood clot and PE and other anesthesia risks. In healthy patients in the hands of board certified Plastic Surgeons, the complication rates are in fact not very high.

Do I need any genetic testing done?


It is best for you to do so to understand the severity of your condition and to have a better idea of the outcome by taking into account your genetic background

How will this surgery affect my quality of life in the short-term and the long-term?


The surgery should help you feel as if you have more control of managing the growth of the tumor by removing it and thus avoiding the chance of the tumor spreading

How will this surgery improve my survival?


It can improve your survival by removing the tumor before it gets any larger and starts to spread to other locations

What is the goal of this surgery?


The goal of the surgery is to remove all traces of cancer cells currently present in the breast

What can I expect if I choose to delay this surgery?


Delaying of the procedure could increase the risk of further spreading of the tumor

What can I expect if I choose not to have this surgery?


Patients may do radiation therapy or chemotherapy without the surgery but it may be harder to manage and predict the growth of the tumor

How soon would you recommend that I have this surgery?


The sooner we are able to identity  and remove the tumor, the greater chance you will have in preventing or stopping the spread of the tumor

Are there any other surgical options?


There is mastectomy, but this is only when the patient has no other choice

What are my non-surgical options?


Nonsurgical options could be chemotherapy and other forms of radiation therapy, however these are usually are in combination with the surgery

What will this surgery do?


It will remove the tumor in the breast to stop the cancer cells from spreading to the whole breast and thus avoiding the need for a mastectomy

Why do I need this surgery?


If you have a breast tumor in your breast that needs to be removed

Post-operative care


  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Keep your incisions clean and dry
  • Wear a special supportive bra as long as advised by your doctor
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

Call your doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • Your dressing is repeatedly soaked with blood
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

After your surgery


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
  • Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
  • Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

When can I resume sexual activity?


Sexual activity can be resumed after 2-3 weeks and if the patient does not feel comfortable after the given time frame, they may prolong when to be sexually active again.

When can I drive again?


Patients can return to their normal routine in a few days and if you are not using narcotics.

When can I go back to work?


Patients can return to their normal routine in a few days and try to avoid any heavy lifting.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


You will be sore and in pain, it is suggested that patients rest the first day and continue to increase activity when the pain and soreness has subsided.

How long will I need to wear a special supportive bra?


It is recommended that patients remain braless during the recovery process and if the patient wishes to wear a bra, they must make sure that the breast does not feel too tight.

Do I have staples or sutures that need to be removed?


The sutures will be removed 5 days post-operatively.

When will my bandages be removed?


Your bandages will be removed the next day after surgery.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


I usually like to see my patients the first one to two days after surgery.

When can I take a shower?


You could shower after the bandage or dressing has been removed.

Are there any special instructions for caring for my breasts?


You should remove the bandage dressing after 24 hours and after the removal of the dressing, it is encouraged that you start on stretching exercises.

How do I take care of my incisions?


You should keep the area clean with minimal contact and avoid swimming.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Any mediation that can cause bleeding or alternate your medical condition need to be stopped or changed before surgery. I will be discussing with you in detail at pre operative visit.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


You should have the medication filled before the day of surgery.

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will be given pain medication to take afterwards and I will inform you in more detail after the surgery.

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to meet all the discharge criteria before you can go home.

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


My procedure is usually as an outpatient and you will be staying for a few hours after. I only let my patient go home if they are ready.

When can I eat or drink?


You can drink water and liquid shortly after the procedure.

When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed?


My usual protocol does not use drains, tubes or catheters because I use special closure technique to decrease the needs of these devices.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


I usually like you to continue with your usual medication with exception of medication that can cause bleeding. I will discuss this with you further.

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


This depends on your medical conditions and I will discuss this with you at your preoperative consultation.

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

On the day of the surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
  • Make sure the correct side of your surgery has been marked
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


Yes, patients are provided with antibiotics to take.

Do I need any medication to prevent blood clots?


If you are at risk for blood clots, medication will be provided for you after you discuss your concerns with your doctor.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


They may need to wait an hour after surgery to see you.

How long will it be until I wake up?


You usually wake up within 10 minutes from the procedure.

How long will my surgery take?


The surgery can vary from 1-3 hours.

Surgery Day Arrangements


  • Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay
  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital
  • Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Stop eating and/or drinking as advised by your doctor
  • Do not smoke or drink alcohol 24 hours before your surgery
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
  • Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors
  • Wear a button-front shirt and loose clothing to the clinic/hospital

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


Yes, patients should arrange for a drive home since they will be sedated during the surgery and will feel drowsy afterwards. It is not recommended for the patients to drive themselves home.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


It can be found on my website, by calling or our mobile app.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


We recommend that you arrive at time we have indicated during your pre-op appointment. We will also try you on your mobile phone if the time of surgery has been changed.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


You should not have anything to eat or drink 6 hours prior to the surgery.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


For my patients, general lab tests such as CBC, electrolytes, liver function, INR, PTT, cardiogram are fairly routine, Other tests may be ordered if one has special medical condition.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


In general, all medication that may cause bleeding or prolong bleeding time may need to be stopped or alter. One should not stop any medication without consulting with your family physician and the specialist that put you on these drugs.

Can you review my medication list with me?


I review all patient medications on initial consultation, pre-operative appointment and day of surgery.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


An anesthesiologist will be at the clinic to assist during the surgery and will evaluate your medical history before the surgery to determine any allergies or possible reactions to anesthesia. The anesthesiologist will discuss the possible options of anesthesia for you and address any concerns you may have.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


The choice of anesthesia will be discussed and chosen for you before surgery by an anesthesiologist that will review your medical history.

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


Patients can return to their normal routine in a few days but avoid any heavy lifting.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


Patients can return to their normal routine in a few days and if you are not using narcotics.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


Patients can return to their normal routine in a few days.

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


The surgery is an outpatient procedure. Patients are kept in the clinic for a couple of hours until they have awoken from the surgery and are ready to leave.

Will I need any special clothing after this surgery?


Patients are recommended to wear loose clothing that will not compress or irritate the chest area.

Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long?


I do not usually use drain after breast augmentation.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


Patients may take extra strength Tylenol, Tylenol 3, Percocet to help with the pain.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


Pain is usually very minimal after surgery. My patients usually do not need to take any narcotic after 72 hours.

Will this surgery affect any future tests I may have?


Breast implants can make it more difficult to read mammograms, therefore the patient may need to inform your doctor after the surgery.

Will this surgery affect my ability to breastfeed in the future?


Most of our patients can breastfeed normally after surgery.

How will my breasts feel after surgery in the short and long-term?


In general the breasts should feel fairly normal within a few weeks to few months.

How long will any swelling last?


The swelling should settle within a few weeks.

Will I have bandages on my chest after this surgery?


You will have compression dressing during your first 24 hours after surgery.

How long will this surgery take?


This surgery should take approximately 1 hour.

How much will this surgery cost?


You can contact my office for an estimate cost. The actual cost will be discussed with you during the initial consultation after understanding your goal and after examination to decide the type of correction you need.

How often do you do this type of surgery?


In my work, breast augmentation is one of the most popular procedures done and that includes replacements of implants, which requires the removal of the implant.

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


Please refer to my website for photos or request for any during consultations.

Can I see options for the possible results of my surgery?


Yes.

Will I have any visible scars?


There will be visible scars but they are hidden.

Where and how big will my incisions be?


The location of the incision will determine the size of the incision, which will depend on what incision technique is most suitable for you.

What are the chances that I could need any additional procedures done during this surgery (ie. breast lift)?


The chances will vary due to the patient’s skin elasticity, age, and texture of their skin.

Can I have breast implants again in the future?


This will depend on how successful your previous breast augmentation went and the state of your health in the future.

How extensive will this surgery be?


The surgery is basically a reverse regular breast augmentation, it requires an incision to be made where the implant will be removed physically.

Are there any other surgical options?


There are no nonsurgical options to remove implants.

What are the risks and possible complications of this surgery?


The risks and complications are similar to other aesthetic surgery. They include local such as hypertrophic scar and or keloid, asymmetry, skin ischemia and loss and hematoma this is more common in smoker. The systemic complications include blood clot and PE and other anesthesia risks. In healthy patients in the hands of board certified Plastic Surgeons, the complication rates are in fact not very high.

What will this surgery do?


This surgery will remove the current implants you have permanently or just replace them.

FAQ Breast Implant Removal


Why do I need this surgery?


If you considering in replacing your old implants for a new size, exchanging for a new implant, or just simply removing it because you no longer want implants.

Post-operative management


 

  • Take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on caring for any drains you may go home with
  • Keep your incisions clean and dry
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on massaging your breasts to prevent hardening of breast tissue around the implants
  • Wear a special supportive bra as long as advised by your doctor
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity
  • Inform your care providers before having a mammogram or other testing (X-rays, MRI, CT scans)

 

 

Call your doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • Your bandages are repeatedly soaked with blood
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

When can I drive again?


In general, you should not drive the first 48 hours after surgery. Also if you are taking heavy narcotic, one should not be driving. Most of my clients are usually driving after 3 to 4 days.

After your surgery
Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
Do not wait until your pain is severe before you ask for pain medication
Make sure the call button is within reach before medical staff leave the room
Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

When can I go back to work?


Patients can return to their normal routine in a few days.

When can I resume sexual activity?


Sexual activity can be resumed after 2-3 weeks and if the patient does not feel comfortable after the given time frame, they may prolong when to be sexually active again.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


You will be sore and in pain, it is suggested that patients rest the first day and continue to increase activity when the pain and soreness has subsided.

How long will I need to wear a special supportive bra?


It is recommended that patients remain braless during the recovery process and if the patient wishes to wear a bra, they must make sure that the breast does not feel too tight.

When will my sutures be removed?


The sutures will be removed 5 days post-operatively.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


I usually like to see my patients the first one to two days after surgery.When will my bandages be removed?
Your bandages will be removed the next day after surgery.

Do I need to take any special precautions?


It is suggested that patients avoid any activity that will raise their blood pressure, the primary concern is to prevent any amount of bleeding to occur.

Are there any special instructions for caring for my breasts?


You should remove the bandage dressing after 24 hours and after the removal of the dressing, it is encouraged that you start on stretching exercises.

How do I take care of my incisions?


You should keep the area clean with minimal contact and avoid swimming.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Any medication that can cause bleeding or alternate your medical condition need to be stopped or changed before surgery. I will be discussing with you in detail at pre operative visit.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


You should have the medication filled before the day of surgery.

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will be given pain medication to take afterwards and I will inform you in more detail after the surgery.

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to meet all the discharge criteria before you can go home.

How much longer do you think I need to stay in the hospital?


My procedure is usually as an outpatient and you will be staying for a few hours after. I only let my patient go home if they are ready.

When can I eat or drink?


You can drink water and liquid shortly after the procedure.

When can I have my drains, tubes, and/or catheters removed?


My usual protocol does not use drains, tubes or catheters because I use special closure technique to decrease the needs of these devices.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


I usually like you to continue with your usual medication with exception of medication that can cause bleeding. I will discuss this with you further.

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


This depends on your medical conditions and I will discuss this with you at your preoperative consultation.

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

On the day of your surgery


  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
  • Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
  • Make sure the correct side of your surgery has been marked
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


Yes, patients are provided with antibiotics to take.

When will my visitors be able to see me?


They may see you as soon as you wake up.

How long will it be until I wake up?


You usually wake up within 10 minutes from the procedure.

How long will my surgery take?


The surgery can vary from 1-1 1/2 hours.

Preparing for your surgery


  • Arrange for personal items you might need during your hospital stay
  • Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
  • Arrange for someone to take you home from the hospital
  • Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)
  • Do not eat or drink alcohol 24 hours before your surgery. Do no smoke 6 weeks before surgery
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
  • Make sure you have directions to the hospital/office for visitors
  • Wear a button-front shirt and loose clothing to the clinic/hospital

Call your doctor if…


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You have persistent stiffness, numbness/tingling, or weakness of your face
  • You have pain that you cannot control
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


Yes, patients should arrange for a drive home since they will be sedated during the surgery and will feel drowsy afterwards. It is not recommended for the patients to drive themselves home.

After the procedure


  • Make sure your care providers wash their hands before and after your care
  • Sit on the edge of the table for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy
  • Do not get off of the table without help if you feel weak or dizzy

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


It can be found on my website, by calling or our mobile app.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


Patients usually come back after 3-6 months to have Botox injections again. The procedure does not produce a lifetime lasting result and maintenance is required to achieve the desired look.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


We recommend that you arrive at the time we have indicated on the pre-op sheet . We will also try you on your mobile phone if the time of surgery has been changed.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


You should not have anything to eat or drink 6 hours prior to the surgery.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


In general, all medication that may cause bleeding or prolong bleeding time may need to be stopped or alter. One should not stop any medication without consulting with your family physician and the specialist that put you on these drugs.

How did my procedure go?


Please tell your surgeon if they may discuss your surgery with your ride home or if a significant other needs to be called.

Can you review my medication list with me?


I review all patient medications on initial consultation, pre operative appointment and day of surgery.

Preparing for your procedure


  • Call your doctor if you think of other questions
  • Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information
  • Make sure your identity has been confirmed with name and date of birth
  • Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
  • Make sure the correct site of your procedure has been marked
  • Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
  • Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


An anesthesiologist will be at the clinic to assist during the surgery and will evaluate your medical history before the surgery to determine any allergies or possible reactions to anesthesia. The anesthesiologist will discuss the possible options of anesthesia for you and address any concerns you may have.

How long will my procedure take?


The procedure could finish as early as 10 minutes or an hour later, depending on the amount of work that is needs to be done.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


The choice of anesthesia will be discussed and chosen for you before surgery by an anesthesiologist that will review your medical history.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can find directions on my website.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


Patients can return to their normal routine in a few days and you are not using narcotics.How long will it be until I can go back to work?
Patients can return to their normal routine in a few days.

What time should I arrive for my procedure?


You should arrive at your scheduled procedure time.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


There is no downtime for Botox Injections.

Will this surgery affect my sexual activity, and, if so, for how long?


It is recommended that sexual activity be avoided for 1 week to 10 days and after that time frame, if you do feel comfortable enough to engage in sexual activity, you may do so afterwards.

Will there be any pain? If so, to what degree?


Patients will experience minimal pain from injection but no further pain after the procedure is finished.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


Patients can return to their normal routine in a few days.

How long will I have to stay after my procedure?


There is no need to stay after the procedure. Patients may leave and return to their daily routine after injection.

How long will I be in the hospital after my surgery?


The surgery is an outpatient procedure. Patients are kept in the clinic for a couple of hours until they have awoken from the surgery and are ready to leave.

Will I have any visible scars?


The scars from the incision are usually well hidden.

How long will this procedure take?


The procedure could finish as early as 10 minutes or an hour later, depending on the amount of work that is needs to be done.

Will I need any special clothing after this surgery?


Patients are recommended to wear loose clothing that will not compress or irritate the chest area.

Will I have any tubes or drains put in during surgery and for how long?


I do not usually use drain after breast augmentation.

Will I have any visible marks from the injection sites?


No, there should be no visible marking from the injection sites.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


Patients may take extra strength Tylenol, Tylenol 3, Percocet to help with the pain.

How much will this procedure cost?


Botox cost $10-$15 per unit, therefore more areas and the larger the area is, the more costly the procedure will be.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


Patients will experience a moderate degree of pain that will subside over time, along with soreness, swelling, and bruising.

How long will the results last?


The effects of Botox could last up to 3-6 months. The longer the patient has done this procedure, the higher the chance that the effects will last longer.

Will this surgery affect any future tests I may have like mammograms?


Breast implants can make it more difficult to read mammograms, therefore the patient may need to inform your doctor after the surgery.

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


Yes

Will this surgery affect my ability to breastfeed in the future?


Usually, it does not affect your ability to breastfeed.

Can I see options for the possible results of different injectables?


Yes

How will my breasts feel after surgery in the short and long-term?


After surgery, they will feel temporary soreness, swelling, bruising and change in nipple sensation.

Is it possible to have varying results?


Yes, results depend on the patient’s skin elasticity, age, and how often/long the patient has done the procedure.

How long will any swelling last?


Most residual swelling diminishes within a month.

Will I have bandages on my chest after this surgery?


Yes

Where will you inject the product?


The injection will be made in the area where the patient desires to reduce the appearance of fine lines or the enhancement of their feature.

How much will this surgery cost?


The surgery can range from $6,000-$8,000 for both breast. Saline is on the lower end of pricing.What can I expect after my surgery?
After surgery, some discolouration and swelling will occur, but this will disappear quickly. You may also experience temporary soreness, swelling, bruising and change in nipple sensation.

How soon would you recommend that I have this procedure?


How soon would you recommend that I have this procedure?

Can I see before and after pictures of your previous work?


Refer to my website for before & after pictures or request them during consultation.

Can I see options for the possible results of my surgery?


Refer to my website for before & after pictures or request them during consultation.

Are there any other options?


Alternative to Botox can be the use of facial products (tropical creams) and chemical peels that can reduce the appearance of wrinkles. A surgical procedure can be performed depending on the patient’s needs (face lift, brow lift, forehead lift, etc.).

Where and how big will my incision be?


There are different locations of incisions that will produce different incision size. The choice of location will depend on what the patient wants, the doctor’s recommendation, and the agreed size of implant chosen for the surgery.

How long will the results of this surgery last?


The implants should last for about 10 years and will need to be replaced after that time period.

What are my choices for the type of implant that will be placed?


There are two types of breast implants, Silicone and Saline. Silicone is mostly common since it is more authentic to the feel of a natural breast.

What options do I have for implant size?


There are two major brands that carry breast implants that have a large range of size that differ in height and width. Consultation will help determine which size option is best suited to your body structure and current breast size.

What are the risks and possible complications of this procedure?


Generally speaking, Botox are safe but there is a small risk that the botlinum toxin may extend beyond the treated area and cause muscle weakness, vision problems, difficulties speaking/swallowing, trouble breathing and loss of bladder control. However, this is extremely rare.

Where in my chest will you place the implants?


This depends on the size of the patient’s breast, soft tissue over the chest wall and before operation and patient request. It can be sub muscular (under the muscle) or sub glandular (under the breasts but above the muscle).

Are there any other surgical options?


The alternatives to breast augmentation are fat grafting, and using external prosthesis

What are the risks of this surgery?


The most common risk is capsular contracture. Other risk can include hematoma, keloids, and infections.

What will this surgery do?


Breast augmentation will aim to enhance the overall appearance of your breast and add volume to the area of the chest.

Why do I need this surgery?


If you are concerned with the size of your breasts being too small, unflattering, asymmetrical, and believe that enhancing the size of your breast will improve your appearance and give you more confidence.

What will this procedure do?


The procedure aims to reduce the appearance of fine lines, such as wrinkles, associated with aging and in addition, can be used to enhance facial features by plumping or reshaping.

Post-operative care


  • Please take pain and other medications as prescribed
  • Do not drive when you are on prescription pain medications
  • Do not soak in a bath or go swimming for ten days after your surgery
  • Keep your incision clean and dry
  • Elevate your head when laying down to reduce swelling
  • Use cold compresses to help reduce swelling
  • Do not wear contact lenses for 6 weeks or as advised by your doctor
  • Wear sunglasses to protect your healing eyelids from sun and wind
  • Avoid strenuous exercise and heavy lifting as long as your doctor advises
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming normal daily activities
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on resuming sexual activity

You should call us or your family MD or go to emergency if this is the case.


  • You have a fever higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • You have shortness of breath or chest pain
  • You notice increased redness, swelling, warmth, or pain around your surgical incision
  • You notice that your incision is separating, or you have infected discharge from your incision
  • You have persistent double vision or experience vision loss
  • You experience numbness or loss of motion in your eyelids
  • Your eyelids are excessively bleeding
  • You have pain that your existing pain medications cannot control

After Surgery


Sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes before you stand up to prevent getting dizzy.  This is generally a good idea especially immediately after surgery and also if you are on narcotic medication.
Do not get out of bed without help if you feel weak or dizzy

When can I drive again?


You can drive once you are off your narcotic medication.

When can I go back to work?


You can usually get back to work within a week. Some of our clients return within one to two days but they are usually wearing sunglasses.

When can I resume sexual activity?


Usually it is safe to resume regular sexual activity after 2 weeks as long as it is not too strenuous.

What can my activity level be when I get home?


You can do daily activities. You should avoid heavy lifting or strenuous exercise.

When will my sutures be removed?


Your sutures will be removed on day 5.

When do I need to come back for a follow-up appointment?


You will be seen 2 to 3 days after your surgery.

How can I help reduce any discomfort and swelling in my face?


Keeping your head elevated will help to decrease swelling and pain after surgery.

How do I take care of my incisions and my eyes?


Just keep your wound clean and dry. There will be some steristrip on your upper lid that will be removed in the first 2 to 3 days.

Are there any medications that I need to avoid?


Yes, you will receive a list of medications to avoid prior to surgery and initially after surgery. Do not take NSAIDS, ibuprofen, or aspirin until your doctor approves.

Have we arranged for my prescriptions to be filled?


Tell the doctor or nurse which pharmacy you prefer. Non-narcotic medications such as Compazine may be sent electronically but narcotic pain medications must be printed and hand delivered to the pharmacy.

How are we going to manage my pain?


You will receive pain pill prescription to fill prior to surgery. You may receive IV pain medication during the surgery.

What needs to happen before I can be discharged?


You need to have instructions reviewed with a responsible adult.

When can I eat or drink?


You may eat and drink after surgery as soon as you feel well and not nauseated. Start with a soft, bland diet.

When can we restart my usual prescription medications?


Discuss with your surgeon.

When will we stop the preventative antibiotics started before surgery?


The antibiotics are stopped within 48 hours of surgery.

How did my procedure go?


I usually talk to you in the recovery room as well as with one to two days after surgery in your postoperative visit to explain how your surgery went.

Do I need any antibiotics to prevent infections?


Usually in the recovery room.

Make sure your procedure has been confirmed
Yes, review the surgery specifics at your preoperative appointment and again the day of surgery.

Make sure the correct site of your surgery has been marked
Yes, you will be marked while you are awake in the preoperative area. Communicate with your surgeon.

On the day of your surgery
Make sure the correct side of your surgery has been marked
Confirm any allergies and side-effects you might have
Make sure you understand and have signed the informed consent forms

When will my visitors be able to see me?


Usually in the recovery room.

How long will my surgery take?


The surgery takes one to two hours depending if you have upper or lower or both eyelids surgery.

Will I need someone to drive me home from the hospital?


Yes. You will need an adult to drive you home.

Post-operative care
Arrange for someone to take care of responsibilities at home and work
Arrange for someone to stay with you the first night after surgery
Call your doctor if you think of other questions

Notify your doctor if you get sick within 10 days of your surgery (even minor illnesses like a cold)

Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of surgery or as advised by your doctor
Do not drink alcohol 24 hours prior to surgery. Do not smoke at least 6 weeks prior to surgery.

Make sure you have the doctor’s contact information. You will receive the after-hours number in your postoperative instructions.

Can I get directions and contact information for your clinic/hospital?


You can get the information on our website or call my office for direction.

What time should I arrive for my surgery?


Arrive one and an half hour before your scheduled surgery.

When should I stop eating and drinking before surgery?


Stop eating and drinking at least 6 hours before the start of your surgery or by midnight the night before surgery.

What tests do I need to do before surgery?


History and physical, ECG, WBC, and metabolic panel for patients over 55 years of age. Thyroid panel for patients with thyroid disorders.

Will I need to stop or change any of my current medications?


Can you review my medication list with me?


All medications will be reviewed at your preoperative visit.

Do I need to see an anesthesiologist before my surgery?


You can request to see the anesthesiologist before surgery.

What kinds of anesthesia can I have for this procedure?


I usually like to do local anesthesia with IV sedation

How long will it be until I can go back to work?


You can usually return to work within a few days to 2 weeks after surgery.

How long will it be until I can drive again?


In general, you should not drive the first 48 hours after surgery. Also if you are taking heavy narcotics, one should not be driving. Most of my clients are usually driving after 3 to 4 days.

How long will it be before I can get back to my normal routine?


Most people are feeling better and may resume all normal activities after several days.

Will I have any visible scars?


Majority over 99% of the time the scar is not noticeable.

What are my options for pain medications after surgery?


Majority of patients take just plain Tylenol or Tylenol #3.

What can I expect my pain to be like?


Most of my clients only take pain medication for one to two days. Most do not have to take more than 5 pain pills in total after the procedure.

How long will any swelling or bruising in my face last?


Swelling and bruising usually last few days to few weeks depending on your age and whether you have several procedures done together.

How long will it take for my eyelids to recover so that I can see their final shape?


The final result may take four to six months. The younger you are, the quicker the recovery.

Will I have any dressings on my eyelids after this surgery?


There is usually no dressing on the lids but you may have some steristrip on the upper eyelid wound.

Will I be able to wear my contact lenses after this surgery?


I prefer that you do not wear contact lens for six weeks after surgery.

What are the chances that this cancer will recur after treatment?


Depending upon the type and location of the BCC, as well as the treatment used, recurrence rates vary.  There is typically a 85-95% cure rate seen.

Will my vision be affected by this surgery?


Usually the vision is not affected but if you developed dry eyes, the lubrication gel can cause some blurry vision temporarily.

What are the risks and possible complications of your treatment recommendation?


Risks of the surgical treatments include infection, bleeding and scar. For the non surgical treatments, you can also have a risk of infection, and scar as well as rashes from topical creams.

How will this surgery affect my eyelid movements in the short-term and long-term?


Usually not

How soon do you recommend that I have treatment for this condition?


We recommend treatment within 4-6 weeks.

Where and how big will my incision be?


In the upper eyelid, the incision will be hidden in the eyelid crease. In the lower eyelid, the incision will be either inside the eyelid or below the eyelashes.

What treatment plan do you recommend?


Your doctor will let you know the specific treatment that is best for you.

How much will this surgery cost?


You can discuss cost during the initial consultation after the examination to determine the degree of aging changes and whether there is additional work that needs to be done.

How long will the results of this surgery last?


The surgical result is usually permanent. Aging changes are on going and you may consider another procedure to improve these changes after 10 years.

Can I have other cosmetic procedures done at the same time?


Yes, you can.